Collection SR 1936 - Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Transcript] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 01] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 02] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 03] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 04] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 05] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 06] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 07] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 08] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 09] Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Sound Recording 10]

Identity elements

Reference code

SR 1936

Name and location of repository

Level of description

Collection

Title

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

Date(s)

  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01 (Creation)

Extent

.1 cubic feet; 5 audiocassettes (4 hr., 46 min., 9 sec.) + transcript (106 pages)

Name of creator

Biographical history

Barbara Amanda Mackenzie, nee Tudor, was born in Colorado in 1905. She grew up in Sutherlin, Oregon, and later attended St. Mary's Academy and Lincoln High School in Portland. She earned a teaching degree from the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University). In 1926, she and Thomas T. Mackenzie were married; they later had two children. Mackenzie was director of the U.S. government project that relocated Native Americans displaced by the construction of The Dalles Dam in eastern Oregon and Washington state. She also worked as a teacher in California and Oregon, working primarily with marginalized populations, and as a caseworker for the Red Cross in Arlington, Virginia. Barbara Mackenzie died in 2002.

Content and structure elements

Scope and content

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

System of arrangement

Conditions of access and use elements

Conditions governing access

Joint copyright for this interview is held by the Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Military Museum. Use is allowed according to the following statement: In Copyright – Non-Commercial Use Permitted, http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-NC/1.0/.

Physical access

Technical access

Conditions governing reproduction

Languages of the material

  • English

Scripts of the material

Language and script notes

Finding aids

Acquisition and appraisal elements

Custodial history

Immediate source of acquisition

Gift of Portland State University, c/o Katy Barber, November 2002 (Lib. Acc. 24814).

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling information

Accruals

Related materials elements

Existence and location of originals

Existence and location of copies

Related archival materials

The Celilo Falls Indian Relocation Project records, Mss 2678, and the Celilo Falls Indian Relocation Project photographs collection, collected by Barbara Mackenzie, Org. Lot 17, are also held at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library.

Barber, Katrine. Death of Celilo Falls. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005.

Related descriptions

Notes element

General note

Preferred citation: Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie, by Katy Barber, SR 1936, Oregon Historical Society Research Library.

Specialized notes

Alternative identifier(s)

Description control element

Rules or conventions

Finding aid based on DACS (Describing Archives: A Content Standard), 2nd Edition.

Sources used

Archivist's note

Sarah Stroman

Access points

Place access points

Genre access points

Accession area