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Six men aboard ship with “Portland Rose” painted on pilot house

Photograph showing a group of six unidentified men, three in military uniforms, atop the pilot house of a ship. An illustration of a rose and the words “Portland Rose” are painted on the front of the pilot house. The ship may be a U. S. Navy landing craft, LCS(L)66, built by the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland. The number 48 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the image. Information based on the following unverified note written on the negative sleeve: “Albina shipbuilding.”

Wreckage of steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of part of the steamship Laurel after it wrecked on a sandbar near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the steamer, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929, under the headline "All Hands Off But the Skipper -- And He's Still There." That photograph had the following caption: "In this remarkable air view of the wrecked hulk of the steamship Laurel lying in the breakers off North jetty beach the figure of Captain Louis Johnson shows near the rail as he waved goodbye to The Journal plane which circled over him Monday afternoon. The plane, piloted by Dick Rankin of the Rankin System, Inc., carried Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who took the picture, and Dick Rummel of The Journal staff." The photograph accompanied two articles about the Laurel shipwreck, one titled "Gale Balks Effort to Rescue Skipper; Seas Pound Laurel," and another titled "Journal Men Get Air View." Image note: The text "S. S. Laurel" is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Vincent, Ralph

Wreckage steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of the wreckage of the steamship Laurel after it struck Peacock Spit near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the ship, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published with several others on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929. The photographs appeared under the headline "Exclusive Photographs of Wrecked Steamer Laurel and Her Crew." Image note: The text “S. S. Laurel” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph.

Vincent, Ralph

Wreckage of British steamer Welsh Prince

Photograph of the wrecked steamship Welsh Prince in the Columbia River off Altoona, Washington. Seven men were killed when the Welsh Prince and the steamer Iowan collided in the Columbia near Altoona on May 28, 1922. Image note: Blurred writing visible on left edge of negative.

Kendo demonstration on Taisei Maru?

Photograph of two unidentified people performing a martial art on the deck of a ship. The photograph may depict a demonstration of kendo aboard the Taisei Maru, a training ship from Japan, when the ship and crew were in Portland from July 26-August 3, 1930. See related image No. 372N0664.

Sailing ship, possibly run aground

Photograph of an unidentified sailing ship, possibly run aground. Two people are dangling from a rope strung from the bow of the ship to somewhere outside the frame. The ship may be named Oregon. Also see image Nos. 371N5212, 371N5213, and 371N5214. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

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