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William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946 United States Hunting
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Wild ducks conservation

Manuscript in which the author describes the need for duck conservation in Oregon due to hunting. Duck hunters want the season to be longer, which is reflected in a new game bill that was introduced in the Senate (Senate Bill 99) and the House of Representatives (House Bill 108). The document asks the Oregonian to "raise its voice" in response to the duck hunters.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Plume hunting

Manuscript in which the author describes the brutal practice of plume hunting. Observations of grebes are also recorded.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

La Prath

Manuscript describing the activities of La Prath, a French-Canadian professional hunter. The author details the places, types of birds, and compensation.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Notes on grebe skin traffic

Manuscript describing the plight of the western grebe being hunted for their durable skin. The document describes the hunters' realization of the diminishing bird population.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

After heron

Manuscript describing the author's understanding of the plumage hunters' motivation. The author lays the blame of demand of plumage at the feet of plumage dealers, milliners, and the women who buy plumage.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The trail of the plume hunters

Manuscript that is compiled of various excerpts. The main focus of the manuscript is the devastation of bird populations due to plumage hunting for fashion and other interests.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Grebe hunting

Manuscript discussing the hunting of Western grebes in the name of plumage.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The white heron

Manuscript detailing the pursuit of photographing white herons. The author describes concerns regarding the decreased population due to plume hunting. Also included is a page about bluebirds.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Plight of grebes

Manuscript containing excerpts from the "Plume hunting", "Grebe hunting", and "Notes on grebe skin traffic" manuscripts. This document further expands upon the motivation of plume hunting. Author also provides physical description, observations of behavior, and figurative description of some specimens in the wild.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Hunting grebes

Manuscript that shares a few excerpts from "Plight of grebes", focusing on why grebes have been singled out for their plumage.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Saving from the slaughter

Manuscript that makes a case to stop plume hunting. Author describes a sad scene of grebe bodies littering a lake site in the aftermath of hunting.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Federal courts uphold migratory bird regulations

Manuscript recalling when hunters and sportsmen attempted to prove that migratory regulations signed by President Roosevelt were unconstitutional. Two cases are mentioned, one from Kentucky involving Judge Ford, the second in Illinois with Judge Major. Both upheld the regulations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Needless destruction of game resources

Manuscript that explores the senseless killing of wild animals. Despite being a protected animal, a black bear mother and cub had been shot down. The author contends that black bears are the most human of wild animals in the Oregon woods. The author also describes characteristics of the bear and what it eats. The document goes on to say that there are people who simply enjoy being out in nature and can truly appreciate a wildlife sighting. However, due to hunters, those people are robbed of these experiences.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Records of ducks over baited waters

Manuscript that delves into the game records for duck hunting, finding that the two states with the largest number of birds bagged were permitted to use bait. The author explains that the reason why there was such a concentration of birds in California and Illinois, is that they lie on the most naturally attractive waterways. Other states are mentioned, but the main focus is on California and Illinois. The document goes on to say that the practice of baiting creates an unfair advantage and those that do not bait tend to later follow after seeing the baiters' success. The federal government banned the use of bait in respects to duck hunting.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Waterfowl protection and other manuscripts

Manuscript that is composed of various manuscripts, with a focus on closing the waterfowl hunting season. The manuscripts concerning the waterfowl include creating legislation to close or limit the hunting season, the practice of baiting, and protecting waterfowl populations. A manuscript discussing russet-backed thrushes is included.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Manuscripts and report

Manuscripts for article, "Our largest migratory bird", and a report on trumpeter swans by David D. Condon, Assistant Yellowstone Park Naturalist.

Del Condon, David

Elk or wapiti of Oregon

Article discussing elk populations in Oregon, including hunting seasons and the transfer of an elk herd from Jackson Hole, Wyoming to the Wallowa National Forest.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

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