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Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 3972
  • Collection
  • 1999-02-10 - 2000-11-02

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Clark Hansen at Paulus's home in Salem, Oregon, in Lincoln City, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon; and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from February 10, 1999, to November 2, 2000, and from February 10 to 27, 2010. In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life in Burns, Oregon, including life during World War II and contracting polio at the age of 19. She also discusses working as a secretary for the Harney County district attorney, Leland Beckham; moving to Salem to work for a law firm; working for Judge Earl Latourette; and going to law school. Paulus describes meeting Bill Paulus while attending law school; his family background; and their marriage. Paulus discusses her involvement with the Republican Party; working as an appellate lawyer for the Oregon Supreme Court; working on Wally Carson's campaign for the Oregon Legislature in 1965; and getting her first political appointment, to the Marion County Boundary Commission, where she focused on land-use and city planning issues. She focuses on managing a career in law and politics while raising two young children and building a house.

She then discusses her time in the Oregon House of Representatives, from 1970 to 1976, including environmental issues such as the Bottle Bill of 1971 and recycling; education; the criminal code; taxes; attempts to make Cape Kiwanda a state park; and the Rajneeshees. Paulus goes into detail about the women's caucus and the bills they focused on for women's rights, as well as efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. She describes working with Bob Smith, Paul Hanneman, Betty Roberts, Stafford Hansell, Jack Anunsen, Wally Priestly, Dick Eymann, Lynn Newbry, Glenn Jackson, Jason Boe, and Gretchen Kafoury. She also talks about being co-chair for Clay Myers' 1974 race for Oregon governor.

Paulus goes on to speak about her time as Oregon's first woman secretary of state from 1977 to 1985, including her first campaign in 1976 against Blaine Whipple; her efforts to increase voter turnout; and conducting audits, particularly of the Forestry Department. She also discusses the secretary of state's role as state archivist and the conflict between the Oregon State Archives and the Oregon Historical Society over which records belong with which institution. She also discusses working with Governor Vic Atiyeh. Paulus discusses running for governor against Neil Goldschmidt in 1986 and the challenges her campaign faced. She discusses her position on the Northwest Power Planning Council from 1987 to 1990, including working with Ted Hallock and Bob Duncan. She also discusses her position as Oregon superintendent of public instruction from 1990 to 1999, including her efforts to fund K-12 education. Paulus also relates a story about sharing an airplane with Moshe Dayan.

Paulus, Norma

Interview with Thomas H. Mercer

  • SR 3974
  • Collection
  • 1976

This interview with Thomas Mercer was conducted circa 1976. In the interview, Mercer, who was running against Al Ullman, discusses his current campaign for a seat in the Oregon House of Representatives. He also discusses his heart issues and how they have affected his career; gun control; and health care. In addition to the interview, there is a recording of a question-and-answer session with Mercer and voters during his campaign. In the session, Mercer addresses questions regarding abortion and taxation.

Also on the audiocassettes with the Mercer interview is a speech delivered by an unidentified man circa 1977, regarding his experience in the Oregon Legislature, and a discussion held in Salem, Oregon, also circa 1977. The speakers in the discussion include Robert Marx, Anthony Meeker, Margaret Dereli, Mae Yih, Bill Rutherford, Wally Carson, Ken Jernstedt, Tony Van Vliet, and other unidentified legislators. Topics include municipal-, county-, and state-level taxation; revenue sharing; correctional institutions; SB 100 and land use planning; and energy conservation. It is unknown what, if any, relationship these recordings have to the Mercer interview.

Mercer, Thomas H.

Oral history interview with Gladys Sims McCoy

  • SR 9045
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-20 - 1981-06-22

This oral history interview was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from February 20 to June 22, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, McCoy discusses her early life on a farm during the Depression in Chattanooga, Tennessee, including the impact that segregation had on her childhood, her education, and her early jobs. She then discusses attending Talladega University in Alabama, including the experience of having an international faculty and thereby an integrated community in the heart of the segregated South. She also talks about studying sociology. She describes seeking employment in the field of social work and accepting a job in Portland, Oregon, as assistant teenage program director at the YWCA. She discusses differences in the ways the black population was treated in Portland compared to her experiences in the South. She describes meeting Bill McCoy and their subsequent marriage, giving up her career to stay at home, and later pursuing a career again after raising seven children over the course of 17 years. She talks about attending Portland State University as an older student and the difficulty of finding child care. She then describes her work with Project Head Start in Vancouver, Washington; teaching sociology and counseling students at Clark College; and teaching sociology at Pacific University in Forest Grove.

McCoy discusses her involvement in local politics. She talks about serving on the board of Portland Public Schools, including her campaign and programs to improve schools. She speaks at length about the board's efforts to implement middle schools, and the opposition the idea faced. She talks about her involvement with Bob Straub's successful 1975 campaign for Oregon governor and serving as an ombudsman for the governor, as well as some of the cases she investigated. She talks about her 1978 campaign for Multnomah County commissioner. She describes some of her work as commissioner, the types of complaints she received, and her support for city-county consolidation. She closes the interview by discussing her philosophy of life.

McCoy, Gladys Sims, 1928-1993

Ted Hallock audio recordings

  • SR 24523
  • Collection
  • 1966 - 1993

This collection of audio recordings consists predominantly of political advertising work created or managed by Ted Hallock for his public relations agency. Most of the materials are open-reel tapes and date from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s. All but two recordings in the collection are unprocessed.

The processed recordings consist of interviews conducted in 1968 and circa 1975. The 1968 interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman with staffers for U.S. Senator Wayne Morse's re-election campaign. Also on the reel tape with the staff interviews are variations of political ads, produced by Hallock's company, for the Morse campaign. The interview conducted circa 1975 was with Aaron Brown, who became the first black judge in Oregon in 1969 and later served as a judge on the Multnomah County District Court. The interview was conducted by an unidentified woman for Grassroot News Northwest.

Unprocessed recordings in the collection include political campaign materials for Oregon politicians such as Ted Kulongoski, Jim Weaver, Les AuCoin, Wayne Morse, Bob Straub, Mike Lindberg, Connie McCready, John Kitzhaber, and Bob Duncan. The recordings also include advertisements on political topics including sales taxes, ballot measures regarding zoo funding, and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. There are also business advertisements, including ads for Douglas Community Hospital, Bidwell & Co., and John's Landing.

Hallock, Ted

Oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand

  • SR 9043
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-01

This oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Milwaukie, Oregon, on September 1, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hand discusses her early life in Baker and Portland, Oregon, including her memories of the Depression and working at the Oregonian newspaper in Portland during high school. She then describes attending Reed College, meeting Floyd Hand and their subsequent marriage, and the difficulty Floyd had finding a job after graduating during the Depression. She discusses Floyd Hand's service in the Navy during World War II and her experience traveling with him during his training, as well as working in the Portland shipyards.

Hand discusses getting involved in politics through an attempt to save public transportation in the Portland area. She talks about her reaction to Adlai Stevenson's defeat in the 1952 presidential election. She describes becoming precinct committeewoman for the Democratic Party, and then vice-chairman, alongside Chairman Richard Groener. She describes their efforts to build the Democratic Party in Oregon. She then talks about working as a secretary for Groener after he was elected to the Oregon Legislature in 1956, and about being appointed to the House of Representatives in 1957. She describes the ways in which she and other women legislators were treated differently. She also talks about her committee assignments, particularly her work on the highway, parks, and ways and means committees. She describes some of the legislation that she worked on, particularly regarding highways and public utility districts. She speaks at length about her opposition to nuclear power. She then talks about her unsuccessful campaigns for the Oregon Senate and secretary of state. She closes the interview by talking about the prominent Democrats she worked with during her political career.

Hand, Beulah J. (Beulah Joan Caviness), 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Stafford Hansell

  • SR 88
  • Collection
  • 1983 October 17 - 1986 June

This oral history interview with Stafford Hansell was conducted by Barbara Reynolds from October 17 to November 15, 1983, and in June 1986. In the interview, Hansell discusses his family history and early life on a farm in Umatilla County, Oregon, including having diphtheria and polio as a child and the long-term effects on his health. He also talks about his education at the University of Montana and Whitman College, including his involvement in athletics and drama. Hansell talks about the early years of his marriage to Mary Elizabeth Ennis; making ends meet during the Depression; farming with his father; hog farming with his brother, Bill; and adopting his son, John. He also discusses serving on his local school board from 1953 to 1957, including implementing kindergarten and increasing school funding. Hansell then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and representing Umatilla County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation on land-use planning, taxation, labor, reapportionment, education, agriculture, and marijuana. He also discusses his failed bid to become Speaker of the House in the 1967 session, as well as many of the representatives he served with. Hansell also discusses his role on the Ways and Means Committee; the Boeing Space Age Park and Boardman; salary increases for legislators; and the Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall administrations. He speaks briefly on his feelings regarding the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. He also talks about working for the administrations of Governors Bob Straub and Norma Paulus after leaving the Legislature, including serving on the Oregon Liquor Commission, the State Board of Education, and the Governor's Taskforce on Land Use Planning. He also discusses the Rajneeshees. Hansell closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family, as well as his involvement with the Oregon Historical Society and his interest in Native American cultures and art.

Hansell, Stafford (Marion Stafford), 1913-1995

Oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre

  • SR 812
  • Collection
  • 1989-10-06 - 1990-01-12

This oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre was conducted by Vinita M. Howard at Eyre's home in Salem, Oregon, from October 6, 1989, to January 12, 1990. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 6, 1989, Eyre discusses her family background and early life in Buckley, Illinois. She talks about a family trip to Oregon in 1902 and tells a story about an escaped prisoner who was making headlines at the time. She discusses her first year of school in Illinois. She then talks about life in Salem, Oregon, including the family banking business, the family home, and their neighborhood. She also talks about her education in Salem.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 12, 1989, Eyre continues discussing the family home and neighborhood in Salem, and describes features that were common in houses in the early 20th century, particularly woodsheds. She talks about her education in Salem; describes the old Capitol building and businesses in downtown Salem; and talks about the family's first car. She also briefly talks about some of the floods that affected Marion County in the early 20th century. She talks about anti-Semitic attitudes, popular fashions, and attending church. She speaks again about her education in Salem. She talks about cultural events, particularly those organized by Chautauquas; the lead-up to World War I; and the education of her siblings, as well as their families and careers. She discusses attending Willamette University, and describes the campus and student body. She then talks about her career as a high school teacher in North Bend, Oregon, and at North Salem High School. She talks about some of her students, including Cecil L. Edwards, Edith Green, and Mark Hatfield. She also discusses her own political beliefs.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on January 12, 1990, Eyre discusses her fan collection, and also describes some of her travels. She then talks about her 1963 run for the Oregon Legislature and her involvement in various organizations, including the teachers' union. She talks about school funding, mandatory retirement ages for teachers, and what she believes makes a good teacher. She closes the interview by discussing grading, year-round schooling, and her hopes for the future of Oregon.

Eyre, Mary E. (Mary Eleanor), 1897-1999