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Sam Meyer of Hippodrome Theater

Half-length portrait of a man sitting at a desk and holding a pen in one hand and a cigar in the other. He is facing slightly right and is wearing glasses, a suit jacket and vest, a collared shirt, and a tie. The name “Meyer, Sam” and “Hippodrome Theater” are written on the negative sleeve. Image note: Spots on negative.

Barney Oldfield

Head and shoulders portrait of Barney Oldfield, an auto racer and president of the Oldfield Tire Company. He is facing to the right and smoking a cigar. He is wearing a hat, suit jacket, collared shirt, and tie. The name “Oldfield, Barney” is written on the negative sleeve. The photograph was probably taken in January 1920, when Oldfield visited Portland on business. See related image No. 373G0150.

W. J. Babe and F. D. Hobbs, railroad union officials, outside Imperial Hotel, Portland

Full-length portrait of two men, both wearing suits, hats, and ties, standing on the sidewalk outside the Imperial Hotel in Portland on Saturday, April 10, 1920. That day, a nearly identical photograph, image No. 376G0376, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition under the headline “Union Officials Here to Combat Strike.” The photograph had the following caption: “Two prominent officials of the trainmen’s organizations, who are in Portland doing their best to bring about a speedy settlement of the ‘rebel’ strike which has broken out among the switchmen. They are: Left, W. J. Babe, national deputy vice president of the Brotherhood of Railway [sic] Trainmen, and right, F. D. Hobbs, general chairman of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen of the O-W. R & N. [Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company] system, photographed by The Journal staff photographer today at their headquarters in the Imperial hotel.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Brotherhood Official Says Use Lever Act To Defeat Radicals.” The story was one of four front-page articles about the strike, which was occurring in cities around the United States. See additional related image No. 376G0374. Image note: On the negative, the name “W. J. Babe” is written above the man at left, and the name “Hobb [sic]” is written above the man at right.

Cattle in stockyard at Union Meat Company

Photograph showing cattle in pens at the Union Meat Company stockyard in North Portland. In the background at right is the Union Meat plant. The number 46 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper right corner. It is written next to the number 147, which has been crossed out. See related image No. 376G0339 and image No. 376G0340, which may also be related.

Veterans of Foreign Wars ceremony on Armistice Day, 1920

Photograph showing veterans gathered in the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland for a remembrance ceremony on November 11, 1920, Armistice Day. At center are two men standing behind a small table draped with a cloth. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, November 14, 1920, under the headline “Veterans Give Remembrance Pledge.” The photograph had the following caption: “Unique ceremony of Over the Top Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, at G. A. R. [Grand Army of the Republic] hall, court house, on Armistice day. A[t] altar (left), Chaplain W. H. Butler; (right) Acting Chaplain Dr. C. W. Huett, pastor of Rose City Park Methodist Episcopal church. On the rostrum, in charge of ritualistic service, Comrade Commander M. C. Watson. The pledge of remembrance, repeated by all the men in unison: ‘Remember our men of the world war and all who gave their lives for our nation’s honor on foreign soils or hostile seas.’ ”

University of Oregon Medical School, Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the three-story University of Oregon Medical School building on Marquam Hill in Portland in July 1919. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 7, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, July 20, 1919, under the headline “U. of O. Medical School.” The photograph had the following caption: “ First building on University of Oregon medical school’s new campus, on Marquam hill.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Medical School of U. Of O. To Be Big Asset To City” and the subheadings “Opening of New Structure on Marquam Hill Will Take Place This Coming October 1. / Portland Will Be Center / Result of Expanding of Great Institution Will Make This City Headquarters in Northwest.” Image note: The text “Medical school” is written on the negative sleeve.

Members of Belgian mission and reception committee at North Bank station, Portland

Photograph showing a group of men standing in a row at the North Bank train station in Portland on Tuesday, July 10, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “Members of Belgian Commission Arrive in Portland, Are Greeted by Reception Committee.” The photograph had the following caption: “Picture of Belgian commissioners and some of the reception committee, taken at the North Bank station upon arrival of the commissioners: Left to right—Col. George S. Young, U. S. A.; Lieutenant Count d'Ursel; Major General Mathieu Leclercq; Governor [James] Withycombe; Baron [Ludovic] Moncheur, head of the mission; Mayor [George L.] Baker; Hugh Gibson, representing state department; Major [Leon] Osterieth [sic], battalion commander of First regiment of guides of the Belgian army, and Captain T. C. Cook, U. S. A. The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Oregon Gives Hands to Men From Belgium.” It also had the following subheadings: “Shower of Roses Greets the Members of Commission From That Heroic Nation Crumpled in Onslaught / Baron Moncheur Steps Smilingly From Train / Own Hope Renewed, He Says, When American Nation Entered War.” According to the story, the mission’s visit to Portland included a visit to the Eastern & Western Lumber Company, a trip on the Columbia River Highway, an appearance at the National Education Association convention, and a public reception in the south park blocks. See related image No. 376G0209. Image note: The text “Belgian mission” is written on the negative sleeve. Major Leon Osterreith's name was misspelled in the Journal caption.

Brigadier General W. A. White, British army, speaking to unidentified man at Union Station, Portland

Photograph showing Brigadier General W. A. White of the British army (right) speaking to an unidentified man at Union Station in Portland on Wednesday, August 15, 1917. The photograph was taken after White and his party arrived in Portland as part of an effort, led by White, to recruit British citizens in the United States for military service in World War I. A story about White and image No. 376G0222, depicting the general and his party, were published on Page 16 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, August 16, 1917. Also see additional related image No. 376G0220. Image note: The text “White, General and staff” is written on the negative sleeve.

Multnomah Guard marching on 6th Street, Portland, during War Activities parade

Photograph showing troops marching in formation past crowds of spectators on Sixth Street (now Southwest 6th Avenue) in Portland. The photograph was taken during the War Activities parade on Saturday, April 6, 1918. The parade was among events marking the issuance of the third Liberty Loan bond to finance the war effort during World War I. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition on Sunday, April 7, 1918. The photograph had the following caption: “The Multnomah Guard, Lieutenant Colonel John B. Hibbard commanding, made its first public appearance in War Activities parade Saturday.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Big Pageant Wins Cheers Of Throngs.” See related image Nos. 376G0308 and 376G0310.

Dr. C. U. Moore examining baby at Infant Welfare Association clinic, south Portland

Photograph showing Dr. C. U. Moore, medical director of a well-baby clinic in South Portland, listening to an unidentified baby’s lungs with a stethoscope. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 16, 1921, under the headline “Keeping Babies Well.” The photographs had the caption: “Views of Infant Welfare association clinic in South Portland.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Dr. C. U. Moore making lung test.” The photographs accompanied a story with the headline “Better Babies Is Object Off [sic] Clinic Conducted Here” and the subheading “Skeptical at First, Mothers Fast Learning Their Infants Thrive as Result of Recommendations.” Image note: The text “Moore, Dr.” is written on the negative sleeve.

Oregon Journal Knights of Kollodion on parade

Photograph showing eight people marching in single file on the sidewalk outside the Journal Building (now known as the Jackson Tower) in downtown Portland. The man in front is carrying a bass drum. The fourth person from rear is costumed in a wig, mask, and flowered dress, and is holding up a sign with the text “Merry Christmas from the Oregon Journal Knights of Kollodion.” The others are wearing funnels on their heads and carrying small instruments. See related image Nos. 373G0337, 373G0338, 373G0340, and 373G0341.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow carrying an unidentified person down a ladder on his back during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. A group of people are watching at right. On Page 12 of the Sunday, February 22, 1922 edition, the Oregon Journal published a story and four related photographs about a series of lecture demonstrations given by Longfellow in Portland. The story reported that Longfellow was a first-aid expert for the American Red Cross. He would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, the story reported, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0369, 373G0370, 373G0371, and 373G0372.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow carrying an unidentified man on his back during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. The two men are back to back, with a coat serving as a makeshift sling. Longfellow is wearing the top of the coat backward over his head like a hood, and the man being carried has his arms through the coat’s sleeves. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, February 22, 1920, under the headline “Illustrates Rescue Holds.” The photographs collectively had the single caption: “Novel ‘holds’ demonstrated Saturday by W. E. Longfellow, first aid expert for the American Red Cross, who is here to instruct Portland folk in life saving methods.” A story accompanying the photographs reported that Longfellow would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0368, 373G0369, 373G0371, and 373G0372.

Customers at Peoples Bank, Portland, on opening day

Photograph showing a crowd of customers inside Peoples Bank in Portland on the bank’s opening day, Tuesday, April 20, 1920. The bank was located in the new Gordon Building at Fourth and Stark (now Southwest Fourth Avenue and Southwest Stark Street). A cropped version of this photograph was one of two, along with image No. 373G0442, that was published on Page 1, Section 3, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, April 25, 1920, under the headline “Bank Has Long Lease on Gordon Building.” The photograph had the following caption: “Opening of Peoples bank Tuesday morning.” See additional related image No. 373G0443.

Journal Building, Broadway and Yamhill, Portland

Photograph, taken from a high vantage, showing the northwest corner of the Journal Building and part of the intersection of Yamhill and Broadway in Portland (now Southwest Yamhill Street and Southwest Broadway). The Oregon Journal occupied the building from 1912 until 1948; it is now known as the Jackson Tower.

Frank J. Cobbs house and grounds, Montgomery Drive, Portland

Photograph, taken from a high angle, showing the grounds and Jacobethan home of Frank J. Cobbs during construction in 1918. The home, located at what is now 2424 SW Montgomery Drive in Portland, was designed by architect Albert E. Doyle. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 373G0503 were published on Page 22 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, July 7, 1918. The photographs were published under the headline “Handsome Cobbs Home Nears Completion.” The pictures had the following caption: “Beautiful new home being built on Montgomery Drive for Frank J. Cobbs at a cost of approximately $150,000.” The photographs accompanied a story about the home.

Frank J. Cobbs house, Montgomery Drive, Portland

Photograph, taken from the road, showing the Jacobethan home of Frank J. Cobbs during construction in 1918. The home, located at what is now 2424 SW Montgomery Drive in Portland, was designed by architect Albert E. Doyle. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 373G0502 were published on Page 22 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, July 7, 1918. The photographs were published under the headline “Handsome Cobbs Home Nears Completion.” The pictures had the following caption: “Beautiful new home being built on Montgomery Drive for Frank J. Cobbs at a cost of approximately $150,000.” The photographs accompanied a story about the home.

Fenton Building, Sixth Street, Portland

Photograph showing the front exterior of the Fenton Building on Sixth Street (now Southwest Sixth Avenue) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1, Section 3, of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, March 13, 1921, under the headline “Fenton Building Sold.” The photograph had the following caption: “Structure on East Side of Sixth Street between Stark and Oak, purchased by Dundas & Martin company and subsidiary concerns.” The photograph accompanied a story about the sale, headlined “Fenton Building Is Purchased By Financial Group.” According to the story, “The Fenton building is a six-story and full basement brick structure built by Judge [William D.] Fenton in 1906 on a 50x100-foot lot on the east side of Sixth street between Stark and Oak, near the center of the present ‘financial row.’ The upper floors are devoted to offices, while the ground floor is occupied by retail stores.”

Balfour-Guthrie Building, Park and Oak streets, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the two-story Balfour-Guthrie Building at the corner of Park and Oak streets (now Southwest Park Avenue and Southwest Oak Street) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Development Section in the Oregon Journal Year’s End Number on Friday, December 26, 1913. The image was among a full page of photographs showing office buildings constructed in Portland in 1913. The photographs were published under the headline “Eleven Business Blocks Constructed During Year.” According to information on the page, the Balfour-Guthrie Building was constructed at a cost of $37,000. Image note: The number 141 is written on the negative. The number 157 was also written on the negative, then crossed out. It is visible in the upper right corner of the image.

Congress Hotel building, 6th and Main, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the eight-story Congress Hotel building at Sixth and Main streets (now Southwest 6th Avenue and Southwest Main Street) in Portland. The number 42 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. The text “Congress Hotel / Portland, Building” is written on the negative sleeve.

Marquam Building at 6th and Morrison, Portland, after partial collapse

Photograph showing the Marquam Building at Sixth and Morrison streets (now Southwest 6th Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street) after a section of the building collapsed on Thursday, November 11, 1921. A crowd is standing in the street below the building. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of an Oregon Journal extra on the day of the collapse. The photograph and a story were published under the headline “Big Cave-In Wrecks Marquam Building / Scores Menaced by Avalanche of Brick.” The photograph had the following caption: “Photograph shows great rent in Sixth street side of Marquam building; section of brick wall 16 feet wide by eight stories in height gives way and huge mass of debris is hurled to street below; blocking traffic; structure was undergoing alterations when underpinning is supposed to have given way.” The story reported that no one had been injured in the collapse. On November 25, 1912, the Journal reported that the owners of the building had decided to demolish the Marquam Building and construct a new building in its place. It was replaced by the Northwestern National Bank Building, now known as the American Bank Building. See related image No. 376G0343. Image note: The number 40 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper right corner of the image. The photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

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