Legislation--United States

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Legislation--United States

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Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 6, Side 1. This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt’s office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad’s seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon’s resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt

This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Randall Weisberg at Wyatt's office in Portland, Oregon, from January 28 to March 24, 1992. In this interview, Wyatt discusses his family background and early life in Eugene and Portland, including his childhood hobbies, his memories of the Depression, and his interest in journalism. He then discusses studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including writing for the student newspaper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon Law School, including some of his professors, particularly Orlando Hollis; his social life; and the various jobs he held throughout. He talks about his early interest in politics and getting a job with the FBI, including his training and the kinds of investigations he participated in. He then discusses his service as a bombardier in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He talks about practicing law in Astoria after his discharge, including getting involved in Republican politics. He talks about some of the cases he worked on, including some regarding commercial fishing. He speaks at length about his involvement in the 1952 presidential election and his relationship with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse.

Wyatt discusses his time in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1964 to 1975. He talks about his appointment to take over A. Walter Norblad's seat, as well as his later re-election campaigns. He discusses the Lyndon Johnson administration, including the legislation of the Great Society Era and the Vietnam War. He then discusses the Richard Nixon administration, including Nixon's resignation and some of the accomplishments of administration. He then describes legislation that he wishes were possible, including gun control. He reflects on what he accomplished on behalf of Oregon during his time in the House and his reasons for not running for re-election in 1975. He goes on to discuss returning to Oregon to practice law. He also talks about his involvement with the U.S. District Court of Oregon, and he briefly discusses many of the judges appointed to the various courts in Oregon. He closes the interview by discussing his opinions on recent environmental debates.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman’s offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield’s staff; other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield’s relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator’s stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration’s push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield’s efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield’s real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield’s political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy

This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy's office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield's feelings about President Richard Nixon's impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield's legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield's relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy’s office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield’s feelings about President Richard Nixon’s impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield’s legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy’s office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield’s feelings about President Richard Nixon’s impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield’s legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy’s office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield’s feelings about President Richard Nixon’s impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield’s legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy’s office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield’s feelings about President Richard Nixon’s impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield’s legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield’s staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield’s personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with Riki P. Sheehan

This oral history interview with Riki P. Sheehan was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from June 2-11, 1988. In this interview, Sheehan discusses coming to Washington, D.C., after graduating from Cornell University in 1973. She describes the atmosphere of the city during the Watergate scandal and beginning to work with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield, particularly her job interview. She discusses the issues on which she disagreed with Hatfield, including on U.S.-Israeli relations and abortion. She describes her duties as a legislative assistant and working with other members of Hatfield's staff. She discusses Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as how Hatfield's position on many issues differed from that of other Republicans. She talks about cases she worked on when she first joined Hatfield's staff and describes how Hatfield would take a personal interest in some of them. Sheehan discusses Hatfield's relationship with other senators, including John Stennis, as well as Hatfield's personal and family life. She speaks at length about Hatfield's chairmanship of the Senate Appropriations Committee and her work on that committee's staff. She also describes Hatfield's relationship with the administrations of presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. Sheehan discusses Hatfield's interest in and support for Oregon Health Sciences University (now Oregon Health & Science University), as well as funding for AIDS research. She closes the interview by discussing a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984, Hatfield's family life, and his legacy.

Sheehan, Riki P. (Fredrica Poster), 1951-

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