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Oregon Journal Photographic Negatives With digital objects
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Archery golf

Portrait of an unidentified archer drawing his bow, probably during a game or demonstration of archery golf. Behind him, a bag of golf clubs and two bows are leaning on a small table. The following text is painted on the table: “NO 16. / 170. YDS / PAR. 3. BGY. 4. HDP. 16.” Archery golf was adapted from the rules of traditional golf and could be played on either a golf course or a special archery course. Players used a bow and arrow and aimed for targets such as balls or wire circles. Archery golfers sometimes competed against golfers using the standard ball and clubs. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Dolores Mitchell

Half-length portrait of a smiling young girl facing front and wearing a coat. The name “Dolores Mitchell” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

1888 Oregon City suspension bridge?

Photograph, taken from one end, showing a wooden suspension bridge, probably the 1888 bridge over the Willamette River between West Linn and Oregon City. That bridge was replaced with the current arch bridge in 1922. The text “Bridges - Clackamas County” is written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Light leak on negative.

1888 Oregon City suspension bridge?

Photograph, taken from one end, showing a wooden suspension bridge, probably the 1888 bridge over the Willamette River between West Linn and Oregon City. That bridge was replaced with the current arch bridge in 1922. The text “Bridges - Clackamas County” is written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Fawn Brooks holding cake and 4-H prize ribbon

Photograph of Fawn Brooks of Skyline Elementary School holding her prize winning angel-food cake and a prize ribbon. The ribbon bears the 4-H emblem and the text “Boys’ and Girls’ 4-H Clubs / First / Premium /1940.” The photograph was taken at the Multnomah County Fair in Gresham, Oregon and was published in the August 23, 1940 issue of the Oregon Journal.

River steamer Beaver partially submerged after collision

Photograph of the river steamboat Beaver beached and partially submerged in the Willamette River in Portland on November 24, 1931. To the left of the Beaver is the F. W. Mulkey, a harbor patrol tugboat. The Beaver was hit by an ocean steamer, the Admiral Farragut, while unloading cargo at the Admiral Line terminal. None of the Beaver’s crew were injured. A similar photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, November 24, 1931, with a story headlined “Ships Crash in River and One Beached.” Also see image Nos. 371N5191 and 371N5192.

Rat in trap at Admiral terminal in Portland

Photograph of a rat in a trap on a wall. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 8, section 6, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, October 24, 1926. This photograph and two others were published under the headline "War Progresses on the Front." The photograph was captioned: "But the front is the waterfront. Top--Big black rat caught in an ingeniously placed trap along a water line at the Admiral terminal." The photograph accompanied a story with the headline: "Terminal Rats Easy Prey of Expert's Trap." The story described how a man named Daniel Lake had successfully reduced the rat population at the Pacific Steamship company’s Admiral terminal on the Portland waterfront. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Rat in trap at Admiral terminal in Portland

Photograph of a rat in a trap on a wall. A similar photograph was published on Page 8, section 6, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, October 24, 1926. The version printed in the Journal was published with two others under the headline "War Progresses on the Front,” and had the following caption: “But the front is the waterfront. Top--Big black rat caught in an ingeniously placed trap along a water line at the Admiral terminal." The published photograph accompanied a story with the headline: "Terminal Rats Easy Prey of Expert's Trap." The story described how a man named Daniel Lake had successfully reduced the rat population at the Pacific Steamship company’s Admiral terminal on the Portland waterfront. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Crew of river steamer Beaver on shore after collision?

Photograph of a group of unidentified men sitting on the beach near the partially submerged river steamer Beaver on November 24, 1931, in Portland. The men may be members of the Beaver’s crew. The boat was hit by an ocean steamer, the Admiral Farragut, while unloading cargo at the Admiral Line terminal on the Willamette River. None of the Beaver’s crew were injured. The Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the boat collision on Tuesday, November 24, 1931, with the headline “Ships Crash in River and One Beached.” Also see image Nos. 371N5190 and 371N5191.

U. S. Navy ship passing Burnside Bridge, Portland

Photograph showing a United States Navy vessel, hull number 142, passing the Burnside Bridge in Portland. The bridge’s leaves are raised. The ship is also shown in Nos. 372A0810 and 372A0811. Also see image Nos. 372A0807, 372A0809, 372A0812, 372A0813, 372A0814, and 372A0816, which may be related.

Burnside Bridge decorated with flags for dedication ceremony, May 1926

Photograph, taken from the west side of the Willamette River, showing the Burnside Bridge decorated with flags for a dedication ceremony celebrating the bridge’s opening. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Friday, May 28, 1926, the day of the ceremony. The photograph had the following caption: “Much Water Should Run Under This Great Bridge Before It Falls.” The photograph had the following caption: “City celebrates today in honor of opening of Burnside street structure, which, with its approaches, will cost $4,500,000. Regular traffic will be permitted after 7 o’clock tonight, and the afternoon in the meantime is given over to parades, speeches, and loud cheers for the grater elbow room permitted trans-Willamette traffic and the opportunity for commercial development produced by this facility for rapid connection between East and West Sides.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “County and State Unite With City in Bridge Dedication.” Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Burnside Bridge under construction

Photograph, looking northwest, of the Burnside Bridge in Portland during construction, circa 1925. The bridge opened on May 28, 1926; see image Nos. 371N3005 and 371N3006. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Crowd at Burnside Bridge dedication ceremony

Photograph of a crowd beginning to walk over the new Burnside Bridge in Portland during dedication festivities on May 28, 1926. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on May 29, 1926, with the following caption: "A scene snapped as the draw gates were opened and the crowd was allowed to pass over the structure for the first time." The photograph was one of several published together on Page 3 under the headline "Forces of Water and Land Join in Span Dedication."

Crowd watching Ray Woods perform dive off Burnside Bridge

Photograph of a crowd watching diver Ray Moore in midair just below the Burnside Bridge on Thursday, September 6, 1934. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, September 7, 1934, under the headline “Try This One Before Breakfast.” The photograph had the following caption: “To Ray Woods of St. Louis, it’s just like eating corn flakes and cream. Here he is, just going into his back jacknife [sic] off the Burnside bridge Thursday afternoon as hundreds of curious Portlanders looked on. It was better than 80 feet down to the river’s oily surface.” The photograph accompanied a story about Moore’s successful dive, headlined “Diver Gives Thrill with Bridge Leap.” This photograph may be related to image No. 372A0629.

Parade on Burnside Bridge

Photograph of a parade crossing the Burnside Bridge in Portland. At the front of the parade are two people carrying a banner with the text “Oregon Journal Juniors / In Portland We Do.” Following them is a small group of people carrying signs that say, “Prevent Fires / ‘In Portland We Do.’ “

Ross Island Bridge from Hood Street

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, taken from Hood Street below the bridge. This photograph was one of four published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated. The photographs were published under the headline “Another Bridge Spans the Flood.” This photograph had the following caption information: “Hood street, passing under the west approach.” The photographs accompanied a story with the headline, “$1,950,000 Ross Island Bridge Open.”

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph, taken from below, of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland. The photograph may have been taken in December 1926, when the bridge was completed; the streetlights on the bridge appear to be decorated as they were for dedication ceremonies on December 21, 1926.

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