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1888 Oregon City suspension bridge?

Photograph, taken from one end, showing a wooden suspension bridge, probably the 1888 bridge over the Willamette River between West Linn and Oregon City. That bridge was replaced with the current arch bridge in 1922. The text “Bridges - Clackamas County” is written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Light leak on negative.

1888 Oregon City suspension bridge?

Photograph, taken from one end, showing a wooden suspension bridge, probably the 1888 bridge over the Willamette River between West Linn and Oregon City. That bridge was replaced with the current arch bridge in 1922. The text “Bridges - Clackamas County” is written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Light leak on negative.

1894 Burnside Bridge

Photograph showing the 1894 Burnside Bridge in Portland. The photograph was probably taken from the east side of the Willamette River, facing west and showing the north side of the bridge.

Artisans Building, Broadway and Oak, Portland

Photograph showing the Artisans Building at the northwest corner of Broadway and Oak (now Southwest Broadway and Southwest Oak Street) in Portland. The Lumbermens Trust Company is on the ground floor. The photograph was taken from a high angle on the southeast corner of the intersection.

Augusta Carlson, witness at murder trial of John Cyril Liard

Three-quarters portrait of a woman, Augusta Carlson, sitting in a chair, facing slightly right, with her hands folded in her lap. She is wearing a hat, fur-trimmed jacket, and dress or skirt. The text “Carlson, Miss,” is written on the negative sleeve. Carlson was a witness in the trial of John Cyril Liard, who was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that Carlson had told police she was in the car. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0331, of Liard, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein's court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Balfour-Guthrie Building, Park and Oak streets, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the two-story Balfour-Guthrie Building at the corner of Park and Oak streets (now Southwest Park Avenue and Southwest Oak Street) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Development Section in the Oregon Journal Year’s End Number on Friday, December 26, 1913. The image was among a full page of photographs showing office buildings constructed in Portland in 1913. The photographs were published under the headline “Eleven Business Blocks Constructed During Year.” According to information on the page, the Balfour-Guthrie Building was constructed at a cost of $37,000. Image note: The number 141 is written on the negative. The number 157 was also written on the negative, then crossed out. It is visible in the upper right corner of the image.

Barney Oldfield

Head and shoulders portrait of Barney Oldfield, an auto racer and president of the Oldfield Tire Company. He is facing to the right and smoking a cigar. He is wearing a hat, suit jacket, collared shirt, and tie. The name “Oldfield, Barney” is written on the negative sleeve. The photograph was probably taken in January 1920, when Oldfield visited Portland on business. See related image No. 373G0150.

Barney Oldfield and unidentified man holding Oldfield tire

Full-length portrait of Barney Oldfield (left), an auto racer and president of the Oldfield Tire Company, and an unidentified man standing outside the Fletcher & James tire shop in Portland. They are holding an Oldfield tire. The name “Oldfield, Barney” is written on the negative sleeve. The photograph was probably taken in January 1920, when Oldfield visited Portland on business and stopped at Fletcher & James, a distributor of Oldfield tires. See related image No. 373G0151.

Belle Court apartments, Trinity Place, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of a five-story brick apartment building, Belle Court, on Trinity Place off Washington Street (now Northwest Trinity Place off West Burnside Street) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0187 were published on Page 4 of the Development Section in the Oregon Journal Year’s End Number on Friday, December 26, 1913. The photographs were published under the headline “Portland’s Apartment House Colony On The Increase.” This photograph had the following caption: “Belle Court apartments, Trinity Place.” The photographs accompanied a story, which had the headline “Apartments Rise to Fulfill Demands of Growing Population” and the subheading “Seven Hundred Thousand Dollars Invested in Flats and Apartment Houses in 1913.” The story contained the following information about Belle Court: “This new building, recently opened, cost about $100,000.” Image note: The number 140 is written on the negative. The number 156 was also written on the negative, then crossed out.

Ben W. Olcott and Walter M. Pierce at Oregon State Capitol

Full-length portrait of Ben W. Olcott (left) and Walter M. Pierce (right) standing outside the Oregon State Capitol in Salem. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Tuesday, January 9, 1923, under the headline “Retiring and Incoming Governors.” The photograph had the following caption: “Photograph taken in Salem, Monday, showing Ben Olcott (left), the retiring governor, and Governor Walter M. Pierce, standing together in the Capitol rotunda.” Pierce was inaugurated on January 8, 1923. The photograph accompanied a story about Olcott's final speech and the text of Pierce’s inaugural address to the Legislature.

Benson Polytechnic School

Photograph showing the exterior of a new Benson Polytechnic School building at what is now Northeast 12th Avenue and Northeast Irving Street in Portland. The school is now known as Benson Polytechnic High School. The Oregon Journal published one of two related photographs, 376G0354 or 376G0355, on Sunday, December 30, 1917. Image note: The text “Benson Polytechnic School” is written on the negative sleeve.

Benson Polytechnic School

Photograph, taken from a high angle, showing the exterior of a new Benson Polytechnic School building and the surrounding grounds at what is now Northeast 12th Avenue and Northeast Irving Street in Portland. The school is now known as Benson Polytechnic High School. A cropped version of either this photograph or a nearly identical image, No. 376G0355, was published on Page 10, Section Two, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 30, 1917. The photograph was published under the headline “New Plant of Benson Polytechnic School For Boys.” It had the following caption: “The Benson Polytechnic school, one of the finest institutions of its kind, now occupies its new plant at East Twelfth and East Couch streets, where excellent facilities are afforded for teaching the skilled trades.” A story on the same page, headlined “Portland’s Library And Public Schools Awake to Times / Public Schools Fully Meet Demands Imposed by War” included the following information about the school and new building: “The Benson Polytechnic school for boys, now housed in its new plant, is the finest institution of its kind on the Pacific coast. When fully completed the school will consist of 10 units. The subjects taught include many of the practical phases designed to fit the students to battle with the technical world. The enrollment is now 500 and the capacity of the school is 2000 when all units shall have been finished.” Also see related image No. 376G0353. Image note: The text “Benson Polytechnic School” is written on the negative sleeve.

Benson Polytechnic School

Photograph, taken from a high angle, showing the exterior of a new Benson Polytechnic School building and the surrounding grounds at what is now Northeast 12th Avenue and Northeast Irving Street in Portland. The school is now known as Benson Polytechnic High School. A cropped version of either this photograph or a nearly identical image, No. 376G0354, was published on Page 10, Section Two, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 30, 1917. The photograph was published under the headline “New Plant of Benson Polytechnic School For Boys.” It had the following caption: “The Benson Polytechnic school, one of the finest institutions of its kind, now occupies its new plant at East Twelfth and East Couch streets, where excellent facilities are afforded for teaching the skilled trades.” A story on the same page, headlined “Portland’s Library And Public Schools Awake to Times / Public Schools Fully Meet Demands Imposed by War” included the following information about the school and new building: “The Benson Polytechnic school for boys, now housed in its new plant, is the finest institution of its kind on the Pacific coast. When fully completed the school will consist of 10 units. The subjects taught include many of the practical phases designed to fit the students to battle with the technical world. The enrollment is now 500 and the capacity of the school is 2000 when all units shall have been finished.” Also see related image No. 376G0353. Image note: The text “Benson Polytechnic School” is written on the negative sleeve.

Big Sandy camp

Photograph showing a camp at Big Sandy Dam, made up of wooden buildings surrounded by trees. Electric lines and utility poles can be seen throughout the image. Written on the negative is “339 Big Sandy Camp.”

Big Sandy camp

Photograph showing a camp at Big Sandy Dam, made up of wooden buildings surrounded by trees. The buildings are in a row on a gradual incline, and piles of wood and cut trees can be seen. Written on the negative is “340 Big Sandy Camp.”

Bishop J. P. McClosky in Portland en route to to the Philippines

Half-length portrait of a clergyman facing to the right. The photograph was taken in Portland on Saturday, July 21, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “New Bishop To The Philippine Islands.” It had the caption “Rt. Rev. J. P. McClosky.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Catholic Leaders Of East Are Guests of Clergy In Portland.” According to the story, McClosky stopped in Portland on his way to the Philippines to assume a post as bishop. Traveling with him as far as San Francisco were prominent clergy from Buffalo, New York, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The story reported that McClosky and his party were the guests of local Catholic clergy and the Knights of Columbus. Image note: The text “McClosky, Rt. Rev.” is written on the negative sleeve.

Bishop J. P. McClosky with group in Portland

Full-length portrait of Bishop J. P. McClosky with a group of unidentified men, most of them clergy. McClosky (left) and another clergyman are sitting in chairs, and the others are standing in a row behind them. The photograph was taken in Portland on Saturday, July 21, 1917, when McClosky stopped in Portland on his way to the Philippines to assume a post as bishop. The Oregon Journal published a story and image No. 376G0211 of McClosky on Page 9 that day. According to the story, McClosky was accompanied by his secretary and a party of prominent clergy from Buffalo, New York, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who were traveling with him as far as San Francisco. The story reported that McClosky and his party were the guests of local Catholic clergy and the Knights of Columbus. Image note: The text “McClosky, Rt. Rev. and bishops” is written on the negative sleeve. Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Boats and ships on Willamette River, Portland

Photograph showing boats and ships on the Willamette River in Portland. In the background is a bridge, probably the 1894 Burnside Bridge. The view is probably to the north. The three-masted ship at left may be the same ship depicted in image Nos. 373G0433, 373G0434, and 373G0436. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to negative damage.

Boy Scout Harold Adams christening oil tanker Swiftscout in Portland

Photograph showing Boy Scout Harold Adams of Troop 49 standing next to the bow of the new oil tanker Swiftscout and holding a bottle wrapped in ribbons. An unidentified man is next to him at right. The photograph was taken on Saturday, March 12, 1921, at the launching of the Swiftscout in Portland. Adams christened the new ship. The Oregon Journal published two photographs, image Nos. 376G0103 and 376G0104, and a story about the launching on Page 13, Section 3, of the city edition on Sunday, March 13, 1921. According to the story, headlined “Boy Scouts In Charge Of Ship Launching,” Adams was “the Boy Scout who has advanced farthest in scouting in Portland,” and the bottle he his holding was filled with water from Wahtum Lake.

Boy Scout Harold Adams christening oil tanker Swiftscout in Portland

Photograph showing a teenage boy facing the bow of an oil tanker, the Swiftscout, and holding a bottle wrapped in ribbons. An unidentified man is next to him at right. The photograph was taken on Saturday, March 12, 1921, at the launching of the Swiftscout in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0103 were published on Page 13, Section 3, of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, March 13, 1921. The photographs were published under the headline “Boy Scouts Christen Big Oil Tanker.” This photograph had the following caption: “Harold Adams, member of troop 49, who christened the ‘Swiftscout.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Boy Scouts In Charge Of Ship Launching.” According to the story, Adams was “the Boy Scout who has advanced farthest in scouting in Portland,” and the bottle he his holding was filled with water from Wahtum Lake. See additional related image No. 376G0105. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Bridge over Oregon Slough on Vancouver Line

Photograph of unidentified bridge crossing body of water, with shoreline visible at right side of image. Taken from a straight vantage point looking down the tracks, a train can be seen in the distance, as well as numerous wooden buildings and electric lines. Likely the same bridge shown in PGE 132-1.

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