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William L. Finley photographs, 1901-1940

  • Org. Lot 369
  • Collection
  • 1901 - 1940

Images of wildlife, primarily birds of the western United States, c.1900-1940s, photographed by William Lovell Finley and his associate Herman T. Bohlman, with the help of his wife, Nellie Irene Barnhart Finley and others. The collection includes fine images of adult and immature birds, chicks, eggs, and nests. Many show habitat. Others document the camera equipment and techniques used to make the photographs.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Collection
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

William L. Finley letters and scrapbook, 1946-1962

  • Mss 2654
  • Collection
  • 1946 - 1962

Collection includes: Scrapbook and letters, 1 vol. and 1 folder, 1946-1962, regarding personal matters, the Izaak Walton League, conservation, etc.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Monteith family photograph collection, 1847-1854

  • Org. Lot 1388
  • Collection
  • 1847 - 1854

This collection is comprised of two (2) daguerreotypes showing portraits of brothers Thomas and Walter Monteith, who founded the town of Albany, Oregon, circa 1849. They traveled to Oregon from New York in 1847 and settled adjacent land claims, sharing a house which straddled the two claims.

Photographs of Vanport, Oregon, circa 1948

  • Org. Lot 1364
  • Collection
  • 1942 - 1948

Photographs of Vanport, Oregon before and after the flood of 1948, including images of Dale Skovgaard and his family, who lived there at the time.

Skovgaard, Dale

Vanport flood photographs collection, 1948

  • Org. Lot 131
  • Collection
  • 1948

Photographs of the aftermath of the flood that destroyed Vanport, Or. on May 30, 1948. The images depict the damage to buildings, bridges, roadways, and other structures in both Vanport and Portland, Or. Includes postcards and snapshots, as well as photographs taken by the Camera Art Studio of Portland, Or.

Camera Art Studio (Portland, Or.)

Stella Maris House collection, 1940-1973; bulk : 1960-1972

  • Mss 1585
  • Collection
  • 1940 - 1973

Ranging in date from 1940 to 1973, the Stella Maris House Collection consists of printed material, correspondence, and administrative, financial, and legal records created and collected by the Portland, Oregon-based social justice group during the course of their work. The collection demonstrates the local evolution of social issues key to the history of the United States during the 1960s. Over a third of the archive's content is dedicated to Oregon's migrant labor rights movement, and it also features records documenting the area's civil rights movement, urban renewal projects, interstate highway infrastructure, and social welfare programs initiated by the Economic Opportunity Act.

The bulk of the collection consists of printed material created by a number of local and national organizations between 1960 and 1972, then collected by the Stella Maris House. This portion of the archive includes programs, reports, studies, surveys, correspondence, brochures, and flyers generated by civil rights, migrant rights, and peace movement groups. Items of note include the Albina Neighborhood Improvement Project's plans for urban redevelopment (Series B), an African-American employment survey conducted by the Metropolitan Interfaith Commission on Race (Series E), and records documenting the Housing Authority of Portland (Series I). The collection also features printed material created by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Series E), the Valley Migrant League (Series J), and the United Farm Workers (Series J). Newspaper clippings that document events important to social justice movements constitute a substantial part of the collection.

A small but significant portion of the collection was created by the staff members of the Stella Maris House; it includes notes by the staff documenting the meetings of local groups. These meeting notes often provide remarkably candid insights into the workings of area groups. Additionally, Stella Maris House staff members also contributed group and program histories to the collection.

Stella Maris House (Portland, Or.)

Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series

  • SR Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series
  • Collection
  • 1981?

A series of lectures given by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on the importance of preserving the Columbia River Gorge.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-1986

The Bo's'n's Whistle

  • BW-OSC
  • Collection
  • 1941 - 1946

The Bo's'n's Whistle was a publication distributed to the employees of the Kaiser Shipyards in Oregon and Washington between 1941 and 1946. The first publication was released on July 18, 1941 under the editorial direction of Chick Johnson, and was given its distinctive name by Edgar Kaiser the General Manager of the shipyard. Subsequent issues released bi-weekly, along with a special issue on September 27, 1941 commemorating the launch of the "Star of Oregon". Distribution expanded to the Vancouver and Swan Island Shipyards in April 1942, with Hal Babbit, director of public relations for Kaiser Company serving as editorial supervisor.

The format of the Bo's'n's Whistle changed from a magazine to a weekly newspaper beginning March 10, 1944, with separate editions for each of the three shipyards - Oregon Shipyard, Swan Island, and Vancouver. On September 7, 1945 The Bo's'n's Whistle was again consolidated into one edition for all three shipyards, and on January 1, 1946 it was moved to a twice-monthly publication schedule. The final issue of The Bo's'n's Whistle was published on May 24, 1946. At its peak, The Bo's'n's Whistle was circulated to 90,000 employees, with over 4,000,000 copies distributed over its lifespan.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

Oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon

  • SR 1
  • Collection
  • 1983-03-16

This oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon was conducted by Elizabeth Buehler at the Harmon home in Beavercreek, Oregon, on March 16, 1983. In this interview, the Harmons discuss their experience of graduating from Iowa State College, now Iowa State University, in the midst of the Depression with no job prospects in Iowa. Wendell H. Harmon describes choosing to leave Iowa for a homestead near Elk City, Oregon, in 1933. He talks about farming the land on the homestead, and Florence E. Harmon talks about their neighbors. She also talks about her experience being fired from her teaching job as a result of her marriage to Wendell H. Harmon. They discuss their experience setting up their homestead, including building and furnishing a house, preparing the land, and raising livestock. They talk about maintaining the homestead after Wendell H. Harmon accepted a forestry job in 1935 that involved work primarily outside Oregon, and about the process of acquiring the deed to the land. They close the interview by discussing tree farming, as well as the sale of their homestead.

Harmon, Wendell H. (Wendell Harold), 1910-1999

Aaron M. Frank address to Meier and Frank employees

  • SR 294
  • Collection
  • 1949-03-24

This speech was delivered by Aaron M. Frank on March 24, 1949, at the Meier & Frank Department Store in Portland, Oregon. In this speech, Frank urges the assembled store employees to resist union organizing efforts. He enumerates the benefits provided to employees by Meier & Frank, gives examples of management and employee loyalty, lists his responsibilities as director, and makes a plea for an employee vote of confidence. The employees ultimately voted against unionization.

Frank, Aaron M. (Aaron Meier), 1891-1968

Oral history interview with John R. Leach

  • SR 758
  • Collection
  • 1968-02-22 - 1968-02-23

This oral history interview with John R. Leach was conducted by Jean S. Whitford from February 22-23, 1968. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 22, 1968, Leach discusses his wife, Lilla Leach. He tells stories from his recently published autobiography, "Oxbows and Bare Feet," including his remembrances of Sam Warfield, known as "Uncle Sam"; Lorenzo Chapman; Joe Meeks; and others in the Lexington, Oregon, area. He also discusses the history of the Leach family and their journey west to Oregon.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 23, 1968, Leach discusses frontier life, folk medicine, and his childhood and early life in Eastern Oregon. He closes the interview by describing his adventures with Lilla Leach.

Leach, John Roy, 1882-1972

Oral history interview with Erskine Wood

  • SR 1096
  • Collection
  • 1954-08-21

This oral history interview with Erskine Wood was conducted by William Renwick at Wood's home in Vancouver, Washington, on August 21, 1954. In this interview, Wood discusses his experiences as an adolescent living with Chief Joseph and the Nimiipuu people (Nez Perce tribe) in the Wallowa Valley, Oregon. He briefly talks about Chief Joseph's life story. He speaks about his daily life, including caring for horses, hunting, and taking sweat baths. He closes the interview by describing some Nez Perce recreational activities, including dancing, singing, and games.

Wood, Erskine

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26 - 1989-04-26

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session.

In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Clara May Patterson

  • SR 44
  • Collection
  • 1980-06-11

This oral history interview with Clara May Patterson was conducted by Mary Cowan and Ruth Kinon on June 11, 1980. The interviewers are not identified in the audio, so their names are inferred from the handwriting on the physical audiocassette.

In this interview, Patterson describes her experience singing in the choir at the Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905. She then discusses her family background and early life in Camas, Washington, including the medical career of her father, Theophilius C. Humphrey, and the houses her family lived in. She then talks about her later life in Portland, Oregon, including raising a family. She closes the interview by describing the overland journey of the Humphrey family from Iowa to Oregon in 1852.

Patterson, Clara May, 1882-1982

Oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler

  • SR 44-1
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-27

This oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler was conducted at the home of Peggy Wetzler. The first session was conducted by Bernice Pluchos of the Camas-Washougal Historical Society on February 27, 1981, and the second session was conducted by Peggy Wetzler on February 28, 1981. The sound quality is extremely poor.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 27, 1981, Dalton discusses her family background and early life on Government Island, Oregon, including life on the family ranch, transportation, and her social life. She also briefly talks about her wedding to Louis Stanis Dalton in 1907. Wetzler also discusses her family background and early life in Long Beach, Washington.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 28, 1981, Dalton continues discussing her early life on Government Island, including her education, other families that lived on the island, and floods. She also describes the house she lived in. Wetzler and Dalton talk about taking ferry boats to and from Government Island, catching crabs on the beach, and life in Long Beach, Washington. Wetzler closes the tape with a brief narrative of Rose Iva Dalton's family history and additional historical information about Government Island and Long Beach.

Dalton, Rose Iva, 1881-1984

Oral history interview with Howard C. Reed

  • SR 172
  • Collection
  • 1988-07-30

This oral history interview with Howard C. Reed was conducted by an unidentified man on July 30, 1988. In this interview, Reed discusses a giant brown trout that was caught at Paulina Lake in 1965, which weighed 35 pounds, 9 ounces. He also talks about the history of Paulina Lake Lodge, which his family had owned since 1929.

Reed, Howard C. (Howard Charles), 1913-2000

Oral history interview with Howard C. Stearns

  • SR 460
  • Collection
  • 1980-01-21 - 1980-01-23

This oral history interview with Howard C. Stearns was conducted by Leon Speroff from January 21-23, 1980. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 21, 1980, Stearns discusses his career as a member of the University of Oregon Medical School faculty, including other members of the faculty, running his own medical practice on the side, and his promotion to department chair in 1945. He also talks about his reasons for leaving the university in 1957. He then discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon; his service in the Merchant Marines during World War I; and his experience studying entomology at Oregon State University, and medicine at the University of Oregon Medical School. He talks about practicing obstetrics and gynecology and describes some of the common procedures he conducted, including some graphic descriptions of childbirth.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1980, Stearns continues to discuss practicing obstetrics and gynecology. He talks about his service as chair of the of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oregon Medical School. He then discusses his children, their careers, and their families. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland and teaching obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oregon Medical School.

Stearns, Howard C. (Howard Cecil), 1900-1985

Oral history interview with Ralph B. Bennett

  • SR 483
  • Collection
  • 1991-06-08

This oral history interview with Ralph B. Bennett was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Bennett's home in San Diego, California, on June 8, 1991. In this interview, Bennett discusses his family background. He talks about taking over The Optimist, a newspaper run by his father, Ralph B. Bennett, Sr., in The Dalles, Oregon. He talks about campaigning for public power and working with then-lawyer Gus Solomon, and how that led to him working for the Bonneville Power Administration. He then discusses his experience at Harvard University, including working on the student newspaper and his views about World War II before 1942. He also describes his political philosophy. He discusses working in public relations for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1946 to 1947, including people he worked with, his association with Woody Guthrie, and his work promoting public power. He also talks about leftist politics in Oregon. He describes living in Vanport, including running a newsletter and his experience during the 1948 flood. He briefly talks about working as a reporter for the Wenatchee Daily World in Ephrata, Washington, and his continued advocacy for public power. He then revisits the topics of working in public relations for the Bonneville Power Administration, living in Vanport, and his political philosophy. He closes the interview by talking more about Woody Guthrie.

Bennett, Ralph B. (Ralph Blackhurst), 1920-2002

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis

  • SR 801
  • Collection
  • 1991-01-29

This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church.

McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse

  • SR 1713
  • Collection
  • 1991-01-15 - 1991-02-20

This oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse was conducted by Susan L. Smith in West Linn, Oregon, from January 15 to February 20, 1991. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Rick Sanders interviews with relatives

  • SR 2935
  • Collection
  • 1981-06-11 - 1998-03-24

Interviews with Ruth Wilcox, Leam Thomas, and Bradford Tompleman conducted by Rick Sanders from June 11, 1981, to March 24, 1998, as part of genealogical research by Sanders about his family.

The interview with Ruth Wilcox was conducted on June 11, 1981, at her home. The interview is approximately five minutes long. Wilcox was an aunt to Rick Sanders. She talks about her grandmother, who is identified as a member of the Sanders family. She speaks about her family background.

The interview with Leam Thomas was conducted on June 27, 1997. The interview is approximately eight minutes long. Thomas speaks about his family background, about his family real estate business, and about his career as a millworker in California. He also talks about his experiences in India during World War II.

The interview with Bradford Tompleman was conducted on March 25, 1998, in San Francisco, California. The interview is approximately 10 minutes long. Tompleman was a second cousin, once removed, of Rick Sanders. He speaks about his family background.

Sanders, Rick

Milwaukie Pastry Kitchen photographs and news clippings

  • Org. Lot 1311
  • Collection
  • 1977-1988

The collection consists of six photographs showing cakes made by the Milwaukie Pastry Kitchen, Hurtis Hadley decorating cakes, and wearing his Albertsons Bakery uniform after he closed the Pastry Kitchen. In addition to the photographs, there are 21 clippings from newspaper articles about Hurtis Hadley and Dorothy Hadley. Most of the clippings relate to the Pastry Kitchen, but some relate to Hurtis Hadley’s decorating mentor, Larry Powell, or to Hadley’s work at other bakeries. Materials range from 1977 to 1988.

Flowers family photographs

  • Org. Lot 865
  • Collection
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of 27 original photographs and copy prints relating to the Flowers family of Portland, Oregon. The photographs date from approximately 1860 to 1955. They are primarily portraits and snapshots of members of the Flowers family, including Allen Ervin Flowers; his wife, Louisa Mathilda Flowers; and their sons, Lloyd A. Flowers, Ralph Perpeno Flowers, Elmer Allen Flowers, and Ervin Milton Flowers. Also included are photographs from several Flowers family business enterprises, including the Flowers family farm, the Flowers automotive repair and sales lot, a jitney bus operated by Ralph Flowers, and beach cottages at Oceanlake, Oregon.

Oral history interview with Lawrence Leighton Smith

  • SR 9343
  • Collection
  • 1980-05-12

This oral history interview with Lawrence Leighton Smith was conducted by Linda S. Dodds on May 12, 1980, in Portland, Oregon, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Portland, particularly his early musical education. He talks about his experience studying music at Portland State University, with Ariel Rubstein, and at Mannes College of Music. He describes serving as assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera from 1964 to 1967. He then speaks at length about his career as conductor and music director for the Oregon Symphony in Portland from 1973 to 1980, including working with musicians, developing programs, and playing to Oregon audiences. He closes the interview by talking about his hopes for his next career as music director for the San Antonio Symphony.

Smith, Lawrence Leighton

Oral history interview with Richard Bryson

  • SR 1258
  • Collection
  • 1990-03-14 - 1990-04-11

This oral history interview with Richard Bryson was conducted by Les M. Swanson, Jr. at Bryson's office in Eugene, Oregon, from March 14 to April 11, 1990. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 14, 1990, Bryson discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including the law career of his father, Edwin R. Bryson, and grandfather, John R. Bryson; his education; and his interest in golf. He speaks at length about studying law at Stanford University and the University of Oregon, including his professors and social life. He briefly talks about his service in counterintelligence in Europe during World War II. He discusses working as a lawyer in Eugene, and talks about judges he argued before, including G.F. Skipworth and James Alger Fee. He discusses some of the cases he worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 11, 1990, Bryson continues to discuss his work as a lawyer in Eugene, and to talk about judges he argued before. He speaks about lawyers he worked with, particularly Windsor Calkins. He also revisits the topic of his early life in Eugene and his father's law career. He closes the interview by talking about cases he worked on.

Bryson, A. Richard (Arthur Richard), 1916-1999

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