Print preview Close

Showing 226 results

Collections
Electric utilities--Oregon
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

213 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman

  • SR 11275
  • Collection
  • 2005-04-05 - 2005-04-25

In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father. He discusses his mother's remarriage and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014

Oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson

This oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson was conducted by Thomas Wright at Davidson's home in Portland, Oregon, from December 2, 1994, to January 24, 1995. In this interview, Davidson discusses his family background and early life in Lafayette, Louisiana, including detailed descriptions of the plantations his extended family owned; his ancestors' involvement in the Confederate Army; his early education; and spending summers in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also briefly addresses the racism he learned in his childhood and confronting his prejudices later in life, and describes segregation in southern Louisiana. He also discusses the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. He talks about attending the Southwestern Louisiana Institute and studying law at Tulane University and at Yale Law School.

Davidson discusses working as an attorney for the Tennessee Valley Authority. He talks about rural electrification and legal battles with private electrical utilities. He talks about practicing law in Lafayette, Louisiana, and his marriage to Mercedes Hester. He discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, to work as a consultant to the Bonneville Power Administration. He speaks at length about his work for the War Production Board during World War II. Davidson also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; serving as assistant secretary of the interior in the Truman administration; and his efforts toward creating a Columbia Valley Authority.

Davidson, C. Girard (Crowe Girard), 1910-

Oral history interview with Dick Eymann

This oral history interview with Dick Eymann was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Emerald PUD in Eugene, Oregon, from December 2, 1993, to September 8, 1994. In the interview, Eymann discusses his family background and early life in Saskatchewan, Canada; Scottsbluff, Nebraska; LaSalle, Colorado; Linton, North Dakota; Dallas and Portland, Oregon; and Anaheim, California. He also talks about his experiences studying political science at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, including his early political beliefs and registering as a Democrat. Eymann describes being drafted immediately after college and his experience as a U.S. Air Force airman in the Pacific theater during World War II, including training; deployment to Manila Bay, Philippines, and Okinawa, Japan; his thoughts on the atomic bomb; and serving with African-Americans. He then discusses raising a large family; working for the Weyerhaeuser Company in Springfield, Oregon, and his acquaintance with George Weyerhaeuser; and living on a chicken farm.

Eymann describes his experience representing Lane County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation he worked on, including on taxation, particularly attempts to pass a sales tax; electrical utilities and nuclear power; Lane Community College; and agricultural labor laws. He also speaks about his tenure as speaker of the House. He describes his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party and campaigning. He also discusses some of the people he worked with in the Oregon Legislature, including Keith Skelton, Clarence Barton, Nancy Fadeley, Debbs Potts, Jason Boe, Pat Dooley, and Stafford Hansell. Eymann relates his experience working under various Oregon governors, including Bob Holmes, Mark Hatfield, and Tom McCall. He closes the interview by discussing his life after politics, including his career with the Emerald People's Utility District in Lane County, Oregon.

Eymann, Dick (Richard Oswald), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project. Between the two sessions is an incomplete segment from a panel discussion regarding the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada. The discussion, held circa 1990, is moderated by Gordon Gulp, with an introductory speech by Charles F. Luce.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with Jill Eiland

This oral history interview with Jill Eiland was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 21, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In this interview, Eiland discusses her work as director of federal affairs at Portland General Electric. She describes her job duties, including lobbying the U.S. Congress; talks about the people who had previously held her position; and discusses how the job has changed. She talks about some of the legislation PGE lobbied for and against. She also discusses PGE's relationship with Native American communities. She then talks about her decision to leave Washington, D.C., in 1985 to return to Oregon, and discusses how her job duties changed. She closes the interview by talking about philanthropic work and volunteering in the Portland community by PGE employees; about public opinion of PGE; and about how the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant sets PGE apart from other electric utilities.

Eiland, Jill W. (Jill Wissler), 1951-

Oral history interview with Arthur Olmstead

This oral history interview with Arthur Olmstead was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 20, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In this interview, Olmstead discusses his career as general plant manager of the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant for Portland General Electric. He begins by suggesting names of other people to interview to Judy Hartman. He then describes the day-to-day operations of the Trojan plant, safety planning, and working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. He speaks at length about the public sentiment against nuclear power, particularly after the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl disasters, and the future of nuclear power plants. He describes the current operating condition of Trojan, plant maintenance, and PGE's transparency with the press. He discusses how Trojan compares to other nuclear power plants in the United States, and talks about how Trojan's staff makes the plant unique. He describes how the plant handles emergency situations, such as storms and power outages. He closes the interview by talking about the importance of Trojan to PGE.

Olmstead, C. Arthur (Clyde Arthur), 1939-

Oral history interview with John L. Frewing

This oral history interview with John Frewing was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 18, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In the interview, Frewing discusses working in Portland General Electric's nuclear division and working on the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant. He talks about the construction of the Trojan plant and shares his reasons for leaving the nuclear division. He discusses the competition between private and public electric utilities in the Pacific Northwest, PGE's relationship with the people of Portland, and the company's workplace culture. He closes the interview by talking about his hopes for an upcoming book about PGE, "Electrifying Eden."

Frewing, John L. (John Lewis), 1940-

Oral history interview with Tim Bracy

This oral history interview with Tim Bracy was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 14, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In this interview, Bracy discusses his career with Portland General Electric working as manager of Health and Safety Services. He talks about the culture of hydroelectric plant workers coming to work while injured or sick, the measures he took to ensure worker safety, and legislation regarding worker safety.

The audio recording ends prematurely. In an addendum to the transcript, Bracy provides his written recollections of what he discussed during the remainder of the interview. Bracy writes about changes in the policies and procedures of PGE's health and safety services during his career. He talks about company nurses, employee health insurance, and how the opening of the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant changed the company. He then describes his accomplishments; talks about working as security supervisor at Trojan; and discusses public opinion regarding Trojan.

Bracy, Tim (Timothy Ford), 1944-2014

Oral history interview with Don Kielblock

This oral history interview with Don Kielblock was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 13, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." The audio for this interview is incomplete, but the entire interview is included in the transcript.

In this interview, Kielblock discusses the strategic planning behind the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant. He talks about the early operation of the plant, navigating the early nuclear power regulations, and how public opinion regarding the plant has changed. He describes experiencing protests against Trojan. He talks about working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; about the staff at Trojan; and about changes in PGE company culture. He also talks about changes in public opinion regarding PGE. He describes his job duties as a permit agent during his early career with PGE; talks about his involvement with the employee union; and laments the different expectations that newer employees have for the company. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the future of PGE.

Kielblock, Don (Donald F.), 1941-

Oral history interview with Sam R. Christensen

This oral history interview with Sam R. Christensen was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 12, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In this interview, Christensen discusses his career at Portland General Electric as an engineer. He describes his job duties and the organizational structure of PGE's engineering departments, and he talks about the construction of several of PGE's hydroelectric plants. He also talks about the construction of the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant and the uncompleted construction of the Pebble Springs nuclear power plant. He discusses how PGE as a company has changed during his career, the maintenance of PGE's power plants, and his thoughts on the future of the company.

The interview transcript includes two addendums: a 1988 list of jobs the PGE engineers were currently working on, and a 1988 article entitled "Dimming our Electric Future."

Christensen, Sam R. (Samuel Rodney), 1928-2009

Oral history interview with Hillman Lueddemann, Jr.

This oral history interview with Hillman Lueddemann, Jr., was conducted by Judy Hartman and Craig Wollner on November 20, 1987. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden."

In this interview, Lueddemann discusses his father, Hillman Lueddemann, Sr., including his service on the Portland General Electric board. He then speaks about his own career at PGE from 1964 to the time of the interview in 1987. He discusses beginning his career as manager of commercial development, describes his job responsibilities, and talks about PGE's sales strategies. He talks about PGE's relationship with the community it serves, and how the relationship has changed over the years. He discusses customers' frustration over high rates, PGE's involvement in the Portland Rose Festival, and working with Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt and U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield. He talks about the management styles and personalities of PGE presidents Frank Manley Warren and Bob Short. He also discusses the design of the World Trade Center in downtown Portland, where PGE has its headquarters. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the future of PGE.

Lueddemann, Hillman, Jr., 1924-2017

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins, by Jim Strassmaier [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins’ office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father’s career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice law suits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Allan Hart [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart’s office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father’s law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of the BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon’s efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce

  • SR 1571
  • Collection
  • 1984-09-07 - 1984-11-20

This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project.

Between the two sessions is an incomplete segment from a panel discussion regarding the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada. The discussion, held circa 1990, is moderated by Gordon Gulp, with an introductory speech by Charles F. Luce.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 1984, Luce discusses the Columbia River Treaty, including his own role as a negotiator, the terms of the treaty, and other members of the negotiating team. He talks about attempts to sell surplus power to California and Idaho, opposition to the Columbia River Treaty, and the long term benefits of the treaty. He closes the interview by talking about the early plans for Bonneville that he helped put together when he first began working at BPA in 1944.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson [Sound Recording 12]

Tape 6, Side 2. This oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson was conducted by Thomas Wright at Davidson’s home in Portland, Oregon, from December 2, 1994, to January 24, 1995. In this interview, Davidson discusses his family background and early life in Lafayette, Louisiana, including detailed descriptions of the plantations his extended family owned; his ancestors’ involvement in the Confederate Army; his early education; and spending summers in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also briefly addresses the racism he learned in his childhood and confronting his prejudices later in life, and describes segregation in southern Louisiana. He also discusses the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. He talks about attending the Southwestern Louisiana Institute and studying law at Tulane University and at Yale Law School.Davidson discusses working as an attorney for the Tennessee Valley Authority. He talks about rural electrification and legal battles with private electrical utilities. He talks about practicing law in Lafayette, Louisiana and his marriage to Mercedes Hester. He discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, to work as a consultant to the Bonneville Power Administration. He speaks at length about his work for the War Production Board during World War II. Davidson also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; serving as assistant secretary of the interior in the Truman administration; and his efforts toward creating a Columbia Valley Authority.

Davidson, C. Girard (Crowe Girard), 1910-

Oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson [Sound Recording 14]

Tape 7, Side 2. This oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson was conducted by Thomas Wright at Davidson’s home in Portland, Oregon, from December 2, 1994, to January 24, 1995. In this interview, Davidson discusses his family background and early life in Lafayette, Louisiana, including detailed descriptions of the plantations his extended family owned; his ancestors’ involvement in the Confederate Army; his early education; and spending summers in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also briefly addresses the racism he learned in his childhood and confronting his prejudices later in life, and describes segregation in southern Louisiana. He also discusses the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. He talks about attending the Southwestern Louisiana Institute and studying law at Tulane University and at Yale Law School.Davidson discusses working as an attorney for the Tennessee Valley Authority. He talks about rural electrification and legal battles with private electrical utilities. He talks about practicing law in Lafayette, Louisiana and his marriage to Mercedes Hester. He discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, to work as a consultant to the Bonneville Power Administration. He speaks at length about his work for the War Production Board during World War II. Davidson also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; serving as assistant secretary of the interior in the Truman administration; and his efforts toward creating a Columbia Valley Authority.

Davidson, C. Girard (Crowe Girard), 1910-

Oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson [Sound Recording 17]

Tape 9, Side 1. This oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson was conducted by Thomas Wright at Davidson’s home in Portland, Oregon, from December 2, 1994, to January 24, 1995. In this interview, Davidson discusses his family background and early life in Lafayette, Louisiana, including detailed descriptions of the plantations his extended family owned; his ancestors’ involvement in the Confederate Army; his early education; and spending summers in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also briefly addresses the racism he learned in his childhood and confronting his prejudices later in life, and describes segregation in southern Louisiana. He also discusses the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. He talks about attending the Southwestern Louisiana Institute and studying law at Tulane University and at Yale Law School.Davidson discusses working as an attorney for the Tennessee Valley Authority. He talks about rural electrification and legal battles with private electrical utilities. He talks about practicing law in Lafayette, Louisiana and his marriage to Mercedes Hester. He discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, to work as a consultant to the Bonneville Power Administration. He speaks at length about his work for the War Production Board during World War II. Davidson also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; serving as assistant secretary of the interior in the Truman administration; and his efforts toward creating a Columbia Valley Authority.

Davidson, C. Girard (Crowe Girard), 1910-

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father; his mother’s remarriage; and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions. In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 1984, Luce discusses the Columbia River Treaty, including his own role as a negotiator, the terms of the treaty, and other members of the negotiating team. He talks about attempts to sell surplus power to California and Idaho, opposition to the Columbia River Treaty, and the long term benefits of the treaty. He closes the interview by talking about the early plans for Bonneville that he helped put together when he first began working at BPA in 1944.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with Hillman Lueddemann, Jr. [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Hillman Lueddemann, Jr., was conducted by Judy Hartman and Craig Wollner on November 20, 1987. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." In this interview, Lueddemann discusses his father, Hillman Lueddemann, Sr., including his service on the Portland General Electric board. He then speaks about his own career at PGE from 1964 to the time of the interview in 1987. He discusses beginning his career as manager of commercial development, describes his job responsibilities, and talks about PGE's sales strategies. He talks about PGE's relationship with the community it serves, and how the relationship has changed over the years. He discusses customers' frustration over high rates, PGE's involvement in the Portland Rose Festival, and working with Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt and U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield. He talks about the management styles and personalities of PGE presidents Frank Manley Warren and Bob Short. He also discusses the design of the World Trade Center in downtown Portland, where PGE has its headquarters. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the future of PGE.

Lueddemann, Hillman, Jr., 1924-2017

Oral history interview with John L. Frewing [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with John Frewing was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 18, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." In the interview, Frewing discusses working in Portland General Electric's nuclear division and working on the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant. He talks about the construction of the Trojan plant and shares his reasons for leaving the nuclear division. He discusses the competition between private and public electric utilities in the Pacific Northwest, PGE's relationship with the people of Portland, and the company's workplace culture. He closes the interview by talking about his hopes for an upcoming book about PGE, "Electrifying Eden."

Frewing, John L. (John Lewis), 1940-

Oral history interview with Tim Bracy [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tim Bracy was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 14, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." In this interview, Bracy discusses his career with Portland General Electric working as manager of Health and Safety Services. He talks about the culture of hydroelectric plant workers coming to work while injured or sick, the measures he took to ensure worker safety, and legislation regarding worker safety. The audio recording ends prematurely. In an addendum to the transcript, Bracy provides his written recollections of what he discussed during the remainder of the interview. Bracy writes about changes in the policies and procedures of PGE's health and safety services during his career. He talks about company nurses, employee health insurance, and how the opening of the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant changed the company. He then describes his accomplishments; talks about working as security supervisor at Trojan; and discusses public opinion regarding Trojan.

Bracy, Tim (Timothy Ford), 1944-2014

Oral history interview with Jill Eiland [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jill Eiland was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 21, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." In this interview, Eiland discusses her work as director of federal affairs at Portland General Electric. She describes her job duties, including lobbying the U.S. Congress; talks about the people who had previously held her position; and discusses how the job has changed. She talks about some of the legislation PGE lobbied for and against. She also discusses PGE's relationship with Native American communities. She then talks about her decision to leave Washington, D.C., in 1985 to return to Oregon, and discusses how her job duties changed. She closes the interview by talking about philanthropic work and volunteering in the Portland community by PGE employees; about public opinion of PGE; and about how the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant sets PGE apart from other electric utilities.

Eiland, Jill W. (Jill Wissler), 1951-

Oral history interview with Jill Eiland [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Jill Eiland was conducted by Judy Hartman on January 21, 1988. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series, which marked PGE's 100th anniversary and was used in the writing of the book "Electrifying Eden." In this interview, Eiland discusses her work as director of federal affairs at Portland General Electric. She describes her job duties, including lobbying the U.S. Congress; talks about the people who had previously held her position; and discusses how the job has changed. She talks about some of the legislation PGE lobbied for and against. She also discusses PGE's relationship with Native American communities. She then talks about her decision to leave Washington, D.C., in 1985 to return to Oregon, and discusses how her job duties changed. She closes the interview by talking about philanthropic work and volunteering in the Portland community by PGE employees; about public opinion of PGE; and about how the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant sets PGE apart from other electric utilities.

Eiland, Jill W. (Jill Wissler), 1951-

Oral history interview with Dick Eymann [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Dick Eymann was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Emerald PUD in Eugene, Oregon, from December 2, 1993, to September 8, 1994. In the interview, Eymann discusses his family background and early life in Saskatchewan, Canada; Scottsbluff, Nebraska; LaSalle, Colorado; Linton, North Dakota; Dallas and Portland, Oregon; and Anaheim, California. He also talks about his experiences studying political science at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, including his early political beliefs and registering as a Democrat. Eymann describes being drafted immediately after college and his experience as a U.S. Air Force airman in the Pacific theater during World War II, including training; deployment to Manila Bay, Philippines, and Okinawa, Japan; his thoughts on the atomic bomb; and serving with African-Americans. He then discusses raising a large family; working for the Weyerhaeuser Company in Springfield, Oregon, and his acquaintance with George Weyerhaeuser; and living on a chicken farm. Eymann describes his experience representing Lane County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation his worked on, including on taxation, particularly attempts to pass a sales tax; electrical utilities and nuclear power; Lane Community College; agricultural labor laws; and his tenure as speaker of the House. He describes his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party and campaigning. He also discusses some of the people he worked with in the Oregon Legislature, including Keith Skelton, Clarence Barton, Nancy Fadeley, Debbs Potts, Jason Boe, Pat Dooley, and Stafford Hansell. Eymann relates his experience working under various Oregon governors, including Bob Holmes, Mark Hatfield, and Tom McCall. He closes the interview by discussing his life after politics, including his career with the Emerald People's Utility District in Lane County, Oregon.

Eymann, Dick (Richard Oswald), 1919-2005

Results 1 to 28 of 226