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Dixon family photographs

  • Org. Lot 1421
  • Collection
  • 1870-1945

Collection consists of six portraits of members of the Dixon family of Astoria, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, dated from approximately 1870 to 1945. Roscoe Dixon and his wife, Theresa Dixon, were early Black residents of Astoria. Roscoe Dixon owned Roscoe’s First Class Oyster Saloon in Astoria in the 1880s.

Dixon family

Northwest Power Planning Council Oral History Project

  • NWPPC
  • Collection
  • 1998-05-21 - 2004-05-26

This series of interviews was conducted by Michael O'Rourke and Jim Strassmaier as part of the Oregon Historical Society oral history program, beginning in 1998. The purpose of this oral history project was to document the history and purpose of the Northwest Power Planning Council, which is now known as the Northwest Power and Conservation Council.

The Northwest Power Planning Council is a four-state regional planning body formed by Congress through the Northwest Power Act of 1980 to develop and maintain regional conservation and electric power plans and a fish and wildlife program. The council is composed of two representatives from each member state: Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. The mission of the council is "to preserve the benefits of the Columbia River for future generations." The body was originally known as the Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council; the name was shortened to Northwest Power Planning Council in October 1981, and in 2003, the name was changed to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council.

Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.)

Oral history interview with Louis Bunce

  • SR 9323
  • Collection
  • 1977-06-01 - 1977-07-19

This oral history interview with Louis Bunce was conducted by Charles Digregorio from June 1 to July 19, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on June 1, 1978, Bunce discusses his education at the Museum Art School in Portland, Oregon, now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He talks about his experiences during the Depression and his involvement with the Works Progress Administration. He talks about his influences; describes his work in the Portland shipyards during World War II; and shares his artistic process. He talks about his involvement in the Portland Center for Visual Arts; discusses some of his art exhibitions; and talks about working on a commission for the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on July 19, 1978, Bunce reflects on his career as an artist. He talks about his art style and how it changed over the years. He revisits the topic of working on a commission for the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California. He also revisits the topics of his artistic process and art style. He closes the interview by talking about the art community in Portland.

Bunce, Louis, 1907-1983

Oral history interview with Kirby Ross

  • SR 18
  • Collection
  • 1979-12-20

This oral history interview with Kirby Ross was conducted by Charles Pavlovich on December 20, 1979. Ross' son, Kenneth Nelson Ross, and a person identified only as Mr. Johnson were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Ross discusses his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, including capturing enemy soldiers, retrieving bodies of fallen Allied soldiers, and fighting in the trenches. He also talks about where he was during the signing of the armistice. He then talks about his civilian life and serving in the Oregon National Guard before the start of World War I, including being deployed to disrupt efforts by the International Workers of the World to unionize agricultural workers. He then revisits the topic of his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, and describes at length his experiences on the front lines. He closes the interview by discussing where to donate the oral history interview and related materials.

Ross, Kirby S. (Kirby Stewart), 1893-1984

Oral history interview with John G. Wyers

  • SR 2097
  • Collection
  • 1959-03-03 - 1959-03-21

This oral history interview with John G. Wyers was conducted by his son, Teunis J. Wyers, from March 3-21, 1959. The interview was conducted in four sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during the first session.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 3, 1959, Wyers discusses settling in the Klickitat County, Washington, area in 1891. He talks about the people who lived in the areas now known as White Salmon and Underwood in the late 19th century. He describes a ferry, the landscape, and buildings in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 5, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived in the western area of Klickitat County in the late 19th century. He also speaks about conflicts between white emigrants and Native people who lived in the area.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 12, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived near the White Salmon River in the late 19th century, including the areas now known as Trout Lake and Glenwood.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 21, 1959, Wyers talks about the schools, churches, and roads in western Klickitat County in the late 19th century.

Wyers, John G. (John Gerbrand), 1871-1961

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse

  • SR 1713
  • Collection
  • 1991-01-15 - 1991-02-20

This oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse was conducted by Susan L. Smith in West Linn, Oregon, from January 15 to February 20, 1991. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford

  • SR 1500
  • Collection
  • 1987-11-28 - 1987-12-18

This oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford was conducted by Pat Bleakney at Crawford's home in The Dalles, Oregon, from November 28 to December 18, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during session 2 and contributed to the interview questions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 28, 1987, Crawford discusses the history of the Dalles, Oregon. He speaks at length about his family background of homesteading in The Dalles, as well as his early life there. He talks about his education in a one-room schoolhouse; discusses the people who lived in The Dalles during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and talks about his ranch. He also talks about railroad lines, roads, and fences in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 18, 1987, Crawford, Bleakney, and an unidentified woman drive and walk around The Dalles and talk about the history of the land, animals, roads, and buildings as they pass. They also walk along the Dalles Mountain Ranch Loop Hike and talk about the history of the area. Crawford then speaks about his life on a ranch in The Dalles. He also shares his memories of Celilo Falls before it was flooded by The Dalles Dam.

Crawford, Malcolm M. (Malcolm Moody), 1899-1992

Oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim

  • SR 1086
  • Collection
  • 1989-07-26 - 1989-09-13

This oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Heims' home in Portland, Oregon, from July 26 to September 13, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in five sessions. Adam C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 1 and 2; Clara C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 3 and 4; and both were interviewed together in session 5.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 26, 1989, Adam C. Heim discusses his family background, including his Russian and German heritage and his father's career with the Union Pacific Railroad Company. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, including his education and recreational activities. He speaks about working on a sugar beet farm in Idaho; about the Portland harbor; and about his apprenticeship as a machinist for the Union Pacific Railroad.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 2, 1989, Adam C. Heim talks about his siblings, particularly his older brother, John Adams Heim. He continues to discuss his career with the Union Pacific Railroad. He talks about his marriage to Clara C. Heim and about raising their children. He speaks about his experiences living in Huntington, Oregon, during the Depression, including the death of one of his children from spinal meningitis. He also discusses returning to Portland in the 1940s; talks about his children, their families, and their careers; and describes being injured during a robbery.

In the third interview session, conducted on August 29, 1989, Clara C. Heim discusses her family background and early life in North Portland. She talks about her siblings, their families, and their careers. She discusses her health as a child, her education, and working as a telephone operator.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 7, 1989, Clara C. Heim continues to discuss her early life in North Portland. She talks about her marriage to Adam C. Heim, about raising a family, and about her experiences during the Depression. She discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about life in Huntington, and about her political beliefs.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1989, Clara C. Heim and Adam C. Heim discuss living in and raising a family in Huntington and in North Portland during and after World War II. They also talk about the Black population in North Portland. They speak about their relationship with their children, about the changes in the Catholic Church, and about their political beliefs. They close the interview by talking about their recreational activities.

Heim, Adam C. (Adam Clarence), 1902-1995

Oral history interview with Sister John Mary Lane

  • SR 9012
  • Collection
  • 1978-04-17 - 1978-06-06

This oral history interview with Sister John Mary Lane was conducted by Roberta Watts at Marylhurst University in Marylhurst, Oregon, from April 17 to June 6, 1978. Norma Peters was also present. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 17, 1978, Lane discusses her family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, including her early influences and her education. She then talks about her involvement with the Sisters of the Holy Names and about why she chose to become a nun, and describes her spiritual philosophy. She discusses the ways in which the Catholic Church has become more progressive; describes life in a convent; and talks about the role of women in the church.

In the second interview session, conducted on June 6, 1978, Lane revisits the topic of her family background and early life in Spokane, Washington. She also revisits the topic of her involvement with the Sisters of the Holy Names and why she chose to become a nun. She talks about the reasons that fewer women were joining convents at the time of the interview in 1978. She then revisits the topic of life in a convent. She talks about her career as a professor, particularly at Marylhurst University, and discusses stereotypes about nuns. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Lane, John Mary, Sister, 1903-2000

Rick Sanders interviews with relatives

  • SR 2935
  • Collection
  • 1981-06-11 - 1998-03-24

Interviews with Ruth Wilcox, Leam Thomas, and Bradford Tompleman conducted by Rick Sanders from June 11, 1981, to March 24, 1998, as part of genealogical research by Sanders about his family.

The interview with Ruth Wilcox was conducted on June 11, 1981, at her home. The interview is approximately five minutes long. Wilcox was an aunt to Rick Sanders. She talks about her grandmother, who is identified as a member of the Sanders family. She speaks about her family background.

The interview with Leam Thomas was conducted on June 27, 1997. The interview is approximately eight minutes long. Thomas speaks about his family background, about his family real estate business, and about his career as a millworker in California. He also talks about his experiences in India during World War II.

The interview with Bradford Tompleman was conducted on March 25, 1998, in San Francisco, California. The interview is approximately 10 minutes long. Tompleman was a second cousin, once removed, of Rick Sanders. He speaks about his family background.

Sanders, Rick

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter

  • SR 9313
  • Collection
  • 1980-01-25

This oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Salem, Oregon, on January 25, 1980, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Potter discusses her education in art and architecture history at the University of Oregon and Penn State, and talks about some of her professors. She speaks about the origins of her interest in historic preservation, describes her training in public history, and talks about organizations related to historic preservation. She also talks about educational opportunities in public history in Oregon. She discusses her thesis on the topic of Methodist missionary architecture; talks about working as Oregon's first park historian; and speaks at length about her work with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Register of Historic Places. She describes the process of nominating places for the register and talks about the many sites that she added during her tenure as coordinator of the National Register for the State Historic Preservation Office. She speaks about local preservation ordinances in Oregon and other states. She closes the interview by talking about the future of the register.

Potter, Elisabeth Walton, 1939-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 9320
  • Collection
  • 1977-11-29

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Roberta Watts at the Oregonian Building in Portland, Oregon, on November 29, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his early life, education, and early jobs. He speaks about his career as an editorial cartoonist for the Oregonian newspaper; describes his artistic process; and reflects on some of the cartoons he drew. He closes the interview by talking about the training an editorial cartoonist should have.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with William H. Givler

  • SR 9325
  • Collection
  • 1978-05-17

This oral history interview with William H. Givler was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Givler's home in Portland, Oregon, on May 17, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Givler discusses his early life in Portland, including his early art education. He talks about studying art in New York. He then speaks about his career as a teacher and dean at the Museum Art School in Portland and talks about the development of the school. He discusses the future of the school. He also talks about his work in painting and printmaking, including his art style and artistic process. He closes the interview by discussing how he has changed as an artist.

Givler, William H., 1908-2000

Oral history interview with Frances L. Van Hevelingen

  • SR 9329
  • Collection
  • 1978-04-20

This oral history interview with Frances L. Van Hevelingen was conducted by Charles Digregorio on April 20, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Deborah Frosaker and Mary Prittchard were also present. In this interview, Van Hevelingen discusses her family history and early life on a rose farm in the Willamette Valley. She talks about her encaustic painting technique, her art style, and her artistic process. She also talks about weaving as an art form. She speaks about the art community in the United States.

Van Hevelingen, Frances L. (Frances Lovetta), 1915-2002

Cased photographs collection

  • Org. Lot 1414
  • Collection
  • 1840-2005

Collection consists of approximately 630 cased photographs, consisting primarily of daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and cased and uncased tintypes (also called ferrotypes) dating from approximately 1840-1900. Also represented in this collection are less common cased image formats, including photographs on milk glass (opalotypes), collodion positives on fabric (pannotypes), Orotypes (goldtypes), cased card photographs, and photo buttons.

The photographs are primarily studio portraits of people, both individuals and groups. The majority of the people depicted had some connection to Oregon or the American West, though the photographs themselves may have been taken elsewhere. The photographs also include depictions of early Oregon street and residential scenes. The identities of the depicted individuals, photographers, and studios are documented in the condition reports for materials in this collection when known.

The collection also includes records and condition reports about many, but not all, of the photographs. These documents provide details about people or places depicted in the images; material types; condition of the images; any conservation care performed; and any known provenance. Condition reports are also included for images in a separate collection, Org. Lot 2, the William Lair Hill family photographs collection, also held at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library.

Oral history interview with Vera Prasilova Scott

  • SR 1450
  • Collection
  • 1990-04-07

This oral history interview with Vera Prasilova Scott was conducted by Shirley Tanzer at Scott's home in Portland, Oregon, on April 7, 1990. In this interview, Scott discusses her family background and early life in Churdim, now known as Vyoske Myto, Czech Republic, and speaks at length about her education. She then talks about studying photography with Frantisek Dritkol in Prague and at the Graphic Arts School of Munich in Germany just after the end of World War I. She also talks about meeting Arthur F. Scott in Munich, describes inflation in Germany in 1922 and 1923, and talks about her experiences in New York City the next year, including meeting Arthur F. Scott again. She speaks about her marriage to Scott. She talks about living in Houston, Texas, about running a photography studio, and about her friendship with the family of Robert Autrey. She discusses studying drawing and sculpture at Portland State University and closes the interview by talking about her parents' deaths and the arrival of her sister, Nadja Munk, in the United States just before the outbreak of World War II.

Scott, Vera Prasilova, 1899-1996

Oral history interview with Helen M. Brunner

  • SR 1302
  • Collection
  • 1989-01-21 - 1989-01-21

This oral history interview with Helen M. Brunner was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on January 21, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Brunner discusses her family background and talks about coming to Eugene, Oregon, in 1920. She talks about her education and studying to become an accountant at Eugene Business College. She discusses her early accounting jobs and experiences during the Depression. She then speaks about working as an accountant for Fred Meyer Inc. from 1940 to 1946. She talks about working with Herbert Retzlaff, shares her opinion on labor unions, and describes a typical work day. She speaks about the operations for Fred Meyer Inc., about the employee compensation, and about the Meyer family from the perspective of an employee. She closes the interview by discussing living in Portland during World War II.

Brunner, Helen M. (Helen Marie), 1905-2007

Oral history interview with Richard E. Groener

  • SR 1103
  • Collection
  • 1988-09-13 - 1989-03-25

This oral history interview with Richard Groener was conducted by Richard McConnell from September 13, 1988, to March 25, 1989. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 13, 1988, Groener discusses his early life in Oregon City, Oregon, including his experiences during the Depression. He speaks at length about working in Alaska in a cannery and mining gold. He talks about his experiences in the Merchant Marines during World War II, including spending time in China. He then talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party and why he first ran for elected office. He discusses his service in the Oregon House of Representatives and in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1982, including his political campaigns and his two primary defeats. He describes the garden-party style of fundraisers he often held, talks about his association with Wayne Morse, and shares his opinions of the Oregon governors who held office while he was in the Legislature.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 25, 1989, Groener briefly discusses a trip he took to Taiwan and revisits the topic of spending time in China during World War II. He speaks about labor legislation that came up during his time in the Legislature, about working with lobbyists, and about his relationship with the press. He discusses legislation he worked on, and closes the interview by talking about some of the people he served with.

Groener, Richard, 1917-

Oral history interview with David Irving

  • SR 1084
  • Collection
  • 1992-02-05

This oral history interview with David Irving was conducted by Mark Flint on February 5, 1992. In this interview, Irving discusses working with Glenn Jackson at Pacific Power and Light Company, and speaks at length about Jackson's personality and accomplishments. He also talks about Glenn Jackson and Helen Jackson's marriage and Jackson's involvement in politics.

Irving, David

Oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder

  • SR 1078
  • Collection
  • 1975-03

This oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder was conducted in four sessions by Herman LeRoy Grafe in March 1975. Willis Raymond Grafe and Lois Lennox were also present and contributed to the interview. The audio of the first two interview sessions is very poor; there is bleed-through of choral music and the speakers' voices echo. The tapes also contain several minutes of unrelated audio content.

In the first interview session, Lois Lennox discusses her family background.

In the second interview session, Herbert Schroeder discusses his family background, including homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging. He also talks about mining operations.

In the third interview session, Schroeder, Willis Raymond Grafe, and Herman LeRoy Grafe speak about family matters. They also revisit the topics of homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging.

In the fourth interview session, Schroeder and Herman LeRoy Grafe have a casual conversation. Television is played loudly in the background.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Herbert Alfred), 1887-1984

Oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider

  • SR 1075
  • Collection
  • 1985-04-18 - 1985-04-25

This oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Schneiders' home in Portland, Oregon, from April 18-25, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 18, 1985, the Schneider brothers discuss their family history and early life in Portland. They speak at length about their first family home in Southeast Portland and they describe the appliances and utilities the house had in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They then describe the family home that they moved to in 1910. They also talk about the jobs they held, their education, and their recreational activities. They share their memories of Oaks Amusement Park, of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, and of the early Portland Rose Festival parades.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 25, 1985, the Schneider brothers continue to discuss their early life in Portland, including their recreational activities, their involvement with the Catholic Church, and their education. They also talk about their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company. They then discuss their experiences serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Nicholas Schneider also talks about experiencing anti-German and anti-Catholic discrimination. They close the interview by revisiting the topic of their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company.

Schneider, Nicholas, 1892-1989

Oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti

  • SR 1074
  • Collection
  • 1987-03-26 - 1987-04-30

This oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, from March 26 to April 30, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 26, 1987, Petti discusses her family background and early life in Vernonia, Oregon, including her family's history in the hotel business, her education, and her experience during the Depression. She talks about living and working in Portland during the Depression and describes how she came to work for Henry Thiele. She discusses her relationship with and marriage to Henry Thiele. She also talks about participating in illegal gambling and going to speakeasies in the 1930s.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 2, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her early life in Vernonia, including her family's history in the hotel business and taking piano lessons. She then continues discussing her marriage to Henry Thiele, and speaks at length about Thiele's life and career. She talks about managing the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, about serving alcohol after 1952, and about catering for the Kaiser shipyards during World War II. She discusses the menu at the Henry Thiele Restaurant, and talks about working with food suppliers. She then looks at photographs and talks about them.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 9, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her marriage to Henry Thiele and talks about their home in Lake Oswego. She talks about Henry Thiele's involvement with Christian Science. She also revisits the topic of managing Henry Thiele Restaurant, and discusses serving alcohol, talks about managing her staff, and shares the history of the restaurant. She shares her opinions on national politics. She describes a failed deal to sell the restaurant in 1986.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 30, 1987, Petti continues to discuss managing Henry Thiele Restaurant and talks about the restaurant's clientele. She also talks about her social life at the time of the interview in 1987. She then discusses her marriage to August Petti. She talks about her plans for the future and about traveling with August Petti. The interview closes with Petti looking at photographs and talking about them.

Petti, Margaret Thiele, 1916-2001

Oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow

  • SR 1071
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-22 - 1985-09-26

This oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow was conducted by Bill Koen at Furrow's home near Odell, Oregon, from August 22 to September 26, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 22, 1985, Furrow discusses her family background, particularly regarding her grandfather, Peter Mohr, who owned the first commercial orchard in Hood River, Oregon. She describes daily life on the family orchard and dairy farm in Hood River. She talks about working as a fruit packer for Nakamura Orchards.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 26, 1985, Furrow shares her observations of the treatment of the Japanese community in Hood River during World War II, and describes racial discrimination in Hood River. She revisits the topic of daily life on her family's orchard and dairy farm in Hood River, and talks about the gendered division of labor. She describes her work picking and packing fruit for Nakamura Orchards. She talks about the ranch she ran with her husband, William Henry Furrow, and discusses selling their fruit through Diamond Fruit Growers Inc. She discusses the future of small farms in Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her involvement in the Hood River County Historical Society.

Furrow, Margaret L. (Margaret Lucille), 1913-2001

Oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton

  • SR 1076
  • Collection
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

This oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton was conducted by Nancy Hawver from September 10 to December 13, 1991, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 10, 1991, Thornton discusses her family background and early life in Tillamook, Oregon, including her parents' involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association. She talks about her early education, her recreational activities, and her early interest in art. She discusses a trip she took to Europe in 1935. She talks about her experiences in high school and at the University of Oregon. She also revisits the topics of the Tillamook Creamery Association and her early life in Tillamook. She discusses her marriage to Robert Y. Thornton and talks about his legal and political career.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 17, 1991, Thornton discusses her experience during World War II and talks about working in the blimp factory in Tillamook. She also talks about Robert Y. Thornton's service in the U.S. Army during the war. She discusses Robert Y. Thornton's study of Japanese and her own study of art. She then discusses living in Tillamook at the end of the war, talks about her involvement in the Tillamook Library Board, and about raising her son, Thomas Wells Thornton.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 22, 1991, Thornton discusses living in Salem after Robert Y. Thornton was elected to the Oregon State Legislature in 1950 and talks about her experiences as a wife of a politician, her involvement with the Bush House Auxiliary, and her interest in art and photography. She also talks about cases Robert Y. Thornton worked on as state attorney general.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on December 13, 1991, Thornton continues to discuss living in Salem, including her involvement in early childhood education. She also continues to discuss Robert Y. Thornton's career as state attorney general. She talks about her involvement in the Arts in Oregon Council and other arts organizations; describes her cornea transplant surgery; and discusses taking art classes. She talks about a trip she took to Japan in the late 1950s, about attending attorneys general conventions, and about the establishment of the Grove of the States in 1967. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with the Portland Art Museum and other arts organizations.

Thornton, Dorothy H. (Dorothy Haberlach), 1913-2005

Portland Jobs with Justice records

  • Coll 827
  • Collection
  • 1988 - 2019

Collection consists of the records of the Portland, Oregon coalition of Jobs with Justice, a national non-profit organization advocating for workers' rights. The records document several campaigns and other activities of the Portland branch from the tenure of its first executive director, Margaret Butler, from its founding in 1991 through 2016, and cover labor issues and actions primarily in the Pacific Northwest but also across the nation and the world.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Oral history interview with Don E. Clark

  • SR 1166
  • Collection
  • 1994-08-30 - 1998-03-27

This oral history interview with Don E. Clark was conducted by George M. Joseph at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from August 30, 1994 to March 27, 1998. The interview was conducted over twenty-nine sessions, and the collection includes a transcript. Tape 13 of this interview is missing, and some sections of the interview have been restricted by Clark.

In sessions 1 through 5, Clark discusses his early life and career, including working as a prison guard at San Quentin State Prison in California and then as a deputy for the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office. In sessions 5 and 6, he discusses his 1962 campaign for Multnomah County sheriff. In sessions 7 through 9, he continues to speak about his campaign, and then discusses serving as Multnomah County sheriff from 1962 to 1966. In sessions 10 and 11, he discusses his 1966 re-election campaign for Multnomah County sheriff and his simultaneous campaign for chair of the Multnomah County board of commissioners; serving as assistant director of the Law Enforcement Program at Portland State University from 1967 to 1968, and his 1968 campaign for position 4 on the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners. In sessions 12 through 15, Clark talks about serving on the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners, focusing on the years from 1969 to 1974. In sessions 16 through 20, he talks about campaigning for and serving as chair of the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners from 1975 to 1979. In sessions 21 through 24, Clark discusses serving as county executive from 1979 to 1982, and his 1982 campaign for Oregon governor. In sessions 25 through 29, Clark talks about his activities since leaving office, including serving as executive director of the Burnside Consortium, now known as Central City Concern, from 1984 to 1988, and as executive director of the Housing Authority of Portland, now known as Home Forward, from 1988 to 1992.

Clark, Don E. (Donald Edward), 1933-

Oral history interview with Amo R. DeBernardis

  • SR 2079
  • Collection
  • 1993-04-09 - 1993-11-05

This oral history interview with Amo R. DeBernardis was conducted by Corbett S. Gottfried from April 9 to November 5, 1993. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 9, 1993, DeBernardis discusses his family background and early life in the Portland, Oregon, area, including jobs he did during his childhood. He speaks at length about his early education and his teachers. He talks about his experience studying engineering at Oregon State University, including his classes, teachers, and how he decided to become a teacher. He also discusses his involvement in designing the Bonneville Dam while in college. He then talks about working as a shop teacher at Ockley Green Elementary School in Portland and working with students. He speaks briefly about his master's thesis, then talks about switching to becoming an education administrator and shares his philosophy on what makes a good administrator. He talks about his wife, Jessie Genevieve Hulery, and their children. He describes his service training officers in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 16, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II and talks about the changes in education after the war. He describes working with Portland Public Schools in the late 1940s and 1950s; talks about his main accomplishments; and describes his educational philosophy. He then speaks about the beginnings of adult education in Oregon and about serving as Portland Community College's first president from 1961 to 1979. He describes the various programs PCC offered, the development of its campuses, and the opposition the fledgling college faced. He talks about the relationship between PCC and Portland Public Schools, other community colleges in the Portland Metro area, and about the Oregon State Department of Education. He discusses tuition rates and the value of the classes that PCC offers.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 23, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He continues talking about the development of PCC's campuses and the value of the classes that PCC offers. He speaks about the business model of higher education, the formation of the community college district, and the teachers union. He talks about members of the PCC board during his presidency, teachers they hired, and his management style. He discusses PCC's curriculum and how it compared to a traditional four-year college and talks about the accreditation process.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on May 24, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He talks about meeting the academic and personal needs of the students during the 1960s and 1970s. He describes the student services that PCC provided; talks about the value of vocational education programs; and shares his opinion on college athletic programs. He discusses the job placement programs at PCC, the role of the Oregon and federal departments of education, and the Oregon Community College Association. He also talks about the role of the Oregon Legislature in the development of PCC. He describes the mission of Portland Community College.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on June 10, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He continues describing the mission of Portland Community College and revisits the topics of PCC's hiring practices and his major accomplishments during his presidency. He also discusses his failures and conflicts. He talks about his relationships with presidents at other community colleges in Oregon, budgeting concerns for a college, and PCC's relationship with Oregon 4-year colleges. He then speaks about his retirement activities and reflects on the challenges of leading a college. He also shares his philosophy on life.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 5, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He speaks at length about the early development of PCC. He discusses how PCC differs from a traditional junior college, talks about the growth of the college, and describes the development of the student transfer program. He talks about hiring and firing teachers, his role as president of the college, and the decision-making process. He reflects on some of the decisions he was responsible for as president. He revisits the topic of his leadership philosophy and discusses the organizational structure of PCC.

DeBernardis, Amo R. (Amo Richard), 1913-2010

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting

  • SR 1092
  • Collection
  • 2019-07-01 - 2019-12-02

This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

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