Women--Suffrage--United States

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Women--Suffrage--United States

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Women--Suffrage--United States

31 Collections results for Women--Suffrage--United States

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Coronation of Womanhood poster

The poster, entitled “Coronation of Womanhood,” was commissioned by Abigail Scott Duniway in 1884 to honor supporters of the equal suffrage movement. It is printed from a photo crayon lithograph engraving by Kurz & Allison’s Art Studio. At the front center of the image, the goddess of Liberty is crowning a kneeling female figure representing womanhood. Below them is a banner reading, “Coronation of Womanhood.” Arranged in a half-circle above Liberty and Womanhood at the top of the poster are the portraits of Edward Dickinson Baker, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and James A. Garfield. Flanking either side of the image is a dais draped in bunting featuring the state crests of New York, California, Oregon, Nebraska, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia. Seated at the dais are 17 women of the suffrage movement: Martha C. Wright, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Frances Wright, Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, Susan B. Anthony, Abigail Scott Duniway, Dr. Clemence S. Lozier, Helen M. Gouger, Sarah L. Knox Goodrich, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Mary J. Collins, Julia Ward Howe, Lillie Devereux Black, Matilda Jocelyn Gage, and Ernestine L. Rose. Below the dais, there is an audience of 275 additional men recognized as supporters of women’s enfranchisement. The men depicted in the scene include Matthew Deady, Stephen F. Chadwick, Rockey Preston Earhart, Joseph N. Dolph, Melvin Clark George, Samuel Royal Thurston, George Himes, and William S. Ladd. A full listing of the depicted individuals is accessible via the identification key. The inscription at the bottom of the poster reads, “Respectfully dedicated to the loyal subjects of liberty who paved the way to woman’s enfranchisement in the Pacific Northwest, United States of America, anno domini one thousand eight hundred eighty three.” See the accompanying identification key for a full list of figures represented in the poster.

Kurz & Allison

Coronation of Womanhood posters

  • Coll 839
  • Collection
  • 1884-1885

The collection consists of two copies of a poster entitled “Coronation of Womanhood” and a single copy of an identification key to the people depicted in the poster. The posters are printed from a photo crayon lithograph engraving. At the front center of the image, the goddess of Liberty is crowning a kneeling female figure representing womanhood. Below them is a banner reading, “Coronation of Womanhood.” Arranged in a half-circle above Liberty and Womanhood at the top of the poster are the portraits of Edward Dickinson Baker, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and James A. Garfield. Flanking either side of the image is a dais draped in bunting featuring the state crests of New York, California, Oregon, Nebraska, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia. Seated at the dais are 17 women of the suffrage movement: Martha C. Wright, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Frances Wright, Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, Susan B. Anthony, Abigail Scott Duniway, Dr. Clemence S. Lozier, Helen M. Gouger, Sarah L. Knox Goodrich, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Mary J. Collins, Julia Ward Howe, Lillie Devereux Black, Matilda Jocelyn Gage, and Ernestine L. Rose. Below the dais, there is an audience of 275 additional men recognized as supporters of women’s enfranchisement. The men depicted in the scene include Matthew Deady, Stephen F. Chadwick, Rockey Preston Earhart, Joseph N. Dolph, Melvin Clark George, Samuel Royal Thurston, and William S. Ladd. A full listing of the depicted individuals is accessible via the identification key. The inscription at the bottom of the poster reads, “Respectfully dedicated to the loyal subjects of liberty who paved the way to woman’s enfranchisement in the Pacific Northwest, United States of America, anno domini one thousand eight hundred eighty three.”

Source: The Idaho Semi-Weekly World. February 20, 1885.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

Women collection, circa 1899-1950

  • Mss 1534
  • Collection
  • 1899-1950

Collection of materials assembled by the Oregon Historical Society relating to women in Oregon, ca. 1899-1950. Included in the collection are postcards with anti and pro-suffrage images, the correspondence and diary of Mrs. Sylvia Thompson, the correspondence of M.H. Wicoxon, scrapbook of the League of Women Voters, papers of various women's political groups (including anti-suffrage groups) and newspaper clippings regarding women's rights, legal status and prominent women.

Initiative Petition for Equal Suffrage Amendment, 1906

A blank copy of the initiative petition form to add an equal suffrage amendment to the ballot for the 1906 election. The document is one page folded in half, with the initiative text on the front and a blank form for petitioner’s names, addresses, and voter registration information on the back. Condition note: the paper has fully separated at the crease.

Is It Just?

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It includes accounts of the success of suffrage in Colorado, Idaho, and Wyoming, The last page of the leaflet contains a photograph photograph of Susan B. Anthony and selected quotes from her writings on equal suffrage. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Election-Day Postcard

A postcard of a woman in formal dress with a voting district sash leaving her house on election day while a man sits in a chair feeding two young children in a chair. A sign above the man’s head reads, “What is a suffragette without a suffering household?” The note on the verso of the postcard reads, “Dear Mrs. Payne, don’t get insulted about this card. It is all I have to send. I will want ten doz. Eggs anyway if not more. Mrs. R.”

Dunston-Weiler Lithography Co.

Election-Day Postcard

Verso of a postcard of a woman in formal dress with a voting district sash leaving her house on election day while a man sits in a chair feeding two young children in a chair. A sign above the man’s head reads, “What is a suffragette without a suffering household?” The note on the verso of the postcard reads, “Dear Mrs. Payne, don’t get insulted about this card. It is all I have to send. I will want ten doz. Eggs anyway if not more. Mrs. R.”

Dunston-Weiler Lithography Co.

Judge Lindsey on Suffrage

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It includes an account by Judge Ben Lindsey from Denver, Colorado describing the positive impact of equal suffrage in Colorado. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Mrs. Decker on Equal Suffrage

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It includes excerpts from an account of the success of equal suffrage in Colorado written by Sarah Platt Decker, a resident of Denver. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Lincoln, Garfield, and Roosevelt for Equal Rights

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It outlines Presidents Abraham Lincoln, James A. Garfield, and Theodore Roosevelt’s track record in support of equal suffrage. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Where Women Vote

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It includes accounts of the successful enfranchisement of women in Colorado. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Roosevelt for Equal Rights

A leaflet outlining arguments in favor of the 1906 Oregon referendum on equal suffrage. It outlines President Theodore Roosevelt’s track record in support of equal suffrage. The document is a single-sheet folded into 4 pages.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Katherine Gray Club meeting

Members of the Katherine Gray Club pack canned food into a box during a meeting in 1956. Katherine Gray, along with Hattie Redmond, co-founded the Colored Women’s Equal Suffrage League and worked with Beatrice Cannady to protest the showing of “Birth of a Nation,” the racist 1915 film by D.W. Griffith. She was also the president of the Oregon Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, which created a club in her honor.

Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs

Instructions to Canvassers

A single-page flier with instructions to canvassers who gathered signatures for petitions to place an amendment for equal suffrage on the June, 1906 Oregon ballot.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Will Federal Suffrage Amendment Complicate the Race Problem?

A single-page flier produced by the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage entitled, “Will the Federal Suffrage Amendment Complicate the Race Problem?” The flier uses population data from the 1910 census to argue that enfranchising women would not increase the proportion of the African American vote.

Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage (U.S.)

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