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Portland (Or.) glass plate negatives With digital objects
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Barney Oldfield and unidentified man holding Oldfield tire

Full-length portrait of Barney Oldfield (left), an auto racer and president of the Oldfield Tire Company, and an unidentified man standing outside the Fletcher & James tire shop in Portland. They are holding an Oldfield tire. The name “Oldfield, Barney” is written on the negative sleeve. The photograph was probably taken in January 1920, when Oldfield visited Portland on business and stopped at Fletcher & James, a distributor of Oldfield tires. See related image No. 373G0151.

Vice President Calvin Coolidge breaking ground for Roosevelt statue, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, August 15, 1922, showing Vice President Calvin Coolidge turning the first shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for the Theodore Roosevelt statue in Portland’s south park blocks. A crowd is watching in the background. A similar photograph, image No. 373G0037, was published on Page 7 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, August 13, 1922. See additional related image Nos. 373G0031, 373G0032, 373G0034, 373G0035, and 379G0023.

William Gibbs McAdoo speaking at cornerstone ceremony in Portland

Photograph, taken on Wednesday, October 10, 1917, showing United States treasury secretary William Gibbs McAdoo speaking on a flag-draped platform in Portland during a ceremony to lay the cornerstone for a new post office at Park and Glisan (now NW Park Avenue and NW Glisan Street). A cropped and reversed version of this image was one of two photographs of McAdoo’s address that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day. The two photographs were published beneath the following caption: “William Gibbs McAdoo, secretary of the treasury, addressing throng in the North Park blocks this morning in celebration of laying cornerstone for new Portland postoffice. The event opened the busy day for the head of the nation’s financial affairs in urging renewed vigor for Liberty Loan. Picture at right [referring to this image] shows Secretary McAdoo “close up” in characteristic speaking pose.” The photographs accompanied three stories about McAdoo’s visit: One headlined “Says We’ll Make Kaiser Bill Look Like 30 Cents”; one headlined “Sec. M’Adoo Speaks to Crowd at Laying of the Cornerstone”; and one headlined “Secretary M’Adoo Comes Here to Urge Liberty Bond Sales.”

President Woodrow Wilson in car during procession through Portland

Photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson standing in the back of his car and doffing his hat during a procession through Portland on Monday, September 15, 1919. Seated next to him at right is Oregon Governor Ben W. Olcott; seated next to him at left is C. S. Jackson, the owner, editor, and publisher of the Oregon Journal. Wilson was in Portland as part of a national speaking tour to build support for the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations. See related image Nos. 373G0223, 373G0224, 373G0226, 373G0227, 373G0228, and 373G0538. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

President Woodrow Wilson in car during procession through Portland

Photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Edith Wilson riding in a car during a procession through Portland on Monday, September 15, 1919. The president and first lady were in Portland as part of Woodrow Wilson’s national speaking tour to build support for the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “President and Mrs. Wilson in Portland.” See related image Nos. 373G0223, 373G0224, 373G0225, 373G0227, 373G0228, and 373G0538.

President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Edith Wilson in car leaving Union Station

Photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Edith Wilson seated in a car as they leave Union Station in Portland on Monday, September 15, 1919. The president and first lady were in Portland as part of Woodrow Wilson’s national speaking tour to build support for the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative. See related image Nos. 373G0223, 373G0224, 373G0225, 373G0226, and 373G0228.

T. J. James, Hyman H. Cohen, and H. A. King with new Oregon Journal printing press

Photograph showing (from left) T. J. James, Hyman H. Cohen, and H. A. King with the Oregon Journal’s new press at the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) at Broadway and Yamhill in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, February 3, 1922. The photographs were published under the headline “Journal’s Newest Press in Service Today.” The photographs had the following caption: “Two views of The Journal’s new high speed octuple press which was operated today for the first time. Its inclusion gives The Journal a battery of four presses having a combined capacity of 208 pages. Below are shown Hyman H. Cohen, market editor (center), starting the press and T. J. James, foreman of the composing room (left), removing the first paper from it. Cohen and James have been with The Journal since its establishment March 10, 1902. At the right is H. A. King, veteran press room foreman.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the new press.

1894 Burnside Bridge

Photograph showing the 1894 Burnside Bridge in Portland. The photograph was probably taken from the east side of the Willamette River, facing west and showing the north side of the bridge.

Members of Belgian mission and trench dog Nellie at North Bank station, Portland

Photograph showing members of the Belgian mission to the United States on the train platform at North Bank station in Portland on Tuesday, July 10, 1917. At center is Major Leon Osterreith, holding the leash of dog sitting at his feet. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 11 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, July 15, 1917, under the headline “Belgium’s Story Stirs Portland.” The photograph had the following caption: “Baron [Ludovic] Moncheur [second from left], head of the Belgian mission to the United States; Hugh Gibson [third from left], representing the state department, and Major Osterieth [sic] with his celebrated trench dog “Nellie,” photographed on the occasion of their Portland visit Tuesday, which was featured by the unfolding of Belgium’s story before the delegates and visitors to the N. E. A. [Nation Education Association] convention assembled in the Auditorium.” The photograph accompanied a brief story describing the reaction to the mission’s address before the convention. See related image No. 376G0208. Image note: The text “Belgian mission” is written on the negative sleeve.

Lt. C. J. White, Lt. Col. C. D. Murray, Brigadier General W. A. White, and Col. Duff Stewart at Union Station, Portland

Full-length portrait of four men, all in military dress, standing in a row on a train platform at Union Station in Portland on Wednesday, August 15, 1917. Second from right is British army Brigadier General W. A. White; he and his party were in Portland as part of an effort, led by White, to recruit British citizens in the United States for military service in World War I. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 16 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, August 16, 1917, under the headline “Welcome Given General White Of British Recruiting Mission.” The photograph had the following caption: “Left to right—Lieutenant C. J. White, son of General White; Lieutenant Colonel C. D. Murray, Briagdier General W. A. White and Colonel Duff Stewart of Canadian Army.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Britain Wants Her Sons In This State To Rally To Colors” and the subheading “Brig. Gen. W. A. White Paints Black Future for Slackers After the War.” See related image Nos. 376G0220 and 376G0221. Image note: The text “White, General and staff” is written on the negative sleeve.

Nellie Cushman

Head and shoulders portrait of a woman, Nellie Cushman, sitting in a chair, facing front, and looking right, toward a window. She is wearing a hat, glasses, coat, and blouse or dress. A cropped version of this photograph and a story were published on Page 14 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, January 31, 1921, under the headline “Woman Is Experienced Miner / Took $100,000 From Claim.” The photograph had the following caption: “Miss Nellie Cushman, on visit here from Alaska.” The story reported that Cushman “is in Portland after traveling more than 480 miles of Alaska’s most frigid domain by dog team as the first step in a trip that will take her to Bisbee, Ariz., to visit relatives.” The story also reported: “Miss Cushman has been in Alaska much of the time since 1874 and there became the owner of claim No. 19 on Bonanza creek at Dawson, from which she took out more than $100,000 in gold. She was among the first to go to Fairbanks when gold was discovered there.”

Major General George W. Goethals in Portland

Half-length portrait of Major General George W. Goethals after his arrival in Portland on Monday, August 30, 1915. He is facing to the right and may be sitting in a vehicle. Goethals was chief engineer of the Panama Canal construction project and subsequently governor of the Panama Canal Zone. In a front-page story on August 30, the Journal reported that Goethals and his family were visiting Portland for three days on their way to the Panama-Pacific exposition. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, August 31, 1915, under the headline “Photograph of Major General G. W. Goethals.” It accompanied the continuation of a front-page story headlined “General Goethals Is Too Modest To Talk About Canal Work” and a Page 4 story headlined “Goethals Urges New System of Cargo Measuring.” Image note; The name “Goethals” and the number 125 are written on the negative. The number 525 was also written on the negative, then crossed out. On the negative is a tape frame around Goethals.

Joe Harty, news vendor, at Washington and Broadway, Portland

Full-length portrait of newsboy Joe Harty holding an armful of newspapers and looking at a flock of pigeons in the street in front of him. Harty, whose legs were amputated in a train accident when he was a child, is sitting on a board mounted on a roller skate. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 14 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, October 22, 1919. The photograph had the following caption: “Joe Harty, Portland’s favorite newsboy, whose happy disposition at his stand at Washington and Broadway makes it a ‘sunshine corner.’ “ Accompanying the photograph was a brief column, “The Stroller Notices,” devoted to Harty’s good cheer. In an earlier story on April 13, 1920, Harty described how he had lost his legs and devised the board and roller skate that he used to get around.

John A. Johnson, manager of Pantages Theatre, Portland

Half-length portrait of John A. Johnson, manager of the Pantages Theatre in Portland, sitting at a desk in November 1920. He is facing to the right and looking toward the front. He is holding a flier for the film “Dead Men Tell No Tales.” A story about Johnson and a cropped version of this photograph were published on Page 3, Section 5 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Sunday, November 28, 1920. The photograph was published under the headline “Who’s Who On Broadway--And Off.” It had the following caption: “ ‘Jack’ Johnson is right bower in Pantages organization after 16 years as manager of local theatre. Has spent 31 years in the game and acquired an ample girth while working 16 to 18 hours a day, more or less.” See related image No. 376G0391.

Captain J. Yawata of ocean liner Anyo Maru

Full-length portrait of Captain J. Yawata of the ocean liner Anyo Maru. He is facing to the right and is wearing an overcoat and visor cap. The photograph was probably taken on January 17, 1921, when the Anyo Maru was in Portland. The text “Anyo Maru and Capt. J. Yawata” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 376G0117 and 376G0118.

St. Agatha Catholic Church, East 15th and Nehalem, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of St. Agatha Catholic Church at East Fifteenth and Nehalem streets (now Southeast 15th Avenue and Southeast Nehalem Street) in Portland. A cropped version of either this photograph or image No. 376G0175, which is nearly identical, was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Saturday, October 9, 1920, under the headline “St. Agathas Church In Sellwood Dedicated.” The photograph had the following caption: “St. Agathas Catholic church, corner Fifteenth and Nehalem streets, Sellwood, which was dedicated Sunday morning with impressive ceremonies.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Pontifical Mass Blesses Church.” Image note: Scratch at bottom of negative.

St. Agatha Catholic Church, East 15th and Nehalem, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of St. Agatha Catholic Church at East Fifteenth and Nehalem streets (now Southeast 15th Avenue and Southeast Nehalem Street) in Portland. A cropped version of either this photograph or image No. 376G0174, which is nearly identical, was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Saturday, October 9, 1920, under the headline “St. Agathas Church In Sellwood Dedicated.” The photograph had the following caption: “St. Agathas Catholic church, corner Fifteenth and Nehalem streets, Sellwood, which was dedicated Sunday morning with impressive ceremonies.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Pontifical Mass Blesses Church.” Image note: Scratch at bottom of negative.

Bishop J. P. McClosky in Portland en route to to the Philippines

Half-length portrait of a clergyman facing to the right. The photograph was taken in Portland on Saturday, July 21, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “New Bishop To The Philippine Islands.” It had the caption “Rt. Rev. J. P. McClosky.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Catholic Leaders Of East Are Guests of Clergy In Portland.” According to the story, McClosky stopped in Portland on his way to the Philippines to assume a post as bishop. Traveling with him as far as San Francisco were prominent clergy from Buffalo, New York, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The story reported that McClosky and his party were the guests of local Catholic clergy and the Knights of Columbus. Image note: The text “McClosky, Rt. Rev.” is written on the negative sleeve.

First Presbyterian Church, Portland, with steeple damaged by lightning

Photograph showing the steeple of the First Presbyterian Church at 11th and Alder streets (now Southwest 11th Avenue and Southwest Alder Street) in Portland on Saturday, July 17, 1920, after it was damaged by lightning. The Oregon Journal published a related photograph, image No. 376G0315, and a story about the damage on the front page of Its July 17 city edition. The story had the headline “Steeple Is Shattered By Electric Bolt” and the subheading “Patrolman C. C. Martin, Seeking Shelter From Storm, Knocked Senseless When Shock Hits Edifice; Rain Puts Out Fire.”

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