Wasco County (Or.)

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Code

45.16005, -121.16815 Map of Wasco County (Or.)

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Wasco County (Or.)

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Wasco County (Or.)

18 Collections results for Wasco County (Or.)

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon. In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University). In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people’s needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government’s practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people’s needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government’s practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people’s needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government’s practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people’s needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government’s practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary’s Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary’s Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie’s son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and Flora Thompson at Celilo Village

Flora Thompson placing a headdress on Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson at their home in Celilo Village. This photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955 with the caption, "Getting ready for final big salmon fete at Celilo Falls, Chief Tommy Thompson aged head of Indian village there, gets his war bonnet adjusted by wife, Flora. Annual event, starting next Sunday for three days will be last because falls will be flooded this summer by backwaters of the Dalles Dam. Chief Thompson, who is centenarian will be honored." (negative 1 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Celilo Village

View of wooden structures at Celilo Village. Stacks of wood are piled in the front of the structures next to two automobile shells, one which is tipped on its side.Other photographs from this series were published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955 (negative 10 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Celilo Village

View of wooden structures at Celilo Village. A white automobile is parked in front of the building in the foreground. The Oregon Trunk Rail Bridge is visible in the background. Other photographs from this series were published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955 (negative 12 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and Flora Thompson at Celilo Village

Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and Flora Thompson at Celilo Village. The couple stand outside wearing traditional dress holding a pipe and headdress. Other photographs from this series were published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955. (negative 2 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and Flora Thompson at Celilo Village

Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and Flora Thompson in their home at Celilo Village. Flora Thompson stands holding a headdress and Tommy Thompson is holding a pipe to his lips. Other photographs from this series were published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955. (negative 3 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Celilo Village

View of Celilo Village with Celilo Falls and the Oregon Trunk Rail Bridge visible in the background. Other photographs from this series were published in the Oregon Journal on April 17, 1955 (negative 7 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998