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Multnomah County (Or.) glass plate negatives
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Warford

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and looking to the right. He is smiling and is wearing a hat, a suit jacket and vest, a collared shirt, and a tie. He may be standing outside Portland City Hall. The name “Warford, Mr” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 373G0213.

Captain J. Yawata of ocean liner Anyo Maru

Head and shoulders portrait of Captain J. Yawata of the ocean liner Anyo Maru. He is facing to the right and is wearing a visor cap and overcoat. The photograph was probably taken on January 17, 1921, when the Anyo Maru was in Portland. The text “Anyo Maru and Capt. J. Yawata” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 376G0118 and 376G0119.

Ida Tarbell during visit to Portland

Full-length portrait of Ida Tarbell sitting in a chair, facing front, and looking toward the left. The photograph was taken while Tarbell was in Portland as part of a lecture tour in February 1917. A cropped version of this photograph and a story about Tarbell’s visit were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, February 24, 1917, under the headline “Ida Tarbell Portland’s Guest / Big Luncheon Is Tendered Her / Talks on War, Peace, Industry.” The photograph had the following caption: “Ida M. Tarbell, noted economist and writer, who was recipient today of greatest luncheon ever tendered a woman in Oregon. This photograph was taken in Portland this morning.” The name “Mrs Ida Tarbal [sic]” and the number 162 are written on the negative and are visible in the upper right corner of the image.

Dr. Mack, Milk Department, City Hall

Half-length portrait of a man sitting at a desk in an office. He is looking downward and is holding a pen over a book on the desk in front of him. He is wearing glasses, a suit jacket and vest, a collared shirt, and a tie. The name “Mack, Dr.” and the text “Milk Dept, City Hall” are written on the negative sleeve. The man is probably Dr. D. W. Mack, a veterinarian and milk inspector for the city of Portland.

Dan Flood, Lyric Theatre

Full-length portrait of a man standing outdoors next to a sign for the Lyric Theatre in Portland. He is facing to the right and is wearing a hat, glasses, an overcoat, a collared shirt, and a tie. The sign reads: “The Lyric / Matinee 2:30 / Pictures 2:00 P.M.” The text “Flood, Dan / Lyric Theater [sic]” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 376G0277.

Dan Flood, Lyric Theatre

Full-length portrait of a man standing outdoors next to a sign for the Lyric Theatre in Portland. He is facing to the right and is wearing a hat, glasses, an overcoat, a collared shirt, and a tie. The sign reads: “The Lyric / Matinee 2:30 / Pictures 2:00 P.M.” The text “Flood, Dan / Lyric Theater [sic]” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 376G0276.

Interior of Apostolic Faith tabernacle, southeast Portland

Photograph showing the interior of the Apostolic Faith tabernacle in Woodstock, Portland, on what is now Southeast Duke Street at Southeast 52nd Avenue. The tabernacle has a domed ceiling. Rows of benches surround a tiered platform at the front of the tabernacle. On the wall above the platform are the words “BE YE RECONCILED TO GOD.”

Bishop J. P. McClosky with group in Portland

Full-length portrait of Bishop J. P. McClosky with a group of unidentified men, most of them clergy. McClosky (left) and another clergyman are sitting in chairs, and the others are standing in a row behind them. The photograph was taken in Portland on Saturday, July 21, 1917, when McClosky stopped in Portland on his way to the Philippines to assume a post as bishop. The Oregon Journal published a story and image No. 376G0211 of McClosky on Page 9 that day. According to the story, McClosky was accompanied by his secretary and a party of prominent clergy from Buffalo, New York, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who were traveling with him as far as San Francisco. The story reported that McClosky and his party were the guests of local Catholic clergy and the Knights of Columbus. Image note: The text “McClosky, Rt. Rev. and bishops” is written on the negative sleeve. Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

First Presbyterian Church, Portland, with steeple damaged by lightning

Photograph showing First Presbyterian Church at 11th and Alder streets (now Southwest 11th Avenue and Southwest Alder Street) in Portland on Saturday, July 17, 1920, after lightning damaged the steeple. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal’s July 17 city edition under the headline “Bolt Strikes.” The photograph had the following caption: “Steeple of First Presbyterian church, Eleventh and Alder streets, showing where lightning ripped slate off the roof in a jagged streak. Below, the street is roped off to prevent injury to pedestrians.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Steeple Is Shattered by Electric Bolt” and the subheading “Patrolman C. C. Martin, Seeking Shelter From Storm, Knocked Senseless When Shock Hits Edifice; Rain Puts Out Fire.” See related image No. 376G0316.

Broadway Bridge, Portland, with bascule raised during construction

Photograph showing the Broadway Bridge in Portland with one bascule raised in March 1913, while the bridge was under construction. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 17 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, Mary 6, 1913, under the headline “Move 2000 Tons Easily In Bridge Test.” The photograph had the following caption: “West leaf of the Broadway bridge bascule in place.” The story reported that the leaf had worked almost perfectly in tests, that the east leaf would be tested within a week, and the bridge was expected to be completed April 1. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Three-masted ship on Willamette River, Portland

Photograph, taken from the side, showing a three-masted ship moored on the Willamette River in Portland. In the background is a bridge, possibly the 1894 Burnside Bridge. The view is probably toward the north. The ship may also be depicted in image Nos. 373G0433, 373G0434, and 373G0435. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to negative damage.

Crown of Seville moored in Portland

Photograph showing a ship, the Crown of Seville, moored at a pier on the Willamette River in Portland. The text “S. S. Crown of Seville” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 376G0128. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Steamship English Monarch moored at Montgomery Dock No. 2, Portland

Photograph showing the steamer English Monarch moored at Montgomery Dock No. 2 in Portland in September 1912. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, September 15, 1912, under the headline “British Steamer to Load 260,00 Bushels of Wheat Here.” The photograph had the following caption: “The British steamer, English Monarch, Captain Walker, which arrived in port last week from British Columbia to load wheat for the United Kingdom under charter to Balfour, Guthrie, & Co. She is the first of the grain steamers to arrive here for the new crop season, and she will take out over 260,000 bushels of wheat. On her arrival at Montgomery dock No. 2, Frank Wilson, a watchman over the Chinese crew, fell dead as he was picking up a mooring line on the dock. The English Monarch will take out one of the largest cargoes of wheat that has been set afloat on a steamer here.” Image note: The text “British steamer English Monarch” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. The text “S. S. English Monarch” is written on the negative sleeve.

Steamship Monadnock moored at Crown Mills dock in Portland

Photograph showing the steamer Monadnock, based in Bristol, moored at the Crown Mills dock on the Willamette River in Portland. The number 147 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper right corner of the image. The text “#99” was etched onto the negative but then crossed out. The text “S. S. Monadnock, Bristol” is written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Oil tanker Swiftscout after launch on Willamette River, Portland

Photograph showing a group of people standing at the bow of the oil tanker Swiftscout after its launch on the Willamette River in Portland on Saturday, March 12, 1921. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0104 were published on Page 13, Section 3, of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, March 13, 1921. The photographs were published under the headline “Boy Scouts Christen Big Oil Tanker.” This photograph had the following caption: “ ‘Swiftscout,’ the oil tanker launched Saturday under the sponsorship of the Portland Council of Boy Scouts.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Boy Scouts Put In Charge Of Ship Launching.” According to the story, the ship was one of four oil tankers to be constructed for the Swiftsure Oil Transport Company. See additional related image No. 376G0105. Image note: Upper right corner of negative is broken off.

Shriners in formation at Multnomah Field, Portland

Photograph showing Shriners bands and patrols in formation on Multnomah Field in Portland. The stands are filled with spectators. The photograph may have been taken Thursday, June 24, 1920, during the Shriners convention held in Portland that year. Image note: Light leak on negative. The text “Grand Review of Shrine / Multnomah Field” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 376G0317.

Firefighters climbing to roof of building at Second and Pine, Portland

Photograph showing fire trucks parked outside a building on Pine Street at Second in Portland (now Southwest Pine Street and Southwest Second Avenue). A ladder extends from one of the trucks to the roof of the building, and several firefighters are carrying a hose up the ladder. Two more men are standing on the roof of the building. A related photograph, image No. 373G458, was published on Page 7 of a special year-end section in the Oregon Journal on Saturday, December 27, 1913. That photograph was one of seven published under the headline “Portland Affords Adequate Protection Against Fire.” The photographs accompanied a story about the expansion and cost of the fire department and the number of fire alarms in 1913. Also see additional related image No. 373G0456. Image note: The number 120 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. The number 132 was also written on the negative, then crossed out.

Prohibition agents S. F. Rutter, and J. P. Marstella in Portland

Photograph showing Federal Prohibition Field Agents S. F. Rutter of San Francisco and J. P. Marstella of Washington, D.C., standing at the bottom of a set of steps outside a building. They are looking at one another and smiling. This photograph was taken in March 1920 while Rutter and Marstella were visiting Portland to evaluate prohibition enforcement. The Oregon Journal published a related photograph, image No. 376G0193, and a story about Rutter and Marstella’s visit on Page 4 of the city edition on March 16, 1920. See additional related image No. 376G0191. Image note: Negative damage at upper right. The text “Prohibition officers” is written on the negative sleeve.

Prohibition agents Fred B. Curry, Johnson S. Smith, J. E. Flanders, S. F. Rutter, and J. P. Marstella in Portland

Photograph showing a group of men, all wearing suits and ties, gathered at the bottom of steps outside a building. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Tuesday, March 16, 1920, under the headline “Prohibition Agents Visit Portland.” The caption was: “Special prohibition field agents visit officials who are directing enforcement of national prohibition act in Oregon. From left—Federal Prohibition Inspector Fred B. Curry, Federal Prohibition Supervisor for Oregon Johnson S. Smith, Federal prohibition Agent J. E. Flanders and S. F. Rutter of San Francisco and J. P. Marstella of Washington, D. C., special prohibition agents touring the Pacific coast. The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Dry Nation Has Come To Stay, Officials Say,” about Rutter and Marstella’s visit to Portland. See related image Nos. 376G0191 and 376G0192. Image note: The text “Prohibition office” is written on the negative sleeve.

Customers and police officer outside closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing unidentified customers and a police officer outside the Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. At left, an unidentified man is walking past as a second unidentified man speaks to a police officer who is standing in front of the doorway to the bank. A similar photograph, image No. 373G0336, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 27, 1920, under the headline “Bond Purchasers Wait; Etheridge Flees.” The photograph had the following caption: “Some of the customers of Morris Brothers, Inc., who gathered at the iron barred door today and tried to gain admittance to ascertain the status of their investments. The police moved on them unceremoniously whenever the crowd got too large.” The photograph accompanied a story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See additional related image Nos. 376G0016 and 376G0018.

Augusta Carlson, witness at murder trial of John Cyril Liard

Three-quarters portrait of a woman, Augusta Carlson, sitting in a chair, facing slightly right, with her hands folded in her lap. She is wearing a hat, fur-trimmed jacket, and dress or skirt. The text “Carlson, Miss,” is written on the negative sleeve. Carlson was a witness in the trial of John Cyril Liard, who was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that Carlson had told police she was in the car. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0331, of Liard, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein's court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Suspect George Billings, alias Joe Brady, at Multnomah County jail

Half-length portrait of George Billings facing front and smiling at the Multnomah County Jail. Billings was a suspect in a burglary case. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, January 27, 1921, under the headline “Held On Crime Charges.” The photograph had the following caption: “George Billings, alias Joe Brady, photographed in cell at county jail this morning, after refusal of Captain Harry Circle of police detective department to allow such picture taken Wednesday in the city jail, despite orders from Chief Jenkins that photographers be allowed to pose prisoner. Brady was affable and chatty making no objection to flashlight.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Brady Says He’s Goat; 2 Identify Him.” On Sunday, March 5, 1921, the Journal reported that a grand jury had indicted Billings on three charges. Subsequently, on Friday, April 15, 1921, the Journal reported that a jury had acquitted Billings of one charge and the other two indictments had been dismissed. Image note: The text “Brady, Joe / Billings” is written on the negative sleeve.

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