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Young man next to foliage

Portrait from the knees up of a man in a suit. He stands in front of a backdrop, with grassy foliage to his right. Under the photograph is a caption reading “Guess who it is?” The man individual is likely seen in PGE136-3 at an older age (O.B. Coldwell). Also written on the photograph is “Watson, 225 First Street, Portland Ore.”

Wrecking building and cars

Photograph showing a wrecked building with street cars in the debris. Several men stand on top of one of the cars while looking at the camera. A large pile of building debris surrounds the cars, and other buildings can be seen in the background. The photograph is a reproduction of a printed image.

Work train #927

Photograph showing work train #927 in front of a two-story wooden building. On the left side of the image, a brick drugstore can be seen. What appears to be a rope and pulley system are visible on the train car.

Woman getting on twin train

Photograph showing a women getting on a twin car train. The woman is wearing a hat with a veil and a striped dress. To either side of the woman, two other attached cars are separated by safety gates. (Image note: top left corner of glass negative is broken).

William Howard Taft with group outside Multnomah Hotel, Portland

Full-length portrait of William Howard Taft (fifth from left) with a group of men outside the Multnomah Hotel in Portland on Sunday, August 22, 1915. Standing nearest to Taft are members of the reception committee that greeted him when he arrived in Portland. To the left of Taft, in a hat, is Charles H. Carey, president of the Oregon Bar Association. To the right of Taft are Judge George N. Davis and J. N. Teal (wearing glasses and holding coat and umbrella. The other men in the photograph are unidentified. According to two front-page stories in the Oregon Journal on Monday, August 23, 1915, Taft spoke at a Portland Press Club luncheon and the first joint convention of the Oregon and Washington bar associations. He departed on the afternoon of Monday, August 23. See related image Nos. 373G0202, and 373G0203. Image note: The numbers 538 and 16 are written on the negative and are visible at the top of the image.

William Howard Taft walking with reception committee after arriving in Portland

Photograph showing William Howard Taft (front right) walking with members of the reception committee that greeted him upon his arrival in Portland on Sunday, August 22, 1915. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, August 23, 1915. The photograph had the following caption: “Ex-President Taft, on his arrival in Portland yesterday, and reception committee representing Oregon Bar Association. From the depot the ex-president was conducted to the Multnomah hotel, where a committee from the Portland Press Club was waiting to bear him and the Bar Association committee off to a newspaper men’s luncheon. In the picture, from left to right, are: Charles H. Carey, president Oregon Bar Association; J. N. Teal, Judge George N. Davis, and Mr. Taft.” During his visit, Taft spoke at the press club luncheon and the first joint convention of the Oregon and Washington bar associations, according to two front-page stories that accompanied the photograph. Taft departed on the afternoon of Monday, August 23. See related image Nos. 373G0201 and 373G0203. Image note: The number 15 is written on the negative and circled; it is visible in the upper left corner of the photograph. The number 539 was written on the negative and crossed out. Light leak on negative.

William Howard Taft outside Multnomah Hotel, Portland

Head and shoulders portrait of William Howard Taft outside the Multnomah Hotel in Portland on Sunday, August 22, 1915. He is smiling and facing to the left. During his visit, Taft spoke at at a Portland Press Club luncheon and the first joint convention of the Oregon and Washington bar associations, according to two front-page stories in the Oregon Journal on Monday, August 23, 1915. Taft departed on the afternoon of August 23. See related image Nos. 373G0201 and 373G0202. Image note: The number 14 is written on the negative. The number 540 was written on the negative and crossed out. The writing is visible in the upper right corner of the image.

William Gibbs McAdoo speaking at cornerstone ceremony in Portland

Photograph, taken on Wednesday, October 10, 1917, showing United States treasury secretary William Gibbs McAdoo speaking on a flag-draped platform in Portland during a ceremony to lay the cornerstone for a new post office at Park and Glisan (now NW Park Avenue and NW Glisan Street). A cropped and reversed version of this image was one of two photographs of McAdoo’s address that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day. The two photographs were published beneath the following caption: “William Gibbs McAdoo, secretary of the treasury, addressing throng in the North Park blocks this morning in celebration of laying cornerstone for new Portland postoffice. The event opened the busy day for the head of the nation’s financial affairs in urging renewed vigor for Liberty Loan. Picture at right [referring to this image] shows Secretary McAdoo “close up” in characteristic speaking pose.” The photographs accompanied three stories about McAdoo’s visit: One headlined “Says We’ll Make Kaiser Bill Look Like 30 Cents”; one headlined “Sec. M’Adoo Speaks to Crowd at Laying of the Cornerstone”; and one headlined “Secretary M’Adoo Comes Here to Urge Liberty Bond Sales.”

Willam Gibbs McAdoo in Portland during presidential campaign trip

Head and shoulders photograph showing William Gibbs McAdoo looking to the left and smiling. The photograph was taken on Sunday, April 20, 1924, when McAdoo, who was campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination, stopped briefly in Portland on his way to speak in California. See related image No. 373G0126. Image note: The name “McAdoo” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the photograph. Light leak on negative.

Willam Gibbs McAdoo in Portland during presidential campaign trip

Head and shoulders photograph showing William Gibbs McAdoo facing front and smiling. The photograph was taken on Sunday, April 20, 1924, when McAdoo, who was campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination, stopped briefly in Portland on his way to speak in California. See related image No. 373G0120. Image note: The name “McAdoo” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the image.

Warford

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and looking to the right. He is smiling and is wearing a hat, a suit jacket and vest, a collared shirt, and a tie. He may be standing outside Portland City Hall. The name “Warford, Mr” is written on the negative sleeve. See related image No. 373G0213.

W. J. Babe, deputy vice president, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen

Head and shoulders portrait of W. J. Babe, deputy vice president of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, standing outside the Imperial Hotel in Portland. He is facing to the right and is wearing a hat and suit. The photograph was taken on Saturday, April 10, 1920, when Babe was in Portland to assist in resolving a strike by railway switchmen. The Journal published a different photo of Babe, image No. 376G0375, and coverage the strike on the front page of the April 10 city edition. See additional related image No. 376G0376. Image note: The text “W. J. Babe” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the image.

W. J. Babe and F. D. Hobbs, railroad union officials, outside Imperial Hotel, Portland

Full-length portrait of two men, both wearing suits, hats, and ties, standing on the sidewalk outside the Imperial Hotel in Portland on Saturday, April 10, 1920. That day, a nearly identical photograph, image No. 376G0376, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition under the headline “Union Officials Here to Combat Strike.” The photograph had the following caption: “Two prominent officials of the trainmen’s organizations, who are in Portland doing their best to bring about a speedy settlement of the ‘rebel’ strike which has broken out among the switchmen. They are: Left, W. J. Babe, national deputy vice president of the Brotherhood of Railway [sic] Trainmen, and right, F. D. Hobbs, general chairman of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen of the O-W. R & N. [Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company] system, photographed by The Journal staff photographer today at their headquarters in the Imperial hotel.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Brotherhood Official Says Use Lever Act To Defeat Radicals.” The story was one of four front-page articles about the strike, which was occurring in cities around the United States. See additional related image No. 376G0374. Image note: On the negative, the name “W. J. Babe” is written above the man at left, and the name “Hobb [sic]” is written above the man at right.

W. J. Babe and F. D. Hobbs, railroad union officials, outside Imperial Hotel, Portland

Full-length portrait of two men, both wearing suits, hats, and ties, standing on the sidewalk outside the Imperial Hotel in Portland on Saturday, April 10, 1920. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition under the headline “Union Officials Here to Combat Strike.” The photograph had the following caption: “Two prominent officials of the trainmen’s organizations, who are in Portland doing their best to bring about a speedy settlement of the ‘rebel’ strike which has broken out among the switchmen. They are: Left, W. J. Babe, national deputy vice president of the Brotherhood of Railway [sic] Trainmen, and right, F. D. Hobbs, general chairman of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen of the O-W. R & N. [Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company] system, photographed by The Journal staff photographer today at their headquarters in the Imperial hotel.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Brotherhood Official Says Use Lever Act To Defeat Radicals.” The story was one of four front-page articles about the strike, which was occurring in cities around the United States. See related image Nos. 376G0374 and 376G0374. Image note: On the negative, the name “W. J. Babe” is written above the man at left, and the name “Hobb [sic]” is written above the man at right.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow carrying an unidentified person down a ladder on his back during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. A group of people are watching at right. On Page 12 of the Sunday, February 22, 1922 edition, the Oregon Journal published a story and four related photographs about a series of lecture demonstrations given by Longfellow in Portland. The story reported that Longfellow was a first-aid expert for the American Red Cross. He would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, the story reported, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0369, 373G0370, 373G0371, and 373G0372.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow carrying an unidentified man on his back during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. The two men are back to back, with a coat serving as a makeshift sling. Longfellow is wearing the top of the coat backward over his head like a hood, and the man being carried has his arms through the coat’s sleeves. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, February 22, 1920, under the headline “Illustrates Rescue Holds.” The photographs collectively had the single caption: “Novel ‘holds’ demonstrated Saturday by W. E. Longfellow, first aid expert for the American Red Cross, who is here to instruct Portland folk in life saving methods.” A story accompanying the photographs reported that Longfellow would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0368, 373G0369, 373G0371, and 373G0372.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow carrying an unidentified man down a ladder on his back during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. The two men are back to back, with a blanket serving as a makeshift sling. The blanket is wrapped around the person being carried and is tied under his arms. A group of people in uniform are standing next to the ladder, watching. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, February 22, 1920, under the headline “Illustrates Rescue Holds.” The photographs collectively had the single caption: “Novel ‘holds’ demonstrated Saturday by W. E. Longfellow, first aid expert for the American Red Cross, who is here to instruct Portland folk in life saving methods.” A story accompanying the photographs reported that Longfellow would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0368, 373G0369, 373G0370, and 373G0372.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow observing as an unidentified man carries a person on his back demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. At right, a group of people are watching. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, February 22, 1920, under the headline “Illustrates Rescue Holds.” The photographs collectively had the single caption: “Novel ‘holds’ demonstrated Saturday by W. E. Longfellow, first aid expert for the American Red Cross, who is here to instruct Portland folk in life saving methods.” A story accompanying the photographs reported that Longfellow would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0368, 373G0369, 373G0370, and 373G0371. Image note: Negative damage at top center.

W. E. Longfellow demonstrating rescue technique

Photograph showing W. E. Longfellow crouched over an unidentified lying on the sidewalk during a demonstration of life-saving techniques in February 1920. Longfellow is pressing on the prone man’s back with both hands. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four published on Page 12 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, February 22, 1920, under the headline “Illustrates Rescue Holds.” The photographs collectively had the single caption: “Novel ‘holds’ demonstrated Saturday by W. E. Longfellow, first aid expert for the American Red Cross, who is here to instruct Portland folk in life saving methods.” A story accompanying the photographs reported that Longfellow would remain in Portland until Saturday, February 28, “instructing school children, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members, firemen and others the art of lifesaving by old, new and thoroughly approved methods.” See related image Nos. 373G0368, 373G0370, 373G0371, and 373G0372.

Vogler Boy III and Oregon Wolf IV racing in Portland Rose Festival regatta

Photograph showing two unidentified men racing a speedboat named Vogler Boy III on the Willamette River in Portland. In the background are a second boat and a bridge, probably the 1905 Morrison Bridge or the 1894 Burnside Bridge. A similar photograph, image No. 376G0160, was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 14, 1917, under the headline “Spectacular Speed Boat Race of Annual Rose Festival Regatta.” That photograph had the following caption: “Vogler Boy III, Pacific Coast speed boat champion, leading the Oregon Wolf IV in the free-for-all race of the Rose Festival regatta.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Vogler Boy III Wins Free-For-All Event Of Carnival Regatta” and the subheading “Vogler’s Champion Defeats Oregon Wolf IV by Margin of One Second.”

Vogler Boy III and Oregon Wolf IV racing in Portland Rose Festival regatta

Photograph showing two unidentified men racing a speedboat named Vogler Boy III on the Willamette River in Portland. In the background are a second boat and a bridge, probably the 1905 Morrison Bridge or the 1894 Burnside Bridge. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 14, 1917, under the headline “Spectacular Speed Boat Race of Annual Rose Festival Regatta.” The photograph had the following caption: “Vogler Boy III, Pacific Coast speed boat champion, leading the Oregon Wolf IV in the free-for-all race of the Rose Festival regatta.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Vogler Boy III Wins Free-For-All Event Of Carnival Regatta” and the subheading “Vogler's Champion Defeats Oregon Wolf IV by Margin of One Second.” See related image No. 376G0161.

Vice President Calvin Coolidge speaking at groundbreaking ceremony, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, August 15, 1922, showing Vice President Calvin Coolidge speaking at a groundbreaking ceremony for the Theodore Roosevelt statue in Portland’s south park blocks. Coolidge is standing on a platform under a striped awning and is gesturing with both hands. He later performed the groundbreaking. See related image Nos. 373G0031, 373G0032, 373G0035, 373G0036, 373G0037, and 379G0023.

Vice President Calvin Coolidge speaking at groundbreaking ceremony, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, August 15, 1922, showing Vice President Calvin Coolidge speaking at a groundbreaking ceremony for the Theodore Roosevelt statue in Portland’s south park blocks. Coolidge is standing on a platform under a striped awning and is gesturing with his arms outstretched. He later performed the groundbreaking. See related image Nos. See related image Nos. 373G0031, 373G0032, 373G0035, 373G0036, 373G0037, and 379G0023.

Vice President Calvin Coolidge breaking ground for Roosevelt statue, Portland

Photograph showing Vice President Calvin Coolidge turning the first shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for the Theodore Roosevelt statue in Portland’s south park blocks on Tuesday, August 15, 1922. A crowd is watching in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four, including image Nos. 373G0032 and 379G0023, that was published on Page 7 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Wednesday, August 13, 1922. The photographs were published under the headline “When The First Earth Was Turned.” This photograph had the following caption: “The vice president caught in the act.” See additional related image Nos. 373G0031, 373G0034, 373G0035, and 373G0036.

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