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Bethel AME Church

Unidentified members of the congregation standing in front of the east side of the Bethel AME (African Methodist Episcopal) Church. The Bethel AME Church once stood on the corner of N. Larrabee Ave. and N. McMillen Street. It was torn down in the 1950s when the city built the Memorial Coliseum.

Booker T. Washington

Half-length portrait of Booker T. Washington, seated and facing to the right. He is wearing a suit and bow tie. Written on the negative sleeve is the name “Washington, Booker T.”

Booker T. Washington

Half-length portrait of Booker T. Washington, seated and looking slightly left. He is wearing a suit and bow tie. Written on the negative sleeve is the name “Washington, Booker T.”

Boxers Barney Ross and Baby Joe Gans during match at Multnomah Stadium, Portland

Photograph of two boxers in the ring during a bout at Multnomah Civic Stadium in Portland on September 6, 1935. The boxer at left is Barney Ross; the boxer at right is Baby Joe Gans (also known as Gerald Slaughter). Ross won the match by knockout. Image note: The name “Barney Ross” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Boxers Barney Ross and Baby Joe Gans with others in ring at Multnomah Stadium, Portland

Photograph of two boxers standing in the ring, facing one another, at Multnomah Civic Stadium in Portland on September 6, 1935. They are surrounded by a small group of unidentified men. The boxer at left is Barney Ross; the boxer at right is Baby Joe Gans (also known as Gerald Slaughter). Ross won the match with Gans by knockout. Image note: The name “Barney Ross” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Cannady, Daniels, and Armentrout, Grant High School football players

Portrait of three football players in a row, posing with their hands on their knees.The players, all young men or teenage boys, are wearing sweatshirts, pads, football pants, and cleats. A building is partially visible in the background. On the negative, the name “Cannedy [sic]” is written next to the player on the left; the name “Daniels” is written above the player in the center; and the name “Armintrous [sic]” is written next to the player on the right.

Charles Long, boxer

Portrait of a man posing with his fists up. He is wearing a sweater under a sleeveless shirt, and his fists are wrapped. The text “Chas Long” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Charles Richard Stanton

First Lt. Charles Richard Stanton was the first black bomber pilot in the U.S. Armed Forces—he flew 81 combat missions in Europe during WWII. He was born in Maryland in 1920, but had moved with this family to Portland by the 1930s. He enlisted in 1942 into the Air Corps for the duration of the war, plus six months. He died in 1991, and is buried at the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

Drummer at his kit

Portrait of an unidentified drummer in a suit and tie, seated behind his drums. He is smiling and holding one drumstick in the air. Text that appears to be “A 2655” is written on the negative and is visible on the upper right side of the image.

Eddie Cartwright?, boxer

Portrait, taken from the side, of a man facing to the right and posing with his fists up. He is standing on what may be a rooftop or balcony and is wearing boxing gloves and shorts. The name “Cartright” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. The boxer’s name may be misspelled on the negative; he may be Eddie Cartwright. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Eddie Cartwright?, boxer

Close-up portrait of man with no shirt. The name “Cartright” is written on the negative and appears on the right side of the image. The boxer’s name may be misspelled on the negative; he may be Eddie Cartwright. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Eddie Cartwright?, boxer

Portrait, taken from the side, of a man facing to the right and posing with his fists up. He is standing on what may be a rooftop or balcony and is wearing boxing gloves, shorts, and shoes. The name “Cartright” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. The boxer’s name may be misspelled on the negative; he may be Eddie Cartwright. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Eddie Cartwright?, boxer

Portrait of a man posing with his fists up. He is standing on what may be a rooftop or balcony and is wearing boxing gloves, shoes, and shorts. The name “Cartright” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. The boxer’s name may be misspelled on the negative; he may be Eddie Cartwright. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Elmer C. Bartlett

Head and shoulders portrait of Elmer C. Bartlett facing front and wearing a suit jacket, collared shirt, tie, and glasses. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 5, Section 4 of the Oregon Journal's city edition on Sunday, August 16, 1931. The photograph had the following caption: "Elmer C. Bartlett who is here from Los Angeles to organize a large Negro choir that will be heard in concert the last part of September. The program will consist exclusively of Negro music." The photograph accompanied a story about Bartlett and the chorus that had the headline "Portland to Have Large Negro Chorus" and the subheading "Prominent Musician to Be Director." Note: The name “Bartlet” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Female shipyard worker

An unidentified female employee of a shipyard in Portland during WWII takes a lunch break. Women were recruited into wartime industry jobs when men were sent overseas. Portland’s shipyards attracted thousands of women and African American workers looking for skilled, high-wage jobs.

First Baptist Church of Burton Homes

The Vancouver Avenue Baptist Church began as the First Baptist Church of Burton Homes, a federal wartime housing project managed by the Vancouver Housing Authority (Washington state). Most of the people in this 1945 photo of an early service were employees of the Kaiser Shipyards. The church moved to the Bagley Downs housing project later that year, then to Vanport City in 1946, and finally to the Albina neighborhood in Portland after Vanport was flooded in 1948. The current building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance to the history of civil rights in Oregon.

Freeman's Second Hand Store

Edward Freeman? and his children standing in front of Freeman's Second-Hand Store. Edward Freeman ran a second-hand store on Union Avenue (now NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd) near what is now Fremont Park. He and his wife Ida moved with their son Theodore from Colorado in about 1915. They had two daughters in Portland, Ida and Gertrude.

George Singleton, Portland

Portrait of George Singleton. Singleton was an early resident of Portland, who at one time lived on the northwest corner of Alder Street and Sixth Ave. He likely held many professions, as most early settlers did, but he is listed in the 1882 City Directory as a "hackman" (driver) for Acker and Leahy, a city stables on Washington (Burnside) and Stark.

Harriet Redmond

Portrait of Mrs. Hattie Redmond taken from a newspaper clipping. Harriet "Hattie" Redmond (1862-1952) was a suffrage leader and a civil rights advocate in early twentieth-century Portland. She was the president of the Colored Women's Equal Suffrage Association and an active member of the Oregon Colored Women's Council.

Holman Crawford?, golfer

Portrait of a young man or teenage boy outdoors, posing with a golf club. He is looking to the left and is wearing a hat, collared shirt, tie, and knickers. His sweater has the letter “J” on the front. The number 2 and the name “Crofford” are written on the negative, but that name may be a misspelling; the golfer could be Holman Crawford. The name and the number 2 are visible on the right side of the photograph, next to another name that has been crossed out. Image note: Light leak on negative.

J. Hedspeth Restaurant

Two men in the J. Hedspeth Restaurant, on Flanders Street in 1912. The restaurant was owned by English G. Hedspeth. Hedspeth began as a waiter at the Portland Hotel.

Katherine Gray Club meeting

Members of the Katherine Gray Club pack canned food into a box during a meeting in 1956. Katherine Gray, along with Hattie Redmond, co-founded the Colored Women’s Equal Suffrage League and worked with Beatrice Cannady to protest the showing of “Birth of a Nation,” the racist 1915 film by D.W. Griffith. She was also the president of the Oregon Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, which created a club in her honor.

Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs

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