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Crowds touring USS Houston in Portland after President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s arrival

Photograph of crowds aboard the U. S. S. Houston and waiting in line to board the ship on August 4, 1934. President Franklin D. Roosevelt arrived in Portland aboard the Houston on August 3, 1934, after a vacation cruise. He then traveled to the Bonneville dam construction site, where he gave a speech about the dam project. This photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 5, 1934, under the headline “Thousands Swarm Aboard President’s Vacation Ship.” The photograph had the following caption: “Photo shows line of visitors going aboard the cruiser Houston at the foot of Southwest Stark street Saturday afternoon. Officers of the vessel estimated that 9000 boarded the ship Friday afternoon and 11,000 Saturday, making 20,000 for two days. More thousands merely looked at the vessel from the harbor wall. The craft leaves the city Tuesday morning.” The photograph accompanied a story about the crowds that toured the ship. Also see the following related images from the president’s visit: Nos. 371N2168, 371N2169, 371N2170, 371N2171, 371N2172, 371N2173, 371N2174, 371N2190, 371N2192, 371N2193, 371N2194, 371N2195, 371N2197, and 371N3698.

Wreckage of steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of part of the steamship Laurel after it wrecked on a sandbar near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the steamer, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929, under the headline "All Hands Off But the Skipper -- And He's Still There." That photograph had the following caption: "In this remarkable air view of the wrecked hulk of the steamship Laurel lying in the breakers off North jetty beach the figure of Captain Louis Johnson shows near the rail as he waved goodbye to The Journal plane which circled over him Monday afternoon. The plane, piloted by Dick Rankin of the Rankin System, Inc., carried Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who took the picture, and Dick Rummel of The Journal staff." The photograph accompanied two articles about the Laurel shipwreck, one titled "Gale Balks Effort to Rescue Skipper; Seas Pound Laurel," and another titled "Journal Men Get Air View." Image note: The text "S. S. Laurel" is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Wreckage steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of the wreckage of the steamship Laurel after it struck Peacock Spit near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the ship, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published with several others on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929. The photographs appeared under the headline "Exclusive Photographs of Wrecked Steamer Laurel and Her Crew." Image note: The text “S. S. Laurel” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Wreckage of British steamer Welsh Prince

Photograph of the wrecked steamship Welsh Prince in the Columbia River off Altoona, Washington. Seven men were killed when the Welsh Prince and the steamer Iowan collided in the Columbia near Altoona on May 28, 1922. Image note: Blurred writing visible on left edge of negative.

Workers handling cargo on pier

Photograph showing unidentified workers handling cargo on a pier. At left, a crane is hoisting unidentified boxes onto a moored ship, the Wisconsin. At right, a worker is holding the handles of a wheelbarrow loaded with a large box wrapped in paper.

Lumber being loaded onto ship

Photograph, taken from the edge of a pier, showing stacked lumber in midair as it is hoisted onto a moored ship at left. Unidentified workers are standing on stacks of lumber already placed on the deck of the ship. The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the photograph. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Cargo being loaded onto ship

Photograph showing a pallet of paper-wrapped cylinders in midair as it is loaded or unloaded onto the deck of a ship. At center, an unidentified man is standing on the deck next to the opening of the ship’s cargo hold. See related image No. 371N3504.

Filled sacks being hoisted onto ship

Photograph showing a pallet stacked with sacks of sugar being hoisted from a pier at right onto the deck of a ship at left. Below the pallet, a worker is standing on the pier next to more sacks of sugar piled on a cart. Image note: Negative damage at center.

Crates of Duckwall fruit being loaded onto ship

Photograph showing a pallet stacked with crates being hoisted from a pier at right onto a ship moored at left. An unidentified worker is standing next to a cart below the pallet, watching the loading process. At right is a second cart also stacked with crates. The crates bear the labels of the Duckwall fruit-packing company in Hood River, Oregon. Also see related image No. 371N3503.

Cargo being hoisted onto ship

Photograph showing two unidentified workers standing next to carts on a pier as a pallet stacked with crates is hoisted from the pier onto a moored ship at right. Between the workers are two empty carts. Behind them is a third cart stacked with crates. Image note: Negative damage at center.

Crate being hoisted onto ship

Photograph showing a crate being hoisted from a pier at right onto a moored ship at left. A group of unidentified workers is standing on the pier. In the background, people are watching the loading process from the ship. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration at top due to deterioration of the negative.

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