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Dr. C. U. Moore examining baby at Infant Welfare Association clinic, south Portland

Photograph showing Dr. C. U. Moore, medical director of a well-baby clinic in South Portland, listening to an unidentified baby’s lungs with a stethoscope. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 16, 1921, under the headline “Keeping Babies Well.” The photographs had the caption: “Views of Infant Welfare association clinic in South Portland.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Dr. C. U. Moore making lung test.” The photographs accompanied a story with the headline “Better Babies Is Object Off [sic] Clinic Conducted Here” and the subheading “Skeptical at First, Mothers Fast Learning Their Infants Thrive as Result of Recommendations.” Image note: The text “Moore, Dr.” is written on the negative sleeve.

Man examining baby during eugenics test at Multnomah County Courthouse

Photograph showing an unidentified man examining an unidentified baby during a eugenics test at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland in April 1920. The man is holding a tongue depressor toward the baby’s open mouth. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on Page 12, the Mother’s Forum, of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, April 12, 1920. The photograph had the following caption: “One of the several examinations given in the eugenics tests made at the Parents’ Educational bureau, 551 courthouse, every Wednesday. The tests are for mental and physical defects and advice is given for their correction.”

Two patients receiving light therapy

Photograph showing two patients and medical personnel in a treatment room. The patients are probably receiving light therapy; one is lying on a table, face down, under a lamp, and a man in a white gown is standing next to the table. The other patient is seated on a table with one leg extended, and a woman in a white uniform is positioning a lamp over his leg. At the center of the image, on a small table, is a motor-generator, possibly used for electrotherapy.

Law enforcement officer?

Head and shoulders photograph showing an unidentified man, probably a law enforcement officer, looking to the right. He is wearing a hat and overcoat. See related image No., 373G0303, in which he is handcuffed to a man who may be a crime suspect; and additional related image Nos. 373G0304, 373G0314, and 379G0134.

Crime suspect?

Head and shoulders photograph showing an unidentified man facing right. He is wearing a hat, a collared shirt, and overalls. He may be a crime suspect. See related image Nos. 373G0303, in which he is handcuffed to a man who may be a law enforcement officer; and additional related image Nos. 373G0304, 373G0314, and 379G0213.

John Cyril Liard on witness stand

Photograph showing John Cyril Liard sitting on the witness stand in January 1919. Liard was on trial for second-degree murder in the death of Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley. Liard was accused of killing Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that a woman, Augusta Carlson, had told police she was in the car at the time of the murder. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G023, of Carlson, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein’s court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison. See additional related image No. 376G0330. Image note: The text “Laird [sic] trial” is written on the negative sleeve.

John Cyril Liard on witness stand during his murder trial

Photograph showing John Cyril Liard (center) sitting on the witness stand during his trial on a second-degree murder charge. At left are a group of men looking toward Liard. The photograph was probably taken on Saturday, January 11, 1919, when Liard took the stand in his own defense. Liard was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison. See related image Nos. 376G0023 and 376G0331. Image note: The text “Laird [sic] trial” is written on the negative sleeve.

John B. Kawacinski, killer of Harry I. Pawluk, at Multnomah County Jail

Head and shoulders portrait of a man at the Multnomah County Jail. He is sitting in a chair and facing to the right. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, March 7, 1921, under the headline “Slayer Of His Shipmate.” The photograph had the following caption: “John Boleslaw Kawacinski, known also as John Bruno, who has confessed to the killing of Harry I. Pawluk, second cook on the steamship Montague, arrested at Seattle Saturday and now being held in the Multnomah county jail while real facts of grim story of debt, smuggling, and intrigue are being straightened out by the authorities.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Murderer of Pawluk Views Crime Scene” and the subheading “John Kawacinski, Who Confessed He Killed Shipmate on Barnes Road, Pleads Self-Defense; Police Look for Woman in Case.” On Thursday, April 14, 1921, the Journal reported that Kawacinski had been convicted of second-degree murder, and on Monday, April 18, 1921, the paper reported that he had been sentenced to life in the Oregon State Penitentiary. Image note: The text “Bruno, John / Murderer of Pawluk” is written on the negative sleeve.

George Rossman in court on first day as Portland municipal judge

Photograph, taken from the side, showing Portland Municipal Judge George Rossman seated at the bench in a courtroom on Wednesday, August 1, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 14 of the Oregon Journal that day. The photograph had the headline “Succeeds To Municipal Bench” and the caption: “George Rossman, who began duties this morning laid down by John H. Stevenson.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Municipal Judge And New Chief Of Police Occupy Their Posts.” Image note: The text “Rossman, municipal judge / & courtroom - Portland” is written on the negative sleeve.

Car thieves Lawrence H. Murray? and Ben Lesmeister? outside cell door

Half-length portrait of two young men or teenage boys standing outside the barred door of a jail or prison cell and facing front. Written on the negative sleeve is the text “Murray, Mr and Lesmeier, Mr / Auto bandits.” The young men are probably Lawrence H. Murray and Ben Lesmeister of Portland. According to an article in the Oregon Journal on Saturday, July 17, 1920, Murray, Lesmeister, and a third young man, Lee B. Vale, were charged with stealing a car in interstate commerce and pleaded guilty. The Journal reported that Murray, Lesmeister, and Vale broke into a garage, stole a car, and drove it to Seattle, Washington, and back.

Suspect George Billings, alias Joe Brady, at Multnomah County jail

Half-length portrait of George Billings facing front and smiling at the Multnomah County Jail. Billings was a suspect in a burglary case. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, January 27, 1921, under the headline “Held On Crime Charges.” The photograph had the following caption: “George Billings, alias Joe Brady, photographed in cell at county jail this morning, after refusal of Captain Harry Circle of police detective department to allow such picture taken Wednesday in the city jail, despite orders from Chief Jenkins that photographers be allowed to pose prisoner. Brady was affable and chatty making no objection to flashlight.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Brady Says He’s Goat; 2 Identify Him.” On Sunday, March 5, 1921, the Journal reported that a grand jury had indicted Billings on three charges. Subsequently, on Friday, April 15, 1921, the Journal reported that a jury had acquitted Billings of one charge and the other two indictments had been dismissed. Image note: The text “Brady, Joe / Billings” is written on the negative sleeve.

Augusta Carlson, witness at murder trial of John Cyril Liard

Three-quarters portrait of a woman, Augusta Carlson, sitting in a chair, facing slightly right, with her hands folded in her lap. She is wearing a hat, fur-trimmed jacket, and dress or skirt. The text “Carlson, Miss,” is written on the negative sleeve. Carlson was a witness in the trial of John Cyril Liard, who was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that Carlson had told police she was in the car. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0331, of Liard, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein's court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Customers and police officer outside closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing unidentified customers and a police officer outside the Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. At left, an unidentified man is walking past as a second unidentified man speaks to a police officer who is standing in front of the doorway to the bank. A similar photograph, image No. 373G0336, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 27, 1920, under the headline “Bond Purchasers Wait; Etheridge Flees.” The photograph had the following caption: “Some of the customers of Morris Brothers, Inc., who gathered at the iron barred door today and tried to gain admittance to ascertain the status of their investments. The police moved on them unceremoniously whenever the crowd got too large.” The photograph accompanied a story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See additional related image Nos. 376G0016 and 376G0018.

Customers looking through gated door of closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing three unidentified men, probably customers, looking through the gated door of the he Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland, probably on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. In the December 27 city edition, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See related image Nos. 376G0016, 376G0018, and 373G0336.

Fred S. Morris, unidentified man, and U. S. Marshal John D. Mann

Photograph showing, from left, Fred S. Morris, an unidentified man, and Chief Deputy United States Marshal John D. Mann in Portland, possibly outside Pioneer Courthouse, on December 29, 1920. According to Journal stories published from December 27, 1920 to December 29, 1920, Fred S. Morris had been the head of the Morris Brothers investment bank; in 1919, he sold his interest to employee John L. Etheridge and others, and the bank became Morris Brothers, Inc. On December 27, 1920, the Journal reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and Etheridge, the bank president, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. The story also reported that Fred S. Morris had resumed control of the bank and officials were investigating whether to revoke Etheridge’s naturalized citizenship. On December 28, 1920, the Journal reported that federal officials were investigating whether Etheridge and Morris, who stood as a witness at Etheridge’s naturalization hearing, had concealed two prison sentences. On the front page of the December 29, 1920, city edition, the Journal published a story headlined “Fred Morris In Custody For Perjury / U. S. Warrant Accuses Him of Swearing Falsely as Witness for John L. Etheridge in 1918.” Accompanying the story was a cropped version of this photograph of Morris, an unidentified man, and Marshal Mann. The photograph was published under the headline “Bond Magnate in Toils” and had the following caption: “Fred S. Morris (at left) who was taken into custody this morning by federal authorities on a charge of fraud in aiding John L. Etheridge to obtain citizenship. Picture was taken when Chief Deputy Marshal Mann (at right) escorted Morris to safety deposit box to get securities for $2000 bond required by United States Commissioner [Kenneth] Fraser.” See related image Nos. 376G0017, 376G0018, and 373G0336. Image note: The text “Morris, Fred S.” is written on the negative sleeve.

Customers and police officer outside closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing unidentified customers and a police officer outside the Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. At left, two unidentified men are speaking to a police officer who is standing in front of the gated doorway to the bank. At right, a woman is looking through the gate and speaking to a man on the other side. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition on December 27, 1920, under the headline “Bond Purchasers Wait; Etheridge Flees.” The photograph had the following caption: “Some of the customers of Morris Brothers, Inc., who gathered at the iron barred door today and tried to gain admittance to ascertain the status of their investments. The police moved on them unceremoniously whenever the crowd got too large.” The photograph accompanied a story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See related image Nos. 376G0016, 376G0017, and 376G0018.

Crime suspect? standing with group

Photograph showing a group of unidentified men standing on a train platform. At center is a man in overalls who may be a crime suspect; in related image No. 373G0303, he is handcuffed the man in an overcoat who is standing to the left of him. Also see related image Nos. 373G0304, 376G0134, and 376G0213.

Crime suspect?

Head and shoulders portrait of an unidentified man, probably a crime suspect, facing right and looking toward the front. He is wearing a hat, a collared shirt, and overalls. See image Nos. 373G0303, in which he is handcuffed to another man, probably a law enforcement officer; and additional related image Nos. 373G0314, 376G0134, and 376G0213.

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