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O.B. Williams anniversary party

The Vancouver Baptist Church congregation celebrated the 30th anniversary of O.B. Williams as pastor in 1975. Williams formed the congregation in 1945 in Burton Homes, Washington, and facilitated its permanent move to Albina in Portland. He served as an important community and civil rights leader throughout his tenure as pastor.

First Baptist Church of Burton Homes

The Vancouver Avenue Baptist Church began as the First Baptist Church of Burton Homes, a federal wartime housing project managed by the Vancouver Housing Authority (Washington state). Most of the people in this 1945 photo of an early service were employees of the Kaiser Shipyards. The church moved to the Bagley Downs housing project later that year, then to Vanport City in 1946, and finally to the Albina neighborhood in Portland after Vanport was flooded in 1948. The current building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance to the history of civil rights in Oregon.

Lee Owen Stone papers, 1903-1977

  • Mss 2423
  • Collection
  • 1930 - 1977

Collection includes: Correspondence, sermons, awards and certificates, files from his activity in the Urban League of Portland and other civil and philanthropic associations, Minutes of meetings for Men's Club of St. Philip's Church, missionaries' quarterly reports, etc.

Stone, Lee Owen, 1903-1977

Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs photographs, 1953-1988.

  • Org. Lot 587
  • Collection
  • 1953 - 1988

Photographs and other materials that were assembled for the Northwest Black Heritage exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society, documenting the history and activities of the Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs and its constituent groups. The photographs depict the presidents of the Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs, including Katherine Gray, the association's first president; state and regional conventions; affiliated clubs; community service activities; winners of the association's Katherine Gray Memorial Scholarship; and federated girls' clubs associated with the organization. Also included is a photograph of the exhibit panel and photocopies of newspaper clippings and other materials used in the exhibit panel.

Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs

Charles Richard Stanton

First Lt. Charles Richard Stanton was the first black bomber pilot in the U.S. Armed Forces—he flew 81 combat missions in Europe during WWII. He was born in Maryland in 1920, but had moved with this family to Portland by the 1930s. He enlisted in 1942 into the Air Corps for the duration of the war, plus six months. He died in 1991, and is buried at the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

Female shipyard worker

An unidentified female employee of a shipyard in Portland during WWII takes a lunch break. Women were recruited into wartime industry jobs when men were sent overseas. Portland’s shipyards attracted thousands of women and African American workers looking for skilled, high-wage jobs.

Oregon Black History Project photographs collection, circa 1850-1960.

  • Org. Lot 679
  • Collection
  • 1850 - 1960

Photographs documenting African-​American history in Oregon, circa 1850-1960 that were collected during the Oregon Black History Project and some used to illustrate "A Peculiar Paradise: A History of Blacks in Oregon, 1788-1940," by Elizabeth McLagan. Subjects include portraits of African-​Americans in Portland and elsewhere in Oregon; residences of African-​Americans in Portland, including images of Vanport, Or. and the Vanport flood of 1948; African-​American clubs, social groups, sports, and other activities; and African-​American businesses in Portland, among other subjects. Some of the photographs are copies of images originally printed in newspapers such as the Portland Times and the Advocate.

George Singleton, Portland

Portrait of George Singleton. Singleton was an early resident of Portland, who at one time lived on the northwest corner of Alder Street and Sixth Ave. He likely held many professions, as most early settlers did, but he is listed in the 1882 City Directory as a "hackman" (driver) for Acker and Leahy, a city stables on Washington (Burnside) and Stark.

Prince Hall Masons

Members of the Prince Hall Masons, a fraternal organization for black men that formed as chapters in the Northwest in the 1880s and 1890s. The Prince Hall chapter in Portland was organized in 1891, and its Grand Lodge was located on NE Russell Street (now the Secret Society bar). The Prince Hall Masons are still active in Portland.

Wasson, J. L. (James Lonnie)

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