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Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

  • SR 1249
  • Collection
  • 1981-03-19 - 1981-03-19

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Linda Dodds in Frye's chambers in Portland, Oregon, on March 19, 1981. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Klamath County, Oregon. She talks about the difficult experience of a huge change in her family situation as a child, when she was reunited with her mother and brother after having been raised entirely by her grandparents. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including influential professors, and meeting and marrying William Frye. She talks about raising a family and how postpartum depression drove her to start her teaching career. She also discusses her involvement in politics, including William Frye's political campaigns. She then talks about attending the University of Oregon law school in 1963, including other women in her class, balancing family life, and starting to practice law.

She describes becoming a judge for the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall and her later campaign. She talks about how her gender affected the way defendants perceived her. She also discusses how this new position affected her marriage and her divorce in 1975. She talks briefly about serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She closes the interview by discussing her current family life in 1981 and her plans for the future.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre

  • SR 812
  • Collection
  • 1989-10-06 - 1990-01-12

This oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre was conducted by Vinita M. Howard at Eyre's home in Salem, Oregon, from October 6, 1989, to January 12, 1990. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 6, 1989, Eyre discusses her family background and early life in Buckley, Illinois. She talks about a family trip to Oregon in 1902 and tells a story about an escaped prisoner who was making headlines at the time. She discusses her first year of school in Illinois. She then talks about life in Salem, Oregon, including the family banking business, the family home, and their neighborhood. She also talks about her education in Salem.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 12, 1989, Eyre continues discussing the family home and neighborhood in Salem, and describes features that were common in houses in the early 20th century, particularly woodsheds. She talks about her education in Salem; describes the old Capitol building and businesses in downtown Salem; and talks about the family's first car. She also briefly talks about some of the floods that affected Marion County in the early 20th century. She talks about anti-Semitic attitudes, popular fashions, and attending church. She speaks again about her education in Salem. She talks about cultural events, particularly those organized by Chautauquas; the lead-up to World War I; and the education of her siblings, as well as their families and careers. She discusses attending Willamette University, and describes the campus and student body. She then talks about her career as a high school teacher in North Bend, Oregon, and at North Salem High School. She talks about some of her students, including Cecil L. Edwards, Edith Green, and Mark Hatfield. She also discusses her own political beliefs.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on January 12, 1990, Eyre discusses her fan collection, and also describes some of her travels. She then talks about her 1963 run for the Oregon Legislature and her involvement in various organizations, including the teachers' union. She talks about school funding, mandatory retirement ages for teachers, and what she believes makes a good teacher. She closes the interview by discussing grading, year-round schooling, and her hopes for the future of Oregon.

Eyre, Mary E. (Mary Eleanor), 1897-1999

Oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman

  • SR 9042
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-17

This oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Eugene, Oregon, on September 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Freeman discusses her early life on a farm in Colton, Oregon; attending Oregon State University; and working as a math teacher in Oregon and California. She then talks about settling in Eugene after her marriage to Neil Freeman, and about teaching mathematics at the University of Oregon from 1943 to 1949. She discusses how her involvement in Lane County politics began with a Democratic speechwriting contest in which she took second place, losing to future U. S. Rep. Edith Green. She talks about serving as precinct committee chair, her involvement with the League of Women Voters, and running for the Oregon Legislature in 1952. She discusses her reasons for joining the Democratic Party and her campaign for Lane County treasurer. She speaks at length about her accomplishments as treasurer. Freeman talks about feeling as if the county commissioners didn't hold the office of treasurer in high esteem and how that pushed her to run for Lane County clerk in 1960. She discusses her accomplishments as county clerk, then describes how the office of county clerk was changed to an appointed position rather than elected, which led to her losing the position. She closes the interview by talking about her activities during retirement, including freelance writing.

Freeman, Olga Samuelson, 1903-1997