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Oral history interview with Ellen Goldberg, by Annica Eagle and Spencer Trueax

Ellen Goldberg is a lesbian activist who was one of the co-founders of the Mountain Moving Café, a collectively run restaurant that was created to engender networking, collaboration, and particularly political organizing. The café, with its large dance floor and performance stage, featured different entertainment every night of the month and was well-known for it's Wednesday Women's Nights (on these evenings, men were turned away). An earlier interview with Goldberg, addressing the café and radical political organizing, was conducted in 1978 (SR6314).

Goldberg, Ellen

Oral history interview with Sally Cohn, by Jade Davis and Erin Babcock Musick

Sally Cohn is a lesbian activist who has been involved with many organizations in Portland, Oregon since the 1970s. She discusses several topics including her involvement with the Lesbian Community Project, Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, lesbian stereotypes, women’s softball, and what it was like to fight anti-gay ballot measures. She also talks about her appearance on national television doing her “hand whistling.”

Cohn, Sally H.

Oral history interview with Cindy Cumfer, by Erik Funkhouser and Tim Aguirre

Cindy Cumfer discusses her involvement with the lesbian and women's communities in Portland, Oregon; her work as a civil rights attorney, particularly in the area of lesbian adoption; the AIDS epidemic and how it bridge the divide between the gay and lesbian communities; and her involvement with the Unitarian Universalist Church.

Cumfer, Cynthia

Oral history interview with Kimberlee Van Patten, by Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood

Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood, PSU students, interviewed Kimberlee Van Patten on February 12th 2009. Kimberlee Van Patten has been involved with the Imperial Sovereign Rose Court and Peacock in the Park for several years. During the interview we discussed her life in general, from her childhood to the present, as well as her involvement with both the Court and Peacock in the Park. Kimberlee told us a little about Lady Elaine Peacock and the Audria M. Edwards Scholarship Fund and also about many of the members of the Rose Court. We discussed other new projects she is working on and her favorite memories and some sad moments from the projects that she has worked on in the past.

Van Patten, Kimberlee

Oral history interview with Charles Hinkle, by Michael Lamore and Michelle Brown

This is the first interview with Charles Hinkle. The second interview will be during Spring term 2009.
This interview was taken for the Gay and Lesbian Pacific Northwest Archive and conducted by, Michael Lamore and Michelle Brown, who are Portland State University students working with the LGBTQ capstone class. They interviewed Charles F. Hinkle who has been an ACLU lawyer in Portland for over 30 years. Hinkle was involved in the Black civil rights movement in the 60’s while working on his degree and took Oregon’s first gay rights case of a teacher being fired for her sexual orientation, Peggy Burton, in 1972. Hinkle has been involved in gay civil rights cases ever since. He has been known as a strong ally and advocate to the gay community for many years. His involvement in gay rights in Oregon has a large legacy, but due to time constraints this interview covered his involvement from 1972-1988.

Hinkle, Charles F.

Oral history interview with George Oberg, by Brian Aune and Heather Burmeister

George Oberg lives in Vancouver, Washington. He was the first president of the Second Foundation, which was a gay rights organization during the 1970s. During the interview, he talks about the early gay rights movement as well as the AIDS crisis of the 1980s. He talks about how his partner died of AIDS.

Oberg, George

Oral history interview with Renee LaChance, by Brontë Olson and Nicole Estey

This is interview of Renee LaChance was conducted by Brontё Olson and Nicole Estey for the Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest as part of their senior capstone at Portland State University. LaChance worked with the queer newspaper The Cascade Voice, first selling advertising and writing and later as the editor for a period of time before founding Just Out newspaper with Jay Brown in 1983. The interview covers her involvement in the Gay Pride Festival, AIDS and ACT-UP, and Ballot Measures 9 and 13, as well as her experiences with running Just Out, her decision to sell, and her feelings about the path of the paper after its purchase by Marty Davis in 1998. It finishes with words of wisdom offered by LaChance for both the gay community and the general public on life and changing the future.

LaChance, Renee

Oral history interview with Patty Wolff, by David McCormack and Carla Moller

Patty Wolff relates stories and anecdotes about the life of Wolff's partner of many years, Maxine L'Ecuyer, and about the lives of lesbians during the first half of the 20th century. Wolff's partner, Maxine L'Ecuyer (b. 1923), was a French-Canadian, left by her parents to be raised in a Catholic orphanage in Kansas. After moving to California on her own at age 14, L'Ecuyer worked as a movie projectionist for the Marines during WWII, after which she joined a Catholic convent, believing her sexuality to be an abomination. Denied the right to take her final vows, L'Ecuyer attended graduate school at the University of Washington, and was briefly institutionalized (as a result of her sexuality being revealed and compromising her professional career as a professor). L'Ecuyer retired to Portland in her late 50s, at which time she at last found a means of realizing her same-sex attractions to other women. L'Ecuyer met Patty Wolff circa 1992, at a rally on Pioneer Square in opposition of Ballot Measure 9.

Wolff, Patty

Oral history interview with Charles F. Hinkle, by Nichant Mehra, Nathan Guynn and Michael Pratt

This interview is the 2nd of two separate interviews conducted in 2009. Hinkle focuses on the No On 9 campaign and his efforts in defeating Ballot Measure 9. Also discussed is the Oregon Citizens Alliance and its leaders, Lon Mabon and Scott Lively (whom Hinkle debated in a well-known Town Council broadcast.)

Hinkle, Charles F.

Oral history interview with Reverend Susan Leo, by Jae Ann Atwood and Genevieve Blaettler

Leo speaks of her experiences as an out lesbian pastor in the United Church of Christ; her experiences in Nicaragua during the 1980s that led to her decision to attend a Presbyterian seminary; homophobia within the church; and social justice & activism. She also addresses the difficulty her mother had in accepting Leo's lesbianism.

Leo, Susan, 1951-

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