Waxwings

Taxonomy

Code

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Waxwings

Equivalent terms

Waxwings

Associated terms

Waxwings

21 Collections results for Waxwings

21 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

The cedar waxwing

This manuscript begins with explaining how bird names are chosen and that it is often connected to food habits or a distinguishing feature of the plumage. In the case of the cedar waxwing, it is named for its fondness for cedar berries and that the tips of its wings look like ceiling wax. The documents goes on to point out the peculiarity of the bird being classified as a song bird as they do not have song. Other topics include where the birds can be found and other similar species.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Cedar waxwings

Three young cedar waxwings being fed in the hands of an unidentified man. Note on negative envelope indicates that the image might have been taken by Olaus Murie.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Cedar waxwings

Three young cedar waxwings being fed in the hands of an unidentified man. Note on negative envelope indicates that the image might have been taken by Olaus Murie.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Cedar waxwings

Three young cedar waxwings being fed in the hands of an unidentified man. Note on negative envelope indicates that the image might have been taken by Olaus Murie.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953