Sculpture

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Sculpture

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Sculpture

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Sculpture

30 Collections results for Sculpture

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Arts, entertainment, and community events

Photographs, circa 1923 to 1936, of people and activities related to arts; entertainment; the Portland Rose Festival; and other community events, performances, and ceremonies. Arts-oriented images include portraits of dancers and musicians, primarily children, as well as photographs of actors, actresses, and theatrical productions or rehearsals. Photographs of the Portland Rose Festival include activities and portraits of festival queens and princesses. This series also includes photographs of parades and circus performers and performances.

Oregon Journal

Cave at The Grotto, Portland

Photograph, taken from the front, showing the cave at the National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother (The Grotto) in Portland. Inside the cave, standing on pillars of rock, are three statues. The statue at center is a marble replica of Michaelangelo's Pietà, depicting Mary holding the body of Jesus. On either side is a statue of an angel raising a torch. Also see image No. 371N5607. The text “Grotto” is written on the negative.

Cave at The Grotto, Portland

Photograph, taken from the side, showing the cave at the National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother (The Grotto) in Portland, as well as the steps and benches in front of the cave. Two statues are visible inside the cave, standing on pillars of rock. The statue at left is a marble replica of Michaelangelo’s Pietà, depicting Mary holding the body of Jesus. At right is a statue of an angel raising a torch. Also see image No. 371N5606. The text “Grotto” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Adrien Voisin, working on sculpture of Two Guns White Calf

Portrait of an artist in a smock and beret, sitting at sculptor’s table and working on a sculpture of a Blackfoot man. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N2894 and 371N2895, was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on August 13, 1933. The photographs accompanied an article about Voisin, titled “Adventures of a Sculptor Among the Blackfeet Indians of Montana.” This photograph had the following caption: “Adrien Voisin, Portland sculptor, with a figure of Two-Guns-White Calf, the model of the Indian head on the buffalo nickel.” Also see image Nos. 371N2896, 371N2897, 371N2902, and 371N2903.

Three artists at work

Photograph of three unidentified artists. At left is a woman standing at an easel, drawing a male figure. In the center is a man sculpting a bust. At right is a man sculpting a bas-relief.

Sculpture of Native American man with animal skull

Photograph of a sculpture by Adrien Voisin that depicts a seated Native American man with an animal skull in his lap. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N2565 and 371N2895, was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on August 13, 1933. The photographs accompanied an article about Voisin, titled “Adventures of a Sculptor Among the Blackfeet Indians of Montana.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Lost Buffalo Trail, depicting an old Indian pondering on the past glories of his tribe.” Also see image Nos. 371N2896, 371N2897, 371N2902, and 371N2903.

Bust of Blackfoot woman

Photograph, taken from the side, of a sculpture of a woman with braided hair. The bust was sculpted by Adrien Voisin. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N2565 and 371N2894, was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on August 13, 1933. The photographs accompanied an article about Voisin, titled “Adventures of a Sculptor Among the Blackfeet Indians of Montana.” The caption for this photograph identified the bust as Ma-Mein-E-Ma of the Blackfoot people. Also see image Nos. 371N2896, 371N2897, 371N2902, and 371N2903.

Sculpture of nude male figure with arms raised

Photograph of a sculpture of a nude male figure with braided hair and upraised arms. The figure is looking upward and appears to be holding something in one hand. The sculpture is probably the work of artist Adrien Voisin; see image Nos. 371N2565, 371N2894, 371N2895, 371N2896, 371N2902, and 371N2903.

'Coming of the White Man' statue, Washington Park, Portland

Photograph showing a bronze statue, “Coming of the White Man,” depicting Chief Multnomah and a younger man looking toward the Columbia River gap. The figure of Chief Multnomah stands with his arms crossed, while the younger man holds a branch aloft, gesturing toward the river and approaching white men. The statue is located in Portland’s Washington Park. The family of former Portland Mayor David Thompson gave the money for the statue, which was sculpted by Hermon Atkins MacNeil and completed in 1904. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. “Coming of the White Man” was stop number 6 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Thomas Jefferson statue, Jefferson High School, Portland

Photograph of a bronze statue of Thomas Jefferson on the campus of Jefferson High School in Portland. The figure of Jefferson is sitting in a chair with one arm resting on the chair back. On the side of the base is the following text, all in uppercase letters: “ ‘Bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal laws must protect, and to violate would be oppression.’ / Thomas Jefferson.” A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Jefferson statue was stop number 12 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Joan of Arc statue, Portland

Photograph of a bronze statue of Joan of Arc on a horse. The figure is wearing armor and is holding a flag in one upraised arm. The statue is a casting of a sculpture in Paris by by Emmanuel Fremiet. The statue was a gift to the city from Henry Waldo Coe, who commissioned it as a monument to American forces who served in World War I, and it was placed in Coe Circle, at the intersection of what is now NE Cesar Chavez Boulevard and NE Glisan Street. The statue was dedicated on May 30, 1935. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Joan of Arc statue was stop number 10 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Spanish-American War memorial in Portland

Photograph of a bronze statue of a man holding a rifle. The figure stands atop a pillar that bears the following words in uppercase letters: “Erected by the citizens of Oregon to the dead of the Second Oregon United States Volunteer Infantry / Anno Domini MDCCCCIV.” On the round base below the pillar are the words “First in Guam / First in Philippines.” The sculpture was made by Douglas Tilden and placed in Lownsdale Square in Portland, on Southwest 4th Avenue between Southwest Main Street and Southwest Salmon Street. The statue was dedicated on May 30, 1906. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Spanish-American War memorial was stop number 1 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, and 371N2900, which were also part of the spread. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Bust of Su-Que-O-Sis-Con, Blackfoot people

Photograph of a bust of a Blackfoot man. The bust was made by sculptor Adrien Voisin. Carved at the base of the bust is the following text: “SU-QUE-O-SIS-CON / Blackfeet / A Voisin Sculptor / MONTANA 1929.” Also see image Nos. 371N2565, 371N2894, 371N2895, 371N2896, 371N2897, and 371N2903.

Bust of Ma-Ka, Blackfoot people

Photograph of a bust of a Blackfoot man. The bust was made by sculptor Adrien Voisin. Carved at the base of the bust is the following text: “MA-KA / Blackfeet / A Voisin Sculptor / MONTANA 1929.” Also see image Nos. 371N2565, 371N2894, 371N2895, 371N2896, 371N2897, and 371N2902.

Statue of Thomas Jefferson

Portrait of a statue of Thomas Jefferson outdoors on a lawn. The figure of Jefferson is seated in a chair with one arm resting against the back. On the front of the base is the inscription: “All will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful, must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect and to violate would be oppression / Thomas Jefferson.” Written on the negative sleeve is the text: “By Karl Bitter. / Original at Univ. of Va. / Placed at Jefferson HS 1916.”

Shemanski Fountain, South Park Blocks, Portland

Photograph showing the Shemanski Fountain in Portland’s South Park Blocks between Southwest Main Street and Southwest Salmon Street. The Masonic Temple (now the Mark Building of the Portland Art Museum) is partially visible in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Shemanski Fountain was stop number 5 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

David Campbell memorial, Southwest Portland

Photograph showing the memorial to Portland Fire Chief David Campbell and the surrounding buildings, occupied by automotive businesses. The monument features a bronze bas-relief of Campbell set into a limestone base above a fountain. The memorial is between Southwest Alder Street and Southwest 18th and 19th avenues. Campbell was killed on June 26, 1911, while fighting a fire at the Union Oil distribution plant. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Campbell memorial was stop number 8 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

David P. Thompson elk fountain, Southwest Main Street, Portland

Photograph showing the David P. Thompson fountain on Southwest Main Street in Portland between Southwest 3rd and Southwest 4th Avenues. The fountain features a sculpture of an elk on a pedestal at the center of a basin. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The elk fountain was stop number 2 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N2898, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Unveiling of David Campbell memorial, Portland

Photograph showing a crowd of seated people at the memorial to Portland Fire Chief David Campbell during the monument’s unveiling on Thursday, June 28, 1928. The memorial is between Southwest Alder Street and Southwest 18th and 19th avenues. Campbell was killed on June 26, 1911, while fighting a fire at the Union Oil distribution plant. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, June 29, 1928, under the headline “Statue Unveiled to City’s Firemen Dead.” The photograph had the following caption: “Cenotaph’s formal presentation to the city marks exact hour of 17 years ago when Fire Chief David Campbell was buried. This memorial at 19th and Washington streets [sic], is a tribute to him and all firemen who have died in line of duty.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Myrtyred [sic] Chief Honored; Statue to Him Unveiled.”

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