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Oral history interview with Bob Christ

This oral history interview with Bob Christ was conducted by Jack G. Collins on September 28, 1990, with introductory comments by William F. White. White introduces the recording with the title "The Mover for the Shakers." In the interview, Christ briefly describes his early life in Portland, Oregon; his education; and his early career as a lawyer. He then discusses how he began his career as a law clerk at the U.S. District Court of Oregon in Portland, including his initial conversation with George Juba; assembling his staff; and the duties of the job. Christ talks about the procedures of the District Court and about judges he worked with, particularly Gus Solomon. He also talks about the transition to the digital age and other changes to the court. He closes the interview with an anecdote about finding what he thought was a bomb in the court bathroom, and the story of the impeachment of Judge Harry Claiborne of Nevada.

Christ, Bob (Robert Marvin), 1927-2019

Oral history interview with William V. Deatherage

This oral history interview with William V. Deatherage was conducted by Donald W. Brodie in Deatherage's office in Medford, Oregon, on February 24, 2003. In this interview, Deatherage discusses his service in the U.S. Navy from 1945 to 1948, particularly regarding the USS New Jersey. He then talks about his law professors at the University of Oregon. He discusses deciding to practice law with Otto Frohnmayer in Medford and gives a brief history of the law firm that was later known as Frohnmayer, Deatherage, Jamieson, Moore, Armosino and McGovern. He discusses some of the cases he tried over his career, including a first-degree murder case; judges he argued before; and his campaign for the Medford School Board. He also talks about his involvement in the Oregon State Bar and other legal organizations. He discusses the changes in the legal profession over the 20th century, including the increase in arbitration in lieu of trial. He also talks about government funding problems at the time of the interview and their effect on Medford. Deatherage and Brodie reminisce about the law school at the University of Oregon. Deatherage closes the interview by discussing his love of golf and gardening.

Deatherage, William V. (William Vernon), 1927-2018

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson

This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS. She also discusses her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns.

Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney's office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak's successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney's office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney's office, particularly Turner's emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.

Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison's biography, "Standing Tall." She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde

This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones' name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Fedde's wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present during the interview and often contributed to Canty-Jones' questioning. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.

In the interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hague, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty

This oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty was conducted by Clark Hansen in Haggerty's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, in four sessions from December 9, 2005, to February 23, 2006. Interview sessions in December 2005, part of a session in January 2006, and the session in February 2006 were recorded on audiocassette. The other part of the session in January 2006 was recorded on videocassette.

In the December 2005 and January 2006 sessions recorded on audiocassette, Haggerty discusses his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, including his involvement in high school football. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, his views on the Vietnam War, and joining the Marine Corps. He discusses his military training, being wounded in Vietnam in 1968, and his rehabilitation. He also discusses some of the politics contemporary to the interview session in 2005. He talks about attending the U.C. Hastings College of the Law and taking the Oregon bar exam in 1973.

Haggerty speaks about his legal career, beginning with a brief discussion of his work as a public defender for the Metropolitan Public Defender in Portland from 1973 to 1977. He then talks about working as a lawyer with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt from 1977 to 1989. He discusses his marriage to Judith Ann Blair in 1983, and their children. He talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1990 to 1993, including his appointment by Governor Neil Goldschmidt, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election campaign. He then talks about serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1993 to the time of the interview in 2006. He talks about his nomination by President Bill Clinton.

In the January 2006 video recording, Haggerty revisits the topic of his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, his interest in playing football, and his service in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. He then speaks in more detail about his college experience at U.C. Hastings College of the Law; his work as a public defender in Portland; and practicing law at Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt. He also talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and describes his experience as a judge on the Tom Metzger case, as well as other cases he heard. He then discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including his fellow judges, writing opinions, and serving as chief judge. He closes the video session by discussing his judicial philosophy.

In the final, audio-only interview session in February 2006, Haggerty discusses his early years as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, his relationship with his fellow District Court judges and other court employees, and the role of the court. He talks about some of the cases he heard, his staff, and serving as chief judge from 2002 until the time of the interview in 2006. He also discusses writing opinions, funding for the courts, and the make-up of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2006. He talks about the public opinion of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, jury trials, and sentencing. He talks about national politics between 2000 and 2006. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments.

Haggerty, Ancer Lee, 1944-

Oral history interview with John R. Dellenback

This oral history interview with John R. Dellenback was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dellenback's home in Medford, Oregon, from June 24 to October 3, 1992. In this interview, Dellenback discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois, including his family life, his early education, and some of his influential teachers. He speaks at length about his Christian faith and how it has influenced his personal philosophy. He talks about his experience at Yale University, including his social life. He talks about the jobs he worked after graduating, including working as a bellboy and at General Electric in Connecticut. He describes his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including the invasion of Okinawa. He discusses attending the University of Michigan Law School, as well as his courtship of Mary Jane Benedict and their subsequent marriage. He then talks about practicing law with Frank Van Dyke in Medford, Oregon, including his philosophy of law. He also talks about his involvement with several local organizations, including the Oregon Bar Association. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, as well as his views on contemporary geopolitics.

Dellenback discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1966. He talks about his reasons for running for the Legislature in 1960 and his campaign that year. He talks about his committee assignments, building coalitions, and the attempt to revise the state constitution in 1963. He also discusses other legislation that came up during his time in the House; Governor Mark Hatfield's administration; and engaging with his constituents. He also speaks at length about national Republican politics, including his longtime support for Nelson Rockefeller; President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal; and his moderate Republicanism. Dellenback then discusses serving in the U.S. House from 1967 to 1974. He talks about his decision to run for a seat in Congress, his campaigns, and his staff. He discusses legislation that came up in Congress during this time, his fellow representatives, and congressional procedure. He talks about the Vietnam War, the proliferation of nuclear weapons, and the Oregon Dunes. He also discusses his 1974 election loss.

Dellenback discusses serving as director of the Peace Corps from 1975 to 1977. He describes the mission and activities of the Peace Corps. He also talks about the 1992 presidential election. He talks about serving as president of the Christian College Coalition. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with other faith-based organizations.

Dellenback, John R., 1918-2002

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer

This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006. In this interview, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde, and some of the opinions he wrote. He closes the interview by discussing the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government; changes in the judiciary; and his advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview with Betty Roberts was conducted by Katherine Huff O'Neil at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon, from October 24 to November 16, 2005. In addition to the audio recording of the interview, the collection includes 50 digital photographs depicting Roberts' childhood, family, and later judicial career and activities. The collection also includes an index to the photographs.

In the interview, Roberts discusses her family background and early life in Texas, including her father's disability and the financial strain her family suffered during the Depression. She also talks about her early education, including playing on a girls football team. She talks about attending Texas Wesleyan College; meeting Bill Rice and their subsequent marriage; and moving to Southern Oregon in 1946. She describes raising a family, and returning to college late in life to pursue a teaching career. She then talks about getting involved in Democratic politics while attending Portland State University; the difficulty of balancing school, work, politics, and family; and her 1962 marriage to Frank Roberts. She also discusses some of the discrimination she faced due to her age and gender. She talks about studying law at Northwestern College of Law, including her professors and fellow students.

Roberts discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968. She talks about her experience as one of the few women in the Legislature, some of the legislation she worked on, and passing the Oregon bar in 1967. She talks about meeting Keith Skelton in the Legislature and their subsequent marriage in 1968. She then talks about serving in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977. She describes the lack of a women's restroom in the Senate and other forms of discrimination she faced. She speaks at length about some of the legislation she worked on, particularly bills focusing on abortion and allowing married women to choose their names. She talks about other women legislators and the formation of the women's caucus in 1973, as well as much of the legislation on women's rights they worked on. She also discusses her committee assignments, practicing law in Portland while serving in the Legislature, and the formation of the Oregon Court of Appeals in 1977.

Roberts discussing serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982. She discusses her appointment; her fellow judges, particularly Herb Schwab; and the sexism she faced. She then discusses serving as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1982 to 1986. She talks about her appointment, her fellow justices, and her experience as the first woman on the court. She also talks about some of the cases she heard and precedents set by her opinions. She then talks about her reasons for retiring in 1986, as well as her work as a mediator. Roberts and O'Neil close the interview by discussing the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers and some of that organization's activities.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with James A. Redden

This oral history interview with James A. Redden was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Redden's chambers at the U.S. District Court in Portland, Oregon, on January 27, 2006. In this interview, Redden discusses cases during his time as Oregon attorney general and as a U.S. District Court judge, including some involving treaties with Native Americans and fishing rights on the Columbia River, as well as the effects of the dams on salmon runs and other fisheries. He also discusses the history and impact of the U.S. District Court Historical Society; the war on terror, particularly the Patriot Act; and drug-related cases.

Redden, James A.

Oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan

This oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Sullivan's chambers at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Portland, Oregon, on July 6, 2006. In the interview, Sullivan discusses his early career as a lawyer in Salem, and as assistant district attorney with Sid Lezak in the Multnomah County district attorney's office in Portland, then as a clerk for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He describes working with judges Gus Solomon and William East. Sullivan also talks about serving as a bankruptcy judge. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family.

Sullivan, Donal D. (Donal Dennis), 1931-2009

Oral history interview with Owen Panner

This interview with Owen Panner was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Portland, Oregon, on December 19, 2005. In the interview, Panner discusses mandatory sentencing and the effect of politics on the judiciary. He also talks about his plan to move to the District Court in Medford, Oregon. In addition, he discusses the structure and procedures of the District Court; technology in the courts; his involvement with the U.S. District Court Historical Society; and life on his Medford ranch.

Panner, Owen Murphy, 1924-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin [Video 01]

Session 1. This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Lee Johnson

This oral history interview with Lee Johnson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Johnson's home, as well as his office, in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to September 29, 1992. In this interview, Johnson discusses his family background and early life in Toledo, Oregon, during the Depression; he likens Toledo to a company town. He talks about moving to Portland at the age of 11, then attending prep school in New Jersey, and Princeton after that. He discusses how his education at Princeton changed his political outlook, and talks about volunteering for the Navy after the Korean War. He then talks about studying law at Stanford, including his interest in antitrust law, his involvement with the Law Review, and starting a family with his wife, Dorothy Marie Miller. He goes on to discuss his brief stint as a trial lawyer for the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., under both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations, as well as practicing law in Portland. He briefly describes many of the judges before whom he argued cases. He talks about his involvement with the Trumpeters and the Republican Party.

Johnson discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, advocating for a sales tax, and his views on decriminalizing drugs. He also talks about some of the legislators he served with, including Monte Montgomery and Harry Boivin. He also speaks about Governor Mark Hatfield's administration; reapportionment; and the constitutionality of the Beach Bill. He then discusses serving as attorney general for Oregon from 1969 to 1975, particularly his campaigns. He also discusses some of the cases he prosecuted, his staff, and recruiting lawyers. He also speaks at length about the passage of the Bottle Bill. He discusses working in Governor Tom McCall's administration, as well as Governor Bob Straub's; his rivalry with Clay Myers; and working with George Van Hoomisen. He also talks about his work on cases regarding welfare reforms, particularly to help single mothers; antitrust law; regulation of fisheries; and crime prevention. He speaks often about the working relationship the district attorney's office had with the Oregon Legislature. He also describes his DUI arrest and the resulting trial; the gun control debate; the prison system and capital punishment; and whistleblower protections.

Johnson discusses his partial term as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1978, including his campaigns, the role of the judiciary, and working with juries. He also discusses judges he worked with, including Jacob Tanzer, Jason Lee, Hans Linde and Herb Schwabe. He talks about judicial decisions, including on abortion; procedures of the court; continuing education; the relationship between courts of different levels; and his views on the role of judges. He speaks at length about his time working for the administration of Governor Vic Atiyeh, as well as changes in the Legislature. He then talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court of Appeals from 1983 up to the time of the interview in 1992, including cases he worked on, his colleagues, and staff. He talks about how legislation has affected the job of judges, including the war on drugs, liability laws, and sentencing guidelines. He closes the interview with a discussion of the members of the Oregon delegation to Congress.

Johnson, Lee (Robertson Lee), 1930-2009

Oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer

This oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer was conducted by Craig J. Capon in Eugene, Oregon, from February 27 to June 20, 2008. In this interview, Spencer discusses his children and grandchildren, as well as his family background and early life in Eugene. He talks about going to the Lane County courthouse to watch trials for fun during high school. He then talks about attending Harvard University for several years before his naval reserve unit was activated in 1944. He describes his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including an experience when his ship was hit by a kamikaze. He talks about returning to finish his degree and study law at Harvard in 1946, and describes some of his classes and his social life. He then talks about returning to Eugene to prepare for the Oregon bar exam, meeting Amy Lou Ware, and their subsequent marriage.

Spencer discusses working as an assistant Lane County district attorney from 1949 to 1951. He talks about some of the cases he prosecuted, some of the judges he argued before, and lawyers he worked with. He then talks about practicing law in Cottage Grove for six months. He discusses teaching at the University of Oregon as an adjunct professor, then joining the Eugene law firm Bailey & Hoffman in 1953. He describes his daily life as a law associate, as well as his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes events in the Lane County bar and Circuit Court that led up to his appointment to the court in 1967, particularly regarding Judge Frank Reid. He discusses serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court from 1967 to 1989. He describes his daily activities as a judge and his staff. He also talks about changes in the court over the years, particularly societal changes and how they affected the judicial system. He describes some of the more complicated cases he heard, particularly those involving the death penalty. He discusses his reasons for retiring in 1989, as well as his retirement activities. He closes the interview by talking about the differences between the state and federal judiciary.

Spencer, Douglas R., 1923-2013

Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II. He discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health, as well as his high school experience in Eugene. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life, his summer activities, and his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon law school, including the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker. He speaks at length about the practice of law, as well as some of the cases he tried, some of his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

Peterson discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about his appointment by Governor Vic Atiyeh. He describes his fellow judges on the Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also shows Dobbins his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University law school and working as a mediator.

Peterson, Edwin J. (Edwin Junior), 1930-

Oral history interview with Charles O. Porter

This oral history interview with Charles O. Porter was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Porter's office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 18 to November 7, 1986. In this interview, Porter discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his education at Eugene High School, working for newspapers in the area, and his early political ambitions. He then talks about attending Harvard. He speaks at length about his experiences in Panama, and later in Europe, during World War II. He then talks about returning to Harvard, job prospects, and returning to Oregon to take a job on the state Highway Commission. He discusses practicing law in Eugene, including his experience with various judges, some of the cases he worked on, and the administration of justice. He then talks about getting involved in politics, including being offered the position of assistant to the U.S. attorney general by Monroe Sweetland. He turned down the offer and ran for Congress instead.

Porter discusses representing the Fourth District of Oregon in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1956 to 1960, particularly his campaigns. He talks about his fellow legislators, including Wayne Morse, Maurine Neuberger, Edith Green, and Joseph McCarthy. He discusses parliamentary procedure and legislation he worked on, particularly on foreign policy in Latin America. He also talks about his relationship with the press; his involvement with Amnesty International; and his activities as a lawyer after his 1960 re-election loss. He discusses many of the cases he worked on, including on prisoners' rights, fluoridation, sterilization, and a case against the Air Force. He closes the interview by talking about his family and the livability of Oregon.

Porter, Charles O. (Charles Orlando), 1919-2006

Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview of Betty Roberts was conducted by Clark Hansen from March 24, 1992, to September 19, 1994, at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Roberts describes her early life and family background, including growing up in Texas during the Depression and her father's alcohol poisoning. She also discusses meeting her first husband, John Willard "Bill" Rice, as well as their marriage and starting a family in Oregon. Roberts discusses attending Portland State College and the strain it put on her marriage to Rice; discrimination she encountered as an older woman student; and pursuing a master's degree at the University of Oregon. She also talks about her divorce from Rice due to his objection to her working outside the home, the divorce's effect on her children, and her subsequent marriage to Frank L. Roberts. She also discusses her divorce from Frank Roberts in 1965.

Roberts discusses her career as an educator, including teaching at high schools in East Portland; serving on school boards; and her activity in the Oregon Education Association. She talks about meeting her third husband, Keith Skelton; civil liberties; her involvement in the Democratic Party; and practicing law. She then talks about her experiences in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, sexist media coverage, and teaching high school and attending law school at Northwestern College of Law while in the Legislature. Roberts discusses legislation she worked on during her time in the House, primarily on education, including sick leave for teachers and universal kindergarten.

Roberts also discusses her 1968 campaign for the Oregon Senate against Tom Mahoney, as well as the 1968 presidential campaign, including the debate around the Vietnam War and her attendance at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. She then discusses her experience in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977, including legislation on taxes, particularly sales taxes; women's rights; abortion; environmental issues; rape shield laws; and child custody. She discusses working with Debbs Potts, John D. Burns, and Gracie Peck, and and talks about running for governor against Bob Straub in 1974. She also discusses her run for the U.S. Senate against Bob Packwood the same year. She talks about the various forms of sexism she encountered while in the Senate, the formation of the Women's Caucus in 1973, and support for the Equal Rights Amendment.

Roberts talks about her time as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982, and about working alongside judges Herbert Schwabe and W. Michael Gillette. She describes being appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court by Governor Vic Atiyeh and the encouragement she received from Norma Paulus. She discusses several cases from the years 1982 to 1986, including cases regarding sex discrimination and misuse of taxpayer monies. She also talks about her law clerk, Maureen Leonard, and about working alongside judges Jacob Tanzer and Mercedes Deiz. Roberts relates her opinion on the efficacy and procedures of the judicial system in Oregon. She discusses her activities after resigning from the court, including her involvement with Oregon Women Lawyers and the Bob Packwood sexual harassment scandal.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley

This oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dooley's home in Wilsonville, Oregon, from September 23 to October 26, 1992. Barbara Lynch Dooley was also present for the session conducted on October 26, 1992.

In this interview, Dooley discusses his family background and early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his early education at Catholic schools and his experience during the Depression. He talks about moving to Washington for his sister's education and about working various jobs. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Army in North Africa and Italy during World War II. He also talks about his marriage to Barbara Lynch in 1942. He discusses his determination to go to law school after his discharge in 1945; attending Reed College while working full time; studying law at Northwestern College of Law; and taking the Oregon bar exam. He talks about practicing law in Portland with Leo Smith, including some of the judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled.

Dooley discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1953 to 1958. He describes his campaigns, his committee assignments, and legislation he worked on, particularly regarding taxes. He talks about Governor Paul Patterson's administration, as well as some of Dooley's fellow legislators. He also discusses partisanship in the Legislature and his role in the formation of party caucuses. He talks about his experience as speaker of the House from 1957 to 1958, including serving as acting governor, making committee assignments, and working with Governor Bob Holmes.

Dooley discusses serving as a Multnomah County Circuit Court judge from 1968 to 1983. He talks about court procedure, cases he heard, and his feelings about handing down sentences. He spends some time looking at a scrapbook and talking about the photographs and articles in it. He talks about judges and lawyers he worked with and admired; changes in the legal profession; and his philosophy of law. He closes the interview by reflecting on Oregon political history and his own accomplishments.

Dooley, Patrick Eugene, 1918-1999

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Bernard Jolles

This oral history interview with Bernard Jolles was conducted by Robert D. Bulkley, Jr. at Jolles' office in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1990, to April 22, 1991. In this interview, Jolles discusses his family background and early life in New York, including his Jewish upbringing and facing antisemitism; his education; and the Depression. He describes attending New York University and his growing interest in Marxism. He then discusses working in the New York Garment District and at the waterfront after graduation, and talks about his involvement with various unions. He describes being a communist during the height of the McCarthy era, as well as his reasons for leaving the Communist Party in 1956. Jolles discusses relocating to Oregon in 1957 and attending the Northwestern College of Law in Portland. He talks about working as an investigator for a personal injury lawyer after graduation and the trouble he had passing the bar exam due to his communist ties. He discusses his appeal to the Oregon Supreme Court of the Bar's decision to reject him.

Jolles discusses his career as a trial lawyer in Portland, including arguing cases before the federal and state courts, working with other lawyers, and some of the cases he tried. He briefly describes Judge Gus Solomon and other judges he argued before. He also discusses the types of cases he took, particularly those representing workers and labor unions. He talks about his own law firm, Jolles, Sokol, & Bernstein, formed in 1979; the changes in the profession over the decades; and his involvement with the A.C.L.U. and the Christic Institute. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, including serving on the board of governors and as president.

Jolles, Bernard, 1928-

Oral history interview with Cleveland C. Cory

The first part of this oral history interview with Cleveland Cory was conducted by George Fraser at Cory's home on the Willamette River on June 19, 1990. In this interview, Cory discusses his family background and early life in Englewood, New Jersey. He then discusses his college experience, including attending Yale Law School from 1940 to 1943. He then talks about working for the Davis & Polk law firm in New York, including representing Prince Edward, the Duke of Windsor, as well as various railroads. He then discusses relocating to Oregon in 1949 and his reasons for doing so, including seeking an improved quality of life and the difficulty of becoming a partner at a New York law firm. He talks about his career at a law firm in Portland, now known as Stoel Rives, including many of the cases he tried. He also briefly discusses his renowned memory for cases.

The second part of the interview was recorded at the Crestview Convalescent Home in Portland, Oregon, where Cory was recovering from a broken shoulder. No date is given. The sound quality is very poor. Cory and Fraser further discuss Cory's early employment in Portland.

Cory, Cleveland C. (Cleveland Cady), 1918-1991

Oral history interview with Robert C. Belloni

This oral history interview with Robert C. Belloni was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from September 19, 1988, to July 28, 1989. In this interview, Belloni discusses his family background and early life in Coos County, Oregon, including his education. He talks about studying pre-med at the University of Oregon and his service as a U.S. Army medical officer in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He describes landing in Japan just as it surrendered. He talks about returning to civilian life and deciding to go to law school, attending the University of Oregon, and his friendship with Ted Goodwin. He discusses his early law career in Coos County. He also talks about his early political career, holding the offices of chair of the Democratic Central Committee for Coos County and mayor of Myrtle Point. He also talks about his relationship with Wayne Morse. He discusses serving as a Circuit Court judge in Southern Oregon from 1957 to 1967, particularly presiding over juvenile cases. He then discusses serving on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1967 to the time of the interview, including the politics of his appointment. He discusses his fellow District Court judges, including Gus Solomon, John Kilkenney, and Otto Skopil. He also talks about the variety of cases that came before him, including on land fraud, asbestos, consumer protections, and several cases involving Native American rights. He discusses his law clerks, judicial process, and ethics. Belloni discusses serving as chief judge on the District Court from 1971 to 1976, and the duties and responsibilities of that position, including his work in establishing the magistrate system and the sentencing council. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the court systems over the 20th century, his experience as a senior judge, and his personal life.

In addition to the audio recordings of the interview, this collection includes several photographs of Belloni and a signed photograph of Robert D. Holmes.

Belloni, Robert C. (Robert Clinton), 1919-1999

Oral history interview with Hugh Biggs

This oral history interview with Hugh Biggs was conducted by Clarence Wicks in the offices of Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey in Portland, Oregon, from June 29 to July 2, 1988. In this interview, Biggs discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon, including the law career of his father, Dalton Biggs, as well as his father's service as a Circuit Court judge from 1910 to 1928. He discusses his own education, and life on a farm. He then talks about attending the University of Oregon, including studying law, social life, and serving as dean of men. He also talks about his wife, Elra Ware, and their children. He then briefly discusses practicing law in Ontario, serving as district attorney for Malheur County, and working as an assistant U.S. attorney in Portland, Oregon. He talks about going into private practice in Portland, particularly at Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey, including the cases he worked on, clients he represented, and the history of the firm. He briefly describes the judges of the U.S. District Court of Oregon and his experiences arguing before them. He also talks about the various professional organizations he was involved in.

Biggs, Hugh L. (Hugh Lawry), 1904-1996

Oral history interview with John P. Bledsoe

This oral history interview with John P. Bledsoe was conducted by Donna Delo at Bledsoe's office in Portland, Oregon, from January 13 to March 10, 1989. In this interview, Bledsoe discusses his family background and early life in Pocahontas, Arkansas, including a description of a childhood game he played called "Jumper Down"; the law and judicial career of his father, John Louis Bledsoe; and his early education and social life. He also talks about his experience during the Depression. He then discusses his college life at the University of Arkansas and at Harvard Law School. He also discusses his Navy service during World War II, which interrupted his law studies. He also briefly talks about his wife, Helen Wieman, and their five children. He then describes his law career in Portland, at the offices of Spears, Lubersky, Campbell & Bledsoe. He discusses his clients and cases he tried, including corporate cases involving the Oregon Journal and the Pacific Gas Transmission Company. He also talks about a trip he took to Iran with a client in the 1970s. He briefly describes each of the lawyers he worked with at his firm, as well as some of the judges he argued before. He also talks about his hobbies and involvement with social organizations, including the Arlington Club. He closes the interview by talking about the changes he's seen in society over the 20th century, his heroes, and advice for aspiring lawyers.

Bledsoe, John P. (John Perry), 1921-2011

Oral history interview with Rupert R. Bullivant

This oral history interview with Rupert R. Bullivant was conducted by C. Allan Hart from July 20 to September 7, 1988. In this interview, Bullivant discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his college experience at the University of Oregon, including his involvement with the school paper, the Oregon Daily Emerald. He then talks about his marriage to Norma Jean Wilson and his return to Portland, where he practiced law. He talks about judges he argued before, particularly Judge James Alger Fee, cases he tried, and lawyers he worked with. He describes the history the law firm he started in 1938. He also briefly talks about teaching at the Northwestern College of Law in Portland; serving on the board of governors of the Oregon State Bar, and as its president; serving on the Portland Planning Commission; and serving as a commissioner on the National Conference on Uniform Laws. He discusses representing insurance companies, public transportation companies, and dairy companies. He also speaks about his personal life and activities. He closes the interview by revisiting some of the discussion from the first tape, about his family background.

Bullivant, Rupert R. (Rupert Reid), 1903-1992

Oral history interview with William G. East

This oral history interview with William G. East was conducted by Rick Harmon in East's chambers in Eugene, Oregon, from November 8 to 15, 1984. In this interview, East discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his education and interest in journalism and sports. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon from 1927 to 1932 and studying law. He talks about the Depression hitting in the middle of his studies, his social life, and his developing political outlook. He also talks about Orlando Hollis and Wayne Morse as law professors. He then discusses practicing law in Eugene from 1932 to 1942, including law firms he worked at and cases he tried. He describes his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, including his training, service in Germany, and his involvement in the capture of Hermann Göring. He describes his return to civilian life and law practice, as well as his position as city attorney for Eugene. He talks about his service on the Oregon Circuit Court from 1949 to 1955, including his appointment, conflict with the press, and various cases he heard. East goes on to discuss his service on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1955 to 1967, including his appointment. He particularly focuses on a scandal that nearly derailed his appointment and on a meeting with President Eisenhower. He also discusses cases he heard, including a negligence case involving Booth-Kelly Lumber Company that he heard twice, and a case on public defender compensation. He describes the changes to court procedures implemented by Judge Gus Solomon. He then discusses his decision to take senior judge status in 1967, as well as his activities since then, including cases on Native American rights and sovereignty. He closes the interview with a discussion of his judicial philosophy, his involvement with various civic organizations, and his hobbies and family life.

East, William G., 1908-1985

Oral history interview with Alice Tomkins Fee

This oral history interview with Alice Tomkins Fee was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, from February 8 to March 8, 1985. In this interview, Fee discusses her family background and early life in Portland and Cascade Locks, Oregon, including her education, her memories of World War I, and the lack of career options available to women. She discusses attending the Oregon Normal School in Monmouth, including her teachers and social life, and studying music at the University of Oregon. She then talks about her career as a teacher and principal at schools in Malin, Pine Grove, and Hood River, Oregon. She also discusses the numerous health issues she's had over the years. She speaks about working as a typist in the clerk's office for the U.S. District Court of Oregon, then as a stenographer for naturalization and bankruptcy cases, and then as a law clerk. She discusses the judges she worked with, the Pioneer Courthouse, and the procedures of the court. She speaks at length about her husband, Judge James Alger Fee, including his family background, early life, and judicial career, as well as cases he presided over and her work as his secretary. She discusses the circumstances surrounding Judge Fee's heart attack in 1959 and his funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. She closes the interview by talking about her activities since her husband's death, including traveling, cooking and reading.

Fee, Alice Tomkins (Alice Emma Tomkins), 1897-1995

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