Modoc County (Calif.)

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Code

41.58985, -120.72497 Map of Modoc County (Calif.)

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Display note(s)

Equivalent terms

Modoc County (Calif.)

Associated terms

71 Collections results for Modoc County (Calif.)

The American white pelican

Manuscript that focuses on the American white pelican, which according to this document, has an unattractive appearance. The document also describes how the pelican feeds its young.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wholesale waterfowl destruction in the Klamath Country

Manuscript discusses how the waterfowl in Klamath country are now protected from hunters by game laws. The Bureau of Reclamation destroyed areas of sanctuary for waterfowl because the demand for land for agricultural use was so high. According to Dr. C. F. Marbut from the Department of Agriculture, the soil from the land in and around the bed of the Lower Klamath Lake could not support agricultural means successfully. Instead, the area became a refuge similar to Clear Lake.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Lower Klamath Lake, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges, 1917-1935

Correspondence, reports, and articles discussing the impact of agriculture and reclamation projects on the Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges. Topics of focus include the impacts of grazing on bird refuges, construction of dikes and dams on the Klamath and Link Rivers, and possible reflooding of portions of the Lower Klamath Lake.

Finley, Irene

Documents discussing Oregon and northern California refuges

Documents focus primarily on the destruction of bird nesting sites through the careless practices of the Reclamation Service, including prescribed burning and leasing of land for grazing. Other topics include cooperation between the Reclamation Service and Biological Survey, duck hunting, and recommendations for restoring refuges to ideal nesting conditions. A map of the Klamath Irrigation Project is included.

United States. Bureau of Reclamation

Tule Lake photographs

Photographs taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other members of the Yasutome family documenting their time at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. These images include portraits of the Yasutome family, including Jerry Yasutome’s son, James Mamoru Yasutome, and his parents, Sadao Kurata Yasutome and Ju Jiro Yasutome; group portraits of electrical workers and a Buddhist Sunday School; and photos of a fire at the center. Between 1942 and 1946 the Yasutome family was incarcerated by the United States government at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated during World War II. The Yasutomes' son, James Mamoru Yasutome was born at Tule Lake in 1943.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome kneeling next to his 2-year-old son, James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They both look at the camera and smile. Mamoru's face is blurry. Taken January 12, 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro Yasutome and Momoru (sic) (James) Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center. 1/12/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing behind his 2-year-old son, James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They both look at the camera and smile. Taken January 12, 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro (Jerry) Yasutome and Momoru (sic) (James) Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center. 1/12/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of James Mamoru Yasutome kneeling on the ground at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. He is 2-years-old. There is an exterior wall of a building behind him. Taken in January 1946. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Jim," and, "Momoru (sic) at Tule Lake. 1/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing outside with his hands in his pockets, looking at the camera. Taken at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in January 1946. A portion of a building is visible in the background. There is a decorative flower edge on the right side of the print. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Jiro Yasutome (Jerry), Jim's father," and, "1/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Yasutome Family, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of 4 members of the Yasutome family standing outside at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. Pictured left to right are JuJiro Yasutome, Sadao Yasutome, Toshiko Yasutome, and 2-year-old James Mamoru Yasutome (in front). There is snow on the ground. The three adults look at the camera while Mamoru looks off to the right. Taken December 20, 1945. Handwritten note on back reads, "G'father JuJiro Yasutome, Sadao Yasutome, Toshiko Yasutome, Momoru (sic) Yasutome." Additional note gives Mamoru's birthdate, "4/23/43, Mamoru 2 yrs. 8 mo." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing outside with his hands in his pockets, looking at the camera. Taken at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in January 1946. Buildings are visible in the background. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro (Jerry) Yasutome, taken at Tule Lake Relocation Center," and, "1/26/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Yasutome Family, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Sadao Kurata Yasutome, Jim's paternal grandmother (left) standing next to an unidentified woman at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They stand side by side outside, and there is snow on the ground. A building is visible in the background. Taken on December 20, 1945. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Sadao Kurata Yasutome, Jim's paternal g'mother (on left)," and, "12/20,1945." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome kneeling and holding his 2-year-old son James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They are outside, kneeling on the ground in front of a building. Both look at the camera. Taken in January 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "1/-/46. Jiro & Mamoru Yasutome (James)." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Toshiko Morioka Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Toshiko Morioka Yasutome standing in front of a building at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. She is the mother of James Mamoru Yasutome. She wears a skirt and has her hands crossed at her waist in front. There is a decorative flower edge on the right side of the print. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "1-1-46," and, "Toshiko Morioka Yasutome. Jim's mother." This is a duplicate cropped print of photograph OrgLot762_B1F1_010. The date handwritten on this print (01/01/46) is inconsistent with the date written on the duplicate print (01/27/46). The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Toshiko Morioka Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Toshiko Morioka Yasutome standing in front of a building at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. She is the mother of James Mamoru Yasutome. There is snow on the ground. She wears a skirt and has her hands crossed at her waist in front. Handwritten notes on back read, "Toshiko Moriaka (sic) Yasutome (mother of James M. Yasutome)," and, "1/27/46." This is a duplicate print of photograph OrgLot762_B1F1_009. The date handwritten on this print (01/27/46) is inconsistent with the date written on the duplicate print (01/01/46).The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Electrical workers, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Two men climb an electrical pole at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. Smoke from the high school gym fire is visible in the background. Handwritten note on the back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. Handwritten note on front indicates this is the gym. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. There is a person in the foreground. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

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