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Oral history interview with Bill Schonely [Video 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Bill Schonely was conducted by Jack McArthur and Ian Strauss at the Moda Center in Portland, Oregon, on July 24, 2019. Franklin High School history teacher Gregory J.K. García was also present. The interview was conducted as part of the Franklin Historical Society Oral History Program, which aims to preserve the oral history projects of Advanced Placement (AP) History students at Franklin High School in Portland. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Schonely discusses his early interest in radio broadcasting, particularly his experience with Armed Forces Radio while he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He then briefly talks about his broadcasting career after his discharge, before speaking at length about his three decades as a sports announcer for the Portland Trail Blazers. He describes receiving the job offer from Trail Blazers owner Harry Glickman, putting together a radio station to broadcast games, and the naming of the team. He shares his memories of the Portland Trail Blazers; talks about changes in management, coaching, and the players of the team; and describes the Trail Blazers' 1976 NBA championship win. He also talks about some of the difficulties the team had, including player injuries, play-off losses, and earning the moniker "Jail Blazers" in the early 2000s. He discusses being laid off in 1998 and his return to the Trail Blazers as Ambassador in 2003. He closes the interview by sharing his hopes for the team's 50th season and advice for aspiring broadcasters, and he reflects upon the highlights of his career.

Schonely, Bill (William W.), 1929-

Oral history interview with Bill Schonely [Video 03]

Session 1, Part 3. This oral history interview with Bill Schonely was conducted by Jack McArthur and Ian Strauss at the Moda Center in Portland, Oregon, on July 24, 2019. Franklin High School history teacher Gregory J.K. García was also present. The interview was conducted as part of the Franklin Historical Society Oral History Program, which aims to preserve the oral history projects of Advanced Placement (AP) History students at Franklin High School in Portland. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Schonely discusses his early interest in radio broadcasting, particularly his experience with Armed Forces Radio while he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He then briefly talks about his broadcasting career after his discharge, before speaking at length about his three decades as a sports announcer for the Portland Trail Blazers. He describes receiving the job offer from Trail Blazers owner Harry Glickman, putting together a radio station to broadcast games, and the naming of the team. He shares his memories of the Portland Trail Blazers; talks about changes in management, coaching, and the players of the team; and describes the Trail Blazers' 1976 NBA championship win. He also talks about some of the difficulties the team had, including player injuries, play-off losses, and earning the moniker "Jail Blazers" in the early 2000s. He discusses being laid off in 1998 and his return to the Trail Blazers as Ambassador in 2003. He closes the interview by sharing his hopes for the team's 50th season and advice for aspiring broadcasters, and he reflects upon the highlights of his career.

Schonely, Bill (William W.), 1929-

Oral history interview with Bill Schonely [Video 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Bill Schonely was conducted by Jack McArthur and Ian Strauss at the Moda Center in Portland, Oregon, on July 24, 2019. Franklin High School history teacher Gregory J.K. García was also present. The interview was conducted as part of the Franklin Historical Society Oral History Program, which aims to preserve the oral history projects of Advanced Placement (AP) History students at Franklin High School in Portland. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Schonely discusses his early interest in radio broadcasting, particularly his experience with Armed Forces Radio while he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He then briefly talks about his broadcasting career after his discharge, before speaking at length about his three decades as a sports announcer for the Portland Trail Blazers. He describes receiving the job offer from Trail Blazers owner Harry Glickman, putting together a radio station to broadcast games, and the naming of the team. He shares his memories of the Portland Trail Blazers; talks about changes in management, coaching, and the players of the team; and describes the Trail Blazers' 1976 NBA championship win. He also talks about some of the difficulties the team had, including player injuries, play-off losses, and earning the moniker "Jail Blazers" in the early 2000s. He discusses being laid off in 1998 and his return to the Trail Blazers as Ambassador in 2003. He closes the interview by sharing his hopes for the team's 50th season and advice for aspiring broadcasters, and he reflects upon the highlights of his career.

Schonely, Bill (William W.), 1929-

Oral history interview with Bill Schonely [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Bill Schonely was conducted by Jack McArthur and Ian Strauss at the Moda Center in Portland, Oregon, on July 24, 2019. Franklin High School history teacher Gregory J.K. García was also present. The interview was conducted as part of the Franklin Historical Society Oral History Program, which aims to preserve the oral history projects of Advanced Placement (AP) History students at Franklin High School in Portland. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Schonely discusses his early interest in radio broadcasting, particularly his experience with Armed Forces Radio while he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He then briefly talks about his broadcasting career after his discharge, before speaking at length about his three decades as a sports announcer for the Portland Trail Blazers. He describes receiving the job offer from Trail Blazers owner Harry Glickman, putting together a radio station to broadcast games, and the naming of the team. He shares his memories of the Portland Trail Blazers; talks about changes in management, coaching, and the players of the team; and describes the Trail Blazers' 1976 NBA championship win. He also talks about some of the difficulties the team had, including player injuries, play-off losses, and earning the moniker "Jail Blazers" in the early 2000s. He discusses being laid off in 1998 and his return to the Trail Blazers as Ambassador in 2003. He closes the interview by sharing his hopes for the team's 50th season and advice for aspiring broadcasters, and he reflects upon the highlights of his career.

Schonely, Bill (William W.), 1929-

U. S. Navy ship passing Burnside Bridge, Portland

Photograph showing a United States Navy vessel, hull number 142, passing the Burnside Bridge in Portland. The bridge’s leaves are raised. The ship is also shown in Nos. 372A0810 and 372A0811. Also see image Nos. 372A0807, 372A0809, 372A0812, 372A0813, 372A0814, and 372A0816, which may be related.

Burnside Bridge decorated with flags for dedication ceremony, May 1926

Photograph, taken from the west side of the Willamette River, showing the Burnside Bridge decorated with flags for a dedication ceremony celebrating the bridge’s opening. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Friday, May 28, 1926, the day of the ceremony. The photograph had the following caption: “Much Water Should Run Under This Great Bridge Before It Falls.” The photograph had the following caption: “City celebrates today in honor of opening of Burnside street structure, which, with its approaches, will cost $4,500,000. Regular traffic will be permitted after 7 o’clock tonight, and the afternoon in the meantime is given over to parades, speeches, and loud cheers for the grater elbow room permitted trans-Willamette traffic and the opportunity for commercial development produced by this facility for rapid connection between East and West Sides.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “County and State Unite With City in Bridge Dedication.” Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Burnside Bridge under construction

Photograph, looking northwest, of the Burnside Bridge in Portland during construction, circa 1925. The bridge opened on May 28, 1926; see image Nos. 371N3005 and 371N3006. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Crowd at Burnside Bridge dedication ceremony

Photograph of a crowd beginning to walk over the new Burnside Bridge in Portland during dedication festivities on May 28, 1926. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on May 29, 1926, with the following caption: "A scene snapped as the draw gates were opened and the crowd was allowed to pass over the structure for the first time." The photograph was one of several published together on Page 3 under the headline "Forces of Water and Land Join in Span Dedication."

Crowd watching Ray Woods perform dive off Burnside Bridge

Photograph of a crowd watching diver Ray Moore in midair just below the Burnside Bridge on Thursday, September 6, 1934. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, September 7, 1934, under the headline “Try This One Before Breakfast.” The photograph had the following caption: “To Ray Woods of St. Louis, it’s just like eating corn flakes and cream. Here he is, just going into his back jacknife [sic] off the Burnside bridge Thursday afternoon as hundreds of curious Portlanders looked on. It was better than 80 feet down to the river’s oily surface.” The photograph accompanied a story about Moore’s successful dive, headlined “Diver Gives Thrill with Bridge Leap.” This photograph may be related to image No. 372A0629.

Parade on Burnside Bridge

Photograph of a parade crossing the Burnside Bridge in Portland. At the front of the parade are two people carrying a banner with the text “Oregon Journal Juniors / In Portland We Do.” Following them is a small group of people carrying signs that say, “Prevent Fires / ‘In Portland We Do.’ “

Ross Island Bridge from Hood Street

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, taken from Hood Street below the bridge. This photograph was one of four published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated. The photographs were published under the headline “Another Bridge Spans the Flood.” This photograph had the following caption information: “Hood street, passing under the west approach.” The photographs accompanied a story with the headline, “$1,950,000 Ross Island Bridge Open.”

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph, taken from below, of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland. The photograph may have been taken in December 1926, when the bridge was completed; the streetlights on the bridge appear to be decorated as they were for dedication ceremonies on December 21, 1926.

Ross Island Bridge under construction

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland during construction. This photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 14, 1926, under the headline “Ross Island Bridge Steel Spans River.” The photograph had the following caption: “The great center arch span of the new Ross Island bridge, third and last of Portland’s bridge program, was linked yesterday when derricks swung into place the girders that closed the gap. Above is a view of this arch, one of the longest bridges anywhere, as it looked when this girder was dropped into position.” Also see image Nos. 371N5074, 371N5075, 371N5077, and 371N5078, showing the lifting and placement of the girder that joined the bridge’s center arch. Image note: Negative damage at bottom of image.

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, possibly taken in December 1926. A similar photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated.

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