Nuclear weapons--Government policy--United States

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Oral history interview with Rick Rolf

This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield's opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield's work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield's opposition to much of the Reagan administration's agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield's feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield's filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield's opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 11]

Tape 6, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 12]

Tape 6, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 13]

Tape 7, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 14]

Tape 8, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 17]

Tape 9, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 15]

Tape 8, Side 2. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 16]

Tape 9, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf [Sound Recording 18]

Tape 10, Side 1. This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield’s opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield’s work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield’s opposition to much of the Reagan administration’s agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield’s feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield’s filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson

This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson's office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield's campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield's staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield's early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield's legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield's personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figures; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield's personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield's views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield's foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield's and his staff's reactions to Watergate; Hatfield's visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield's efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield's stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield's staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson’s office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield’s campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield’s staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield’s early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield’s legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield’s personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figure; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield’s personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield’s views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield’s foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield’s and his staff’s reactions to Watergate; Hatfield’s visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield’s efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield’s stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield’s staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

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