Ships--Launching

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Ships--Launching

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Ships--Launching

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Ships--Launching

10 Collections results for Ships--Launching

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Ship-launching ceremony at Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing a group of people at a ceremony to launch PC-867, a submarine chaser known as the Hell Hound, at Albina Engine & Machine Works in Portland on December 3, 1942. At center, Lillian Pearson, the sister of Albina Engine president George Rodgers, is holding a bottle and preparing to christen the ship. Rodgers is immediately to the right of Pearson. To the left of Pearson, holding a bouquet, is Mae Magill, a niece of Rodgers. The other people in the photograph are unidentified. A story about the launching ceremony, headlined “’Hellship’ Launched; Another Keel Laid,” was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal’s final edition on December 3, 1942. Image note: The number 77 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 12/3/42” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 375A0414, 375A0415, and 375A0656.

Ship-launching ceremony at Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) George Rodgers, president of Albina Engine & Machine Works; his sister, Lillian Person; his niece Mae Magill; and an unidentified U. S. Navy serviceman posing in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine shipyard in Portland. The ceremony to launch the submarine chaser PC-867, known as Hell Hound, was held on December 3, 1942. Pearson, who christened the ship, is holding a bottle wrapped in ribbon, and both she and Magill are carrying large bouquets. A story about the launching ceremony, headlined “’Hellship’ Launched; Another Keel Laid,” was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal’s final edition on December 3, 1942. Image note: The number 75 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 12/3/42” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 375A0413, 375A0415, and 375A0656.

Ship launching at Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing a group of people at a ceremony to launch PC-867, a submarine chaser known as the Hell Hound, at Albina Engine & Machine Works in Portland on December 3, 1942. They are standing in front of the ship. At center, Lillian Pearson, the sister of Albina Engine president George Rodgers, is holding a bottle and preparing to christen the ship. Rodgers is immediately to the right of Pearson. To the left of Pearson, holding a bouquet, is Mae Magill, a niece of Rodgers. The other people in the photograph are unidentified. A story about the launching ceremony, headlined “’Hellship’ Launched; Another Keel Laid,” was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal’s final edition on December 3, 1942. Image note: The number 76 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 12/3/42” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 375A0413, 375A0414, and 375A0656.

Melva Lillian Cole at ship-launching ceremony, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing Melva Lillian Cole standing in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland on Friday, January 8, 1943. Cole christened the ship, a submarine chaser. She is smiling and is holding a bouquet in one hand and a bottle wrapped in ribbon in the other. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal’s final edition on Saturday, January 9, 1943. It had the following caption: “CHRISTENED IN MEMORY of a navy hero was thew subchaser Hell Hornet at Albina Engine & Machine Works Friday. Sponsor was Mrs. Melva Lillian Cole, Fargo, N. D., the hero’s widow.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Wife of Hero Launches Subchaser. Cole’s husband, U. S. Navy serviceman Wilson Burnett Cole, was killed in an attack by a German submarine in June 1942. Image note: The number 35 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / Hell Hornet / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0442, 375A0443, 375A0444, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0449, 375A0450, and 375A0451.

Melva Lillian Cole at ship-launching ceremony, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing Melva Lillian Cole standing in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland on Friday, January 8, 1943. Cole christened the ship, a submarine chaser known as Hell Hornet. She is smiling and is holding a bouquet and a bottle wrapped in ribbon. The Oregon Journal published a story about the launching and a related photograph, image No. 375A0441, on Page 10 of its final edition on January 9, 1943. The story, headlined “Wife of Hero Launches Subchaser,” reported that Cole was the widow of a U. S. Navy serviceman, Wilson Burnett Cole, who had been killed in an attack by a German submarine off Cape Hatteras in June 1942. Image note: The number 24 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0441, 375A0442, 375A0444, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0449, 375A0450, and 375A0451.

Melva Lillian Cole and unidentified man at ship-launching ceremony, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing Melva Lillian Cole and an unidentified man standing in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland on January 8, 1943. Cole christened the ship, a submarine chaser known as Hell Hornet. Cole is holding a large bouquet, and she and the man are facing one another. The Oregon Journal published a story about the launching and a related photograph, image No. 375A0441, on Page 10 of its final edition on January 9, 1943. The story, headlined “Wife of Hero Launches Subchaser,” reported that Cole was the widow of a U. S. Navy serviceman, Wilson Burnett Cole, who had been killed in an attack by a German submarine off Cape Hatteras in June 1942. Image note: The number 25 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0441, 375A0442, 375A0443, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0449, 375A0450, and 375A0451.

Melva Lillian Cole and group at ship-launching ceremony, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing a group of people standing in a row in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland on January 8, 1943. At left is Albina Engine president George Rodgers; second from right is U. S. Navy Commander Leland D. Whitford, supervisor of naval shipbuilding in the Portland area; and fourth from right is Melva Lillian Cole, who christened the ship, a submarine chaser known as Hell Hornet. The other people in the photograph are unidentified. The Oregon Journal published a story about the launching and a related photograph, image No. 375A0441, on Page 10 of its final edition on January 9, 1943. The story, headlined “Wife of Hero Launches Subchaser,” reported that Cole was the widow of a U. S. Navy serviceman, Wilson Burnett Cole, who had been killed in an attack by a German submarine off Cape Hatteras in June 1942. Image note: The number 29 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0441, 375A0442, 375A0443, 375A0444, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0450, and 375A0451.

Workers aboard the submarine chaser Hell Hornet at Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph, looking upward, showing seven unidentified people, probably workers at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard, gathered at the bow of PC 816, a submarine chaser known as the Hell Hornet. The bow is draped with bunting. The ship was constructed Albina shipyard, and a launching ceremony was held on January 8, 1943. The number 30 is written on the negative and is faintly visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / Hell Hornet / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0441, 375A0442, 375A0443, 375A0444, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0449, and 375A0451.

Melva Lillian Cole and group at ship-launching ceremony, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing four people standing in a row in front of a ship during a launching ceremony at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland. At left is George Rodgers, president of Albina Engine; second from left is Melva Lillian Cole, who christened the ship, a submarine chaser known as Hell Hornet; and at far right is U. S. Navy Commander Leland D. Whitford, supervisor of naval shipbuilding in the Portland area. The second man from right is unidentified. The Oregon Journal published a story about the launching and a related photograph, image No. 375A0441, on Page 10 of its final edition on January 9, 1943. The story, headlined “Wife of Hero Launches Subchaser,” reported that Cole was the widow of a U. S. Navy serviceman, Wilson Burnett Cole, who had been killed in an attack by a German submarine off Cape Hatteras in June 1942. Image note: The number 31 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding / Launching / 1/8/43” is written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 375A0434, 375A0435, 375A0436, 375A0437, 375A0438, 375A0439, 375A0440, 375A0441, 375A0442, 375A0443, 375A0444, 375A0445, 375A0446, 375A0447, 375A0448, 375A0449, and 375A0450.

Ship-launching ceremony at Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Photograph showing a group of people at a ceremony to launch PC-867, a submarine chaser known as the Hell Hound, at Albina Engine & Machine Works in Portland on December 3, 1942. At center right, Lillian Pearson, the sister of Albina Engine president George Rodgers, is holding a bottle and preparing to christen the ship. Rodgers is immediately to the right of Pearson. To the left of Pearson, holding a bouquet, is Mae Magill, a niece of Rodgers. The other people in the photograph are unidentified. A story about the launching ceremony, headlined “’Hellship’ Launched; Another Keel Laid,” was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal’s final edition on December 3, 1942. Image note: The number 74 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. The text “Albina shipbuilding” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 375A0413, 375A0414, and 375A0415.