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Ross Island Bridge

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, possibly taken in December 1926. A similar photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated.

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph, taken from below, of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland. The photograph may have been taken in December 1926, when the bridge was completed; the streetlights on the bridge appear to be decorated as they were for dedication ceremonies on December 21, 1926.

Ross Island Bridge under construction

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland during construction. This photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 14, 1926, under the headline “Ross Island Bridge Steel Spans River.” The photograph had the following caption: “The great center arch span of the new Ross Island bridge, third and last of Portland’s bridge program, was linked yesterday when derricks swung into place the girders that closed the gap. Above is a view of this arch, one of the longest bridges anywhere, as it looked when this girder was dropped into position.” Also see image Nos. 371N5074, 371N5075, 371N5077, and 371N5078, showing the lifting and placement of the girder that joined the bridge’s center arch. Image note: Negative damage at bottom of image.

Willamette River and Ross Island Bridge

Photograph looking south, showing docks and a boat on the Willamette River, with the Ross Island Bridge in the distance. On the dock (barge) is “Diesel Towing Co.” (negative 12 of 25). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Hawthorne Ave.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Joining of center arch, Ross Island Bridge

Photograph of unidentified workers guiding a steel girder into place during construction of the Ross Island Bridge on September 13, 1926. The girder joined the two pieces of the bridge’s center arch. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal that day. The photograph had the headline “Gap in Ross Island Bridge Closed” and the caption “Swinging girder on north side of center span into place. Contractor J. H. Pomeroy at left.” The photograph accompanied a story on the same page, headlined “Gap is Closed in Ross Island Span.” Also see image Nos. 371N5074, 371N5077, and 371N5078.

Joining of center arch, Ross Island Bridge

Photograph of unidentified workers guiding a steel girder into place during construction of the Ross Island Bridge on September 13, 1926. The girder joined the two pieces of the bridge’s center arch. The second man from left may be contractor J. H. Pomeroy. A similar photograph, image No. 371N5074, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on September 13, 1926. Also see image 371N5077 and 371N5078.

Ross Island Bridge from Hood Street

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, taken from Hood Street below the bridge. This photograph was one of four published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated. The photographs were published under the headline “Another Bridge Spans the Flood.” This photograph had the following caption information: “Hood street, passing under the west approach.” The photographs accompanied a story with the headline, “$1,950,000 Ross Island Bridge Open.”

Aerial view of Willamette River and Ross Island Bridge, Portland

An aerial view, looking south, showing the Willamette River and the Ross Island Bridge in Portland. Ross Island can be seen just south of the bridge, with numerous timber rafts floating on the water. A timber mill can be seen on the east side of the river, next to a set of train tracks. Photographed with a K-25 camera (negative 7 of 14).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Western Foundry Co. Warehouse

Western Foundry Co. warehouse, SW Water Avenue, west end of Ross Island Bridge. SW Caruthers Court. Large wood piles outside warehouse. One sign reads “Ross Island Fuel / Dry Wood $4.50 Load.” Also advertisements for Coca-Cola, 7Up, and Double Cola.

White, Minor

Aerial view of Southeast Portland

An aerial view, looking north, showing Southeast Portland and the Willamette River. Bridges can be seen crossing the river, including the Ross Island Bridge, Hawthorne Bridge, and Steel Bridge. At the center of the frame is large train yard. Photographed with a K-25 camera (negative 10 of 14).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Western Foundry Co. Warehouse

Western Foundry Co. warehouse, SW Water Avenue, west end of Ross Island Bridge. SW Caruthers Court. Advertisements for Coca-Cola, 7Up, Double Cola, Philip Morris, and Camel.

White, Minor

Aerial view of Willamette River, Portland

An aerial view of the Willamette River in Portland, looking south. The Broadway, Steel, and Burnside Bridges can be seen spanning the river. The Ross Island Bridge is also visible in the distance. Downtown Portland can be seen at the right side of the frame (negative 10 of 12).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Lillian Porter Say, Washington D.C. correspondent for Oregon Journal

A portrait of Lillian Porter Say, Oregon Journal correspondent for Washington D.C. She stands with one arm on a stone railing, with the Willamette River and the Ross Island Bridge in the background. A similar cropped photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Friday, November 4, 1949 (negative 2 of 2).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

View of Multnomah County Courthouse, Hawthorne Bridge, and downtown Portland buildings

Photograph, taken from a high angle and looking toward the southeast, showing part of downtown Portland. At top is the Willamette River; the Hawthorne Bridge is at upper left and the Ross Island Bridge is visible in the background at upper right. The street at on the lower left side of the image Salmon Street (now Southwest Salmon Street). At center left is the Hotel Geneva at 2nd and Salmon, and in the foreground at right is the Multnomah County Courthouse at 4th and Salmon. The photograph may have been taken from the top of the Public Service Building. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Oral history interview with Emil Feltz, by Jim Poplack [Transcript]

Transcript. Emil Feltz discusses his childhood in the Brooklyn Neighborhood. He was born in 1900 in Portland Heights, where his father worked for the Portland Traction company. In 1909, his family was convinced to move to the Brooklyn area by Father Gregory of the Sacred Heart Church, and Feltz spent most of the rest of his life there. He talks about how his father helped build Oaks Park, how he and his friends would ice skate in Oaks Bottom in the winter, and swim to Ross Island in the summer. He also talks about how the neighborhood has changed during the period of 1909 to 1976, and his thoughts on the future of the neighborhood.

Feltz, Emil, 1900-1982

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Swan Island Edition, Volume 05, Number 18

Employee newspaper for Swan Island Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; an article on Kaiser shipyards tuberculosis survey; the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; an article on K-9 War Dog Smokey’s Oregon Shipyard visit; the Worker Speaks column; an article on Swan Island Shipyard’s need for ship repair craftsmen; an article on closure of Swan Island Shipyard barracks; an article on Northwest recreational fishing; an article on importance of safety goggles.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Swan Island Edition, Volume 05, Number 21

Employee newspaper for Swan Island Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on Vancouver housing being moved to other sites; an article on Henry J. Kaiser’s plans to develop a Pacific coast steel industry; an article on availability of Vancouver area postwar housing; an article on United States Maritime Commission Vice Admiral Howard L. Vickery’s Kaiser shipyards visit; an article on Vancouver Shipyard built aircraft carrier, the U. S. S. Guadalcanal, capture of a German U-boat; an article on shoe rations; the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; an article on Swan Island Shipyard winning the Tanker Champ Flag; an article on Swan Island Shipyard Child Service Center; an article on postwar job opportunities; an article on Labor-Management Suggestion contest winners and their achievements; an article on Maritime Day celebrations; an article on Swan Island Shipyard Shopping Center.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

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