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Curtiss “Jenny” biplane in a field

Photograph, taken from the rear and side, showing a Curtiss JN-series biplane, known as the “Jenny.” The plane is parked in a field. The text “ ‘Jenny’ airplane” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 376G0117, 376G0118, 376G0120, and 376G0121.

Curtiss “Jenny” biplane in a field

Photograph, taken from the front and side, showing a Curtiss JN-series biplane, known as the “Jenny.” The plane is parked in a field. The text “ ‘Jenny’ airplane” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image Nos. 376G0117, 376G0118, 376G0119, and 376G0120.

Unidentified men with airplane hitched to tow truck at A. L. Campbell Auto Towing, Portland

Photograph showing several unidentified men looking at a parked tow truck outside A. L. Campbell Auto Towing in Portland. Hitched to the back of the truck is an airplane. The plane’s propeller is tied to the boom of the truck, and its back end of its fuselage is resting on two wheels. The plane’s wings are lashed to the top of the fuselage. The second man from left is wearing a coat with the text “G. G. Gerber” on the back.

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Two boys next to airplane with Santa Claus and pilot Gordon Mounce

Photograph showing two unidentified boys, an unidentified person dressed as Santa Claus, and pilot Gordon Mounce, all standing next to an airplane. The person in the Santa suit is kneeling in front of the two boys and is holding a bag in one hand and a doll in the other. The boys are dressed in uniforms. On the side of the plane are the words “Hill Aeronautical School / Portland, Oregon.” See related image No. 371N5535.

Two men with airplane in snow

Photograph showing two unidentified men standing in snow next to a Rasmussen Meadows company airplane. The man on the left, who may be pilot Les Meadows, is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a jacket, breeches, and boots. The man on the right, possibly from the Cascade Ski Club, is on skis and is holding ski poles. See related image Nos. 371N5553 and 371N5554.

Tex Rankin and unidentified man with airplane, “Queen of the Cascades”

Photograph of pilot Tex Rankin and an unidentified man standing next to an airplane with the words “Rankin School of Flying / Portland, Ore.” on the side. On the nose of the plane are words that are probably “ ‘Queen of the Cascades.’ ” See related image No. 371N6226. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Sheriff Thomas M. Hurlburt presenting pilot Gordon Mounce with deputy badge

Photograph of Multnomah County Sheriff Thomas M. Hurlburt (left) presenting a deputy sheriff’s badge to pilot Gordon Mounce on April 25, 1928, when Mounce was sworn in as an aerial patrolman. They are standing next to a Continental Airways plane. The name “Mounce” and the number 18 are written on the negative and are visible in the image.

American Legion group posing with airplane in The Dalles

Full-length portrait of a group of people standing in front of a biplane in a field. Several are wearing American Legion garrison caps. The fourth person from left, wearing a dark jacket and holding a hat, is Charles H. Martin; the others are unidentified. Written on the negative is text that could be either “S. O. at The Dalles” or “S. A. at The Dalles.” See related image No. 372A1105.

David H. Smith and two unidentified men loading seaplane for Oregon Journal delivery

Photograph showing David H. Smith and two unidentified men loading copies of the Oregon Journal onto a Curtiss seaplane in June 1920. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on Page 6 of the Journal on Sunday, June 13, 1920. The photographs were published under the headline “Loading Journal Delivery Seaplane for Trial Trip.” This photograph had the following caption: “Scenes at landing basin of O. W. I. [Oregon, Washington, & Idaho] Airplane Company, where a fleet of Curtiss seaplanes will load afternoon editions of The Journal for delivery to Astoria and Seaside throughout the summer. Above―David H. Smith, circulation manager of The Journal, aiding in loading the big ship for its trial trip.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the beginning of Journal delivery by seaplane to Astoria and Seaside. See related image Nos. 373G0541 and 373G0542.

David H. Smith and two unidentified men loading seaplane for Oregon Journal delivery

Photograph showing Oregon Journal circulation manager David H. Smith and two unidentified men loading copies of the Journal onto a Curtiss seaplane in June 1920. The plane was being loaded for a trial run to Astoria and Seaside, where the Journal planned to deliver papers by seaplane throughout the summer of 1920. The Journal published a story about the new delivery service, headlined “Journal Arranges Airplane Delivery,” on the front page if its Sunday, June 13, 1920, edition. A similar photograph to this one, image No. 373G0540, was published on Page 6 of the June 13 edition. Also see additional related image No. 373G0542.

Three men next to airplane

Photograph of three men in aviator caps and goggles standing next to a Waco airplane, possibly one belonging to the Rankin School of Flying in Portland. The men are unidentified; the man on the right may be pilot Dick Rankin. Also see image No. 371N6013. This image may be related to image Nos. 371N6010 and 371N6011.

Twin-engine airplane

Photograph, taken from the front, of a twin-engine airplane on the ground at an airfield. A crowd of spectators is partially visible in the background. The number 8 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. See related images 371N6033 and 371N6037. Image note: Negative damage in upper right.

Shell Oil plane at airfield

Photograph, taken from the side, showing a monoplane on the ground at an airfield. The plane has the word “Shell” on the side and the number “NC128 W” on the tail. This could be one of the planes used to deliver fuel to the On-to-Oregon, a Stinson Detroiter monoplane flown by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin when they attempted to set an endurance flying record in August 1930. See image Nos. 371N6133 and 371N6199.

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