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Lieutenant Vern U. Ayres, pilot

Photograph of a photograph. The original picture is a head and shoulders portrait of a man wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a jacket, a collared shirt, and a tie. He is facing front and looking to the left. Crop marks have been drawn on the picture. The name “Ayres, Lt. V. V. [sic]” is written on the negative sleeve.

Dorothy Hester, pilot

Portrait of stunt pilot Dorothy Hester seated on top of an airplane with her legs in the cockpit. She is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a sweater, and a skirt. The text “Dorothy Hester” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Pilot Tex Rankin holding black cat

Photograph, taken on August 24, 1928, of pilot Tex Rankin holding a black cat he borrowed from a Portland girl, Carol Mangold, to take with him on a national air race from New York to Los Angeles. The cat was one of two “jinxes” that Rankin deliberately adopted for the race; the other was to enter his plane under the number 13. On August 24, the day Rankin departed, the Oregon Journal published a story on Page 2 about the pilot and the cat; the headline was “Rankin and His Jinxes Go East to Start Derby.”See related image Nos. 371N5919, 371N5920, 371N6220, and 371N6222. Also see the following images related to Rankin's return from the race: 371N5921, 371N5922, 371N5923, 371N6141, 371N6150, and 377N0032. Image note: The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image.

George O. Noville, F. V. Tompkins, and R. S. Allen at air circus on Swan Island, Portland

Portrait of three men standing next to an airplane, possibly a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, at Swan Island airport. The plane arrived in Portland on Saturday, June 9, 1928, and was on display at the airport on Sunday, June 10, 1928, during Portland’s second annual air circus. A cropped version of this photograph, along with a picture of the Ford-Stout plane, was published in the Oregon Journal on June 10, 1928, under the headline “Huge Avion Greeted With Acclaim.” This photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Commander George Noville, who flew across pole and over Atlantic with [Richard E.] Byrd; F. V. Tompkins, pilot of the giant aircraft, and R. S. Allen, assistant pilot.” In a front-page story that day, the Journal reported that Noville had arrived in Portland on the Ford-Stout plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2520, 371N5952. Image note: Double exposure. The text “Novill [sic] — Tompkins ?” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Two boys next to airplane with Santa Claus and pilot Gordon Mounce

Photograph showing two unidentified boys, an unidentified person dressed as Santa Claus, and pilot Gordon Mounce, all standing next to an airplane. The person in the Santa suit is kneeling in front of the two boys and is holding a bag in one hand and a doll in the other. The boys are dressed in uniforms. On the side of the plane are the words “Hill Aeronautical School / Portland, Oregon.” See related image No. 371N5535.

Two men with airplane in snow

Photograph showing two unidentified men standing in snow next to a Rasmussen Meadows company airplane. The man on the left, who may be pilot Les Meadows, is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a jacket, breeches, and boots. The man on the right, possibly from the Cascade Ski Club, is on skis and is holding ski poles. See related image Nos. 371N5553 and 371N5554.

Tex Rankin and unidentified man with airplane, “Queen of the Cascades”

Photograph of pilot Tex Rankin and an unidentified man standing next to an airplane with the words “Rankin School of Flying / Portland, Ore.” on the side. On the nose of the plane are words that are probably “ ‘Queen of the Cascades.’ ” See related image No. 371N6226. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Sydnor Hall, pilot

Portrait of a man wearing an aviator’s cap, goggles, and a collared shirt. The name “Sydnor Hall” and the number 3 are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N6104.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, seated in Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “Postmaster Also Goes by Air Mail.” The photograph had the following caption: “John M. Jones, head of Portland’s postoffice, as he appeared early today when he became a passenger with Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly, army flying ace at Vancouver barracks, to join air mail celebration at Pasco. Jones is in rear seat of plane piloted by Kelly.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to that story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on the morning of the first flight on the new route to participate in festivities marking the event. Image note: The text “Okley [sic] G Kelly and Postmaster Jones” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image. See related image No. 371N5910.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, standing next to Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A similar photograph of the two men, image No. 371N5909, was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day; it was part of the Journal’s coverage of the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to a front-page story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on April 6, the morning of the first flight on the new route, to participate in festivities marking the event.

Lieutenant L. C. Mallory, pilot, at air show

Portrait of a man seated in the cockpit of an airplane at either Swan Island airport in Portland or Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington. He is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was one of five, including image No. 371N0595, published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927, as part of coverage of an air show. The photographs were published under the headline “Z-O-O-M! These Are Lads Who Skim Towers!” With the photographs was the caption: “Some of the famous fliers whose stunts have thrilled thousands in Portland Tuesday and today.” The caption went on to identify the man in this photograph as L. C. Mallory. Image note: The text “Lut [sic] L. C. Mallory” and the number 6 are written on the negative and are visible on the left side of the image. Also see related image Nos. 371N6105, 371N6106, 371N6107, 371N6108, 371N6112, and 371N6126.

Les Meadows?, pilot, in airplane cockpit

Portrait of a man seated in the cockpit of an airplane. He is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles. A name that appears to be “Les Medowes” is written on the negative and is partially visible on the left side of the image, but is likely a misspelling. The man is probably pilot Les Meadows.

Sheriff Thomas M. Hurlburt presenting pilot Gordon Mounce with deputy badge

Photograph of Multnomah County Sheriff Thomas M. Hurlburt (left) presenting a deputy sheriff’s badge to pilot Gordon Mounce on April 25, 1928, when Mounce was sworn in as an aerial patrolman. They are standing next to a Continental Airways plane. The name “Mounce” and the number 18 are written on the negative and are visible in the image.

Lieutenant Paul E. Burrows, Army Air Corps

Portrait of a man in a United States military uniform and visor cap. He is standing next to an airplane and facing toward the right side of the image. The text “Lt. Paul E. Burrows” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. Burrows was commanding officer at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, from 1933 to 1939.

Tex and Shirley Rankin before endurance flight?

Photograph showing pilot Tex Rankin and an unidentified woman, probably his wife, Shirley, standing cheek to cheek. The photograph may have been taken at Rankin field in Portland on Sunday, August 17, 1930, before Rankin and his brothers, Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin, began their first attempt to set a record for endurance flying. The attempt, along with three subsequent tries later that month, was unsuccessful. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Sydnor Hall, pilot

Portrait of a man looking toward the left. He is wearing a collared shirt and an aviator’s cap and goggles. The number 4 and the name “Sydnor Hall” are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N5903.

Anthony Mackiewicz, Charles Dickinson, and E. E. Ballough in front of airplane

Photograph of (from left) Anthony Mackiewicz, Charles Dickinson, and pilot E. E. Ballough standing in a row in front of a biplane, probably at Swan Island airport in Portland. This photograph was taken on September 27, 1927, after Ballough took second place in the Class A race of a Spokane-to-Portland air derby. Dickinson was the passenger on the flight and Mackiewicz was the mechanic. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph, showing only Ballough and Dickinson, was one of four photographs, including image Nos. 371N6105 and 371N6126, published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927. The photographs were published under the headline “Adventurers of the Air Who Thrilled Portland Today.” This photograph identified the two men as E. E. Ballough and “Charles Dickinson of Chicago, ‘Santa Claus of the air mail.’ “ The photographs accompanied a continuation of a front-page story about the air races. Also see image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6106, 371N6107, and 371N6112. Image note: The text “Ballough - Dickinson” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

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