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Eye examination?

Photograph showing two unidentified men, possibly during an eye examination. The man on the left is holding a piece of equipment, and the man on the right is looking into the device.

Law enforcement officers with crime suspect?

Photograph showing three unidentified men standing in a row and facing slightly left. The man at center appears to be wearing a badge. The photograph may show a law enforcement officer or officers with a crime suspect. See related image Nos. 371N3571, 371N3572, 371N3574, 371N3576, 377N0478, and 379G0184.

Law enforcement officer or crime suspect?

Head and shoulders photograph, taken outdoors, of an unidentified man looking to left. The man could be a law enforcement officer or a crime suspect in custody. See related image Nos. 371N3571, 371N3572, 371N3574, 371N3576, 377N0564, and 379G0184. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Crime scene?

Photograph of a kitchen. Hanging next to the stove is a long hose; one end of the hose is inside the stove. A blanket is crumpled on the floor in front of the stove. The photograph may have been taken at a crime scene, but the location and context are unidentified.

Crime scene?

Photograph of a bedroom in disarray. The bed is covered with feathers and the dresser drawers are stacked on the floor. On the bed are an open box and a man’s hat resting on the box lid. The photograph may have been taken at a crime scene, but the location and context are unidentified.

Senti family barn, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family barn near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his wife. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Barn in which the body of Mrs. Senti was found.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A similar photograph, image No. 371N3380, was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” The photograph of Trixie had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti's fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875. Image note: Photograph is out of focus.

Senti family home, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family house near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his children. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “The house in which the family lived on a small farm.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Osbourne, seated in courtroom

Portrait, taken from the side, showing a man sitting in a chair in a courtroom with his hands in his pockets. Two unidentified men are sitting at a table next to him, and a crowd of people are sitting and standing in the background. The name “Osbourne” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. The man may be Joseph John Osbourne, a Portland special police officer who was tried and convicted of murdering Simon Mish of Portland. Mish, age 70, was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. See related image No. 371N1932. Also see image Nos. 372A0795 and 372A0796, which were taken during Osbourne’s trial.

Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and Buck Lieuallen after Hickman’s capture

Photograph of Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen in Pendleton, probably on December 22, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, December 23, 1927. The photograph was published under the headline and subhead "Doubling Back Was Fatal to Fugitive / Conclusion of Manhunt That Reached Over the Entire Length of Pacific Coast." The photograph had the following caption: "Above, left to right, Tom Gurdane, Pendleton chief of police, captor; William Edward Hickman, prisoner; Traffic Sergeant Buck Lieuallen, captor." Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, and 373G0076.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "Hickman's arrival at Portland jail." The photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3579, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to man on left), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to third man from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "The prisoner securely handcuffed as he alighted from train at Montavilla Sunday evening." This photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3581, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

Crime suspect or suspects?

Photograph showing two unidentified men standing side by side. The man at right is holding a cigar and looking to the right. Either or both of the men may be crime suspects in custody. See related image Nos. 371N3571, 371N3572, 371N3574, 377N0478, 377N0564, and 379G0184.

Law enforcement officers with crime suspects or suspects?

Photograph showing six unidentified men standing in a row in the street outside a building. The second man from left appears to be wearing a badge. The photograph may show a law enforcement officer or officers with a crime suspect or suspects. See related image Nos. 371N3571, 371N3572, 371N3576, 377N0478, 377N0564, and 379G0184.

Law enforcement officers with crime suspects or suspects?

Photograph showing six unidentified men standing in a row in the street outside a building. At far left, another unidentified man is shaking hands with one of the men in the row; that man appears to be wearing a badge. The photograph may show a law enforcement officer or officers with a crime suspect or suspects. See related image Nos. 371N3571, 371N3573, 371N3576, 377N0478, 377N0564, and 379G0184.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (front, left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish?

Photograph showing a telephone table in the corner of a room. The table and nearby wall molding are covered with what appears to be blood. A framed photograph is hanging on the wall next to the telephone. The photograph may have been taken at the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered there and found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. The wallpaper in this photograph appears to be the same as in image No. 371N3516, showing Mish’s dining room, where he was killed. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish’s killing.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish

Photograph showing dining room crime scene in the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered while playing solitaire at his table and was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish's killing. See image No. 371N3518, which may also have been taken in Mish’s home after his death.

Hatchet used by Tobias Senti in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the hatchet used by Tobias Senti to kill his wife and children. The hatchet is held up by an unidentified person; only the person’s hand is in the frame. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hatchet with which Senti killed his wife and children.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Letter by Albert D. Glibert, killer of mill superintendent John W. Bevis

Photograph of a letter by mill worker Albert D. Glibert, handwritten before he shot and killed John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman-Poulsen mill in Portland, on February 28, 1931. Glibert had been laid off from his job at the mill. The letter reads: “Possibly due to the terrible condition and unfairness of the dominative class, it is time for a proof or demonstration that some drastic measure must be used so as to effect enough changes to permit all the working people a chance for a living, no use to wait for the favored ones that have plenty to bring any suddent [sic] improvement many of the working people will be starved if it depend [sic] on the satified [sic] to make any changes with out [sic] being forced to do so. I have been treated unfairly and I know it / A. D. Glibert.” A photograph of the letter and image No. 371N0923, a portrait of Glibert, were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on March 1, 1931, under the headline “Slayer and Death Note.” The photograph of the letter had the following caption: “The letter which Albert D. Glibert handed to John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman-Poulsen mill, before Glibert shot and killed him Saturday morning indicates that Glibert had been brooding over his discharge from the plant and blamed Bevis for it. The missive is pictured here.” Later, on July 30, 1931, the Journal reported that Glibert had pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison. The Journal reported that the plea followed a trial on first-degree murder charges in which the jury was unable to agree on a verdict.

Osbourne, seated in courtroom

Portrait, taken from the side, showing a man sitting in a chair in a courtroom with his hands in his pockets. A crowd of people is seated in the background. The name “Osbourne” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. The man may be Joseph John Osbourne, a Portland special police officer who was tried and convicted of murdering Simon Mish of Portland. Mish, age 70, was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. See related image No. 371N3607. Also see image Nos. 372A0795 and 372A0796, which were taken during Osbourne’s trial.

Peggy Norman, witness to murder of boxer Johnny Hansen

Half-length portrait of a young woman, Peggy Norman, a witness to the murder of boxer Johnny Hansen at the LaVelle Hotel in Portland. Norman is sitting in a chair with her arms folded in her lap. She is facing right, looking toward the front, and wearing a hat and fur stole. The photograph was taken on March 2, 1932, the day of Hansen’s death. It was published on Page 17 of the Oregon Journal on the same day, accompanying the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Prizefight Star Shot And Killed.” The story reported that the suspect in Hansen’s death was another boxer, Jack Kentworth. The story reported: “According to the story told police, Kentworth called at the LaVelle hotel room in which were Hansen and Miss Norman, drew a gun, threatened to kill them both, and then fired the one shot into Hansen’s body.” The story also reported that Peggy Norman and Kentworth had shared a room at the hotel from September until two weeks before the day of Hansen’s murder, when they separated and she moved into a different room. See related image No. 371N1891. Image note: The name “Peggy Norman” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Peggy Norman, witness to murder of boxer Johnny Hansen

Head and shoulders portrait of a young woman, Peggy Norman, a witness to the murder of boxer Johnny Hansen at the LaVelle Hotel in Portland. Norman is facing front, looking toward the right, and wearing a hat and fur stole. The photograph was taken on March 2, 1932, the day of Hansen’s death. A front-page story and a related photograph, image No. 371N1892, were published in the Oregon Journal the same day. The story, headlined “Prizefight Star Shot And Killed,” reported that the suspect in Hansen’s death was another boxer, Jack Kentworth. The Journal reported: “According to the story told police, Kentworth called at the LaVelle hotel room in which were Hansen and Miss Norman, drew a gun, threatened to kill them both, and then fired the one shot into Hansen’s body.” The story also reported that Peggy Norman and Kentworth had shared a room at the hotel from September until two weeks before the day of Hansen’s murder, when they separated and she moved into a different room. Image note: The name “Peggy Norman” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

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