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Oral history interview with Jean Black, by Karen Wingo

  • SR 9096
  • Collection
  • 1980-052-07

Black discusses his early life and education, studying in Rome, working in various research and academic libraries across the country, teaching library science, coming to Vanport, Oregon in 1946 to be a librarian at Vanport College, dealing with the aftermath of the 1948 flood, and the early history of the Portland State University library.

Black, Jean P.

Oral history with Rev. Dr. LeRoy Haynes, Jr., by Jan Dilg

Haynes discusses his family background and early life in Texas, his civil rights activism, his education, including his time at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, his early clerical career, his appointment to Allen Temple AME Church and moving to Portland, Oregon, his involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance, his continuing activism, and his book God's Prophet in Non-Violence: The Theology and Philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Haynes, LeRoy, Jr.

Oral history interview with Bill Curtin, by Greta Smith

Curtin discusses his family background and early childhood, Catholicism, the KKK, Portland Police, Unions, Bill's time in the seminary, St. Charles Catholic Church & School, Immaculate Heart Catholic Church & School, Father Tobin, Father Griffin, Father Robert Krueger, Emmanuel Hospital expansion project, Urban Renewal, Model Cities, Albina Fair Share, Oregon Fair Share, Organizing for activism in Albina, Saul Alinsky, Night life in Albina, Shops, businesses, people in Albina, Dawson's Park, Police community relations in Albina, Drug and alcohol recovery programs in Albina (the Victory Club and the Miracles Club), and Leaving the priesthood.

Curtin, Bill

Oral history interview with Lori Stegmann

This oral history interview with Lori Stegmann was conducted by Sankar Raman and Alia Burck on September 7, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Stegmann discusses her adoption in 1960 from South Korea through Holt International. She describes her early life in Lincoln City and in Gresham, Oregon, including encountering racism at a young age, her family life, and her early education. She talks about attending high school reunions, her involvement with school stage productions, and her early role models. She also talks about the lack of Asian representation in Western media. She discusses the career path that led her to become a member of the Gresham City Council, including working as an insurance agent. She talks about her decision to change her party affiliation from Republican to Democratic in 2018 and the rise of overt racism in the Republican Party since the 2016 election. She talks about her daughter, her adoptive family, and her connection to the Asian and Pacific Islander communities in east Multnomah County. She also talks about a trip she took to South Korea in 2017. She closes the interview by discussing her experience being a person of color raised by a white family, and her interest in Korean culture.

Stegmann, Lori, 1960-

Oral history interview with Brenda Neri-Wong

This oral history interview with Brenda Neri-Wong was conducted by Sankar Raman and Briana Ybanez on August 22, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Neri-Wong discusses her family background and the blood disorder that spurred her parents to bring her to the United States in 1995. Neri-Wong continues discussing her family background, particularly her connection to her Chinese heritage, her family's financial situation in Mexico, and their journey to the United States. She talks about moving to Oregon, her education, and learning English as a second language. She also speaks about trying to fit in and make friends, and about her plans to become a teacher. She shares her experience as an undocumented immigrant, the constant anxiety it has caused, and the barriers it placed before her. She discusses attending Portland Community College and transferring to Portland State University, including paying for college and learning to navigate the higher education system as an undocumented immigrant. She then talks about her current job as a graduation coach in the Hillsboro School District. She discusses her status as a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provides legal protections for some undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. She talks about her hopes for the future. She closes the interview by talking about the political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, her experience with white privilege, and working toward systemic change.

Neri-Wong, Brenda J., 1993-

Oral history interview with Zsuzsanna Vamos

This oral history interview with Zsuszanna Vamos was conducted by Sankar and Briana Ybanez on August 20, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vamos discusses her family background and early life in Budapest, Hungary, including conditions under the Communist government, her education, and listening to American radio as a teenager. She talks about her interest in chemistry and her admiration for Marie Curie, as well as her experiences attending Semmelweis University to study pharmacology. She discusses her marriage to Istvan Adany and his career, and she talks about her career in biomedical research and frustration at her inability to do the research she wanted. She then talks about applying for jobs in other countries, which led to a job offer from Kansas University Medical Center. She describes the process of immigrating to the United States and adjusting to life afterward. She talks about her children, their careers, and their families. She discusses getting her green card in 1997, Istvan Adany's career in the U.S., and their move to Hillsboro, Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her work as an artist, her thoughts on the American Dream, and her reaction to the treatment of refugees at the time of the interview in 2018.

Vamos, Zsuzsanna, 1953-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Hassan discusses his early life in Basra, Iraq, including the history and culture of Iraq before 1958, and his early art education. He then talks about studying art at universities in Baghdad, Iraq, and Rome, Italy. He discusses returning to Iraq in 1980 and his experience during the Iran-Iraq War. He describes some of the atrocities of Saddam Hussein and how he managed to evade the militias. He also talks about his marriage to fellow artist Haifa Al Habeeb. Hassan discusses his artwork, including his influences and methods, and his career after the end of the Iran-Iraq War. He also talks about designing stamps for the Iraqi government and giving some of his works to the Iraq Museum. He describes his life after the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Hassan and Raman discuss an exhibition of Hassan's artwork planned for later in 2018. Hassan talks about his reasons for immigrating to the United States in 2010, and discusses his daughter and her family. Hassan talks about the materials he uses in his painting and drawing, the development of his art technique, and the loss of several of his paintings during the looting of the Iraq Museum in 2003. Hassan and Sankar look at some of Hassan's artworks and discuss them. Hassan closes the interview by talking about his career as an artist in the Pacific Northwest.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

Oral history interview with Janet Liu

This oral history interview with Janet Liu was conducted by Sankar Raman and Jessica Pollard on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Liu discusses the reasons her parents and their families fled Communist China in 1949, her connection to Chinese culture, and her early life in Taipei, Taiwan. She also talks about the history of Japanese and Chinese oppression of native Taiwanese people. She discusses immigrating with her mother to the United States to join her father in Madison, Wisconsin, including adapting to American culture and the Midwestern climate, learning English, and her experience as the only Chinese student in her school. She talks about the 1961 executive order by President John F. Kennedy that enabled her family to immigrate to the United States. She then talks about her father's death a few years later and the subsequent threat of deportation; moving to California; and her education in the United States, including her interest in mathematics. She discusses receiving legal U.S. residency in 1968, studying math at San Jose State University and the University of California at Berkeley, and working as a computer programmer in San Jose. She talks about getting her MBA from Santa Clara University and pursuing a career in finance. She also talks about her marriage to her step-brother in 1989, as well as their divorce in 2001 due to his violence; the education and career of her daughter; and her real estate investments. She discusses her vegan diet; her life in Lake Oswego, Oregon; and her daughter's relationship with her father. She closes the interview by speaking about the difficulty of discussing domestic violence and the effect it had on her daughter.

Liu, Janet, 1951-

Oral history interview with Jaime Miranda

This oral history interview with Jaime Miranda was conducted by Keven Salazar on August 1, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted in both English and Spanish. In the interview, Miranda discusses his business, M & M Marketplace, in Hillsboro, Oregon. He talks about his early life in Mexico City, Mexico, including making a living by helping his mother work as a street vendor. Miranda and Salazar then converse in Spanish for several minutes about Salazar's studies, as well as the diverse populations in Gresham and Beaverton, Oregon. Miranda then returns to the topic of his early life in Mexico City and speaks at length about growing up in poverty. He talks about living with his extended family in Juárez while his parents and siblings immigrated to the United States. Miranda and Salazar again converse informally in Spanish. Miranda then talks about joining his family in the U.S. at the end of 1985, and he discusses his life in California, including his education and working in the fields with his family. He closes the interview by discussing the importance of education.

Miranda, Jaime, 1974-

Oral history interview with Brianda Alcazar

This oral history interview with Brianda Alcazar was conducted by Keven Salazar on July 22, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Alcazar discusses her family background and early life in Michoacán, Mexico. She then describes coming to the United States with her family at age 6 and settling in the Portland, Oregon, area. She talks about her education and learning English as a second language. She discusses balancing her schoolwork with the expectation that she would fulfill traditional gender roles at home; leaving home at age 15; and continuing her education as a teenage mother. She describes her living conditions during the first years after the birth of her oldest child. She talks about studying at Portland Community College, her involvement with the Women's Resource Center, and balancing her education while raising children. She discusses the importance of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in her daily life. She talks about dealing with racial discrimination, including explaining racism to her children; and describes her ethnic and cultural identity. She closes the interview by talking about her current activities and plans for the future.

Alcazar, Brianda, 1993-

Oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa

This oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa was conducted by Sankar Raman and Elizabeth Mehren on July 19, 2018. Amy Tsugawa, Jim Tsugawa's wife, was also present and contributed at the end of the interview. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Jim Tsugawa discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He describes his experience of being incarcerated by the U.S. government, including his family's detention at the Portland Livestock Pavilion and transfer to the Minidoka War Relocation Camp in Idaho. He also discusses his older brother Henry Tsugawa's military service during World War II. He talks about his family being sponsored by a reverend for residency in Boise, Idaho, and briefly describes his childhood there. He talks about the family renting a strawberry farm in Ontario, Oregon, and his high school experience in Beaverton, Oregon, particularly his interest in sports. He speaks briefly about attending Lewis & Clark College on a sports scholarship, then discusses his experience in the U.S. Army and being stationed in Zweibrücken, Germany, during the Korean War. He talks about studying at Oregon State University after his discharge, and about earning his degree in dentistry from the University of Oregon Dental School, which is now part of Oregon Health & Science University. He then briefly speaks about his marriage to Amy Goda, now Amy Tsugawa, her family background, and her experience of incarceration by the U.S. government during World War II. He discusses the U.S. political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, particularly the Trump administration's immigration policies. Mehren and Tsugawa discuss the large Asian populations in California and Hawaii. Tsugawa describes a recent trip to the Minidoka National Historic Site and revisits the topics of his childhood and playing sports. Amy Tsugawa closes the interview by talking about spending her teenage years in postwar Japan.

Tsugawa, Jim M. (James Masao), 1932-

Oral history interview with Mussa Amissi

This oral history interview with Mussa Amissi was conducted by Sankar Raman and Alia Burck on July 18, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. A woman identified only as Susan was also present.

In this interview, Amissi discusses his early life in the Democratic Republic of Congo, including the death of his father. He then talks about his family's journey to Burundi and his life and education there. He also talks about a medical issue that affected one of his brothers. Amissi discusses the process of coming to the United States as a refugee, and settling in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his education in Portland, including learning English as a second language. He also discusses his passion for and involvement with soccer. He describes the death of his mother when he was 13 years old and the effect it had on his family. Susan speaks at length about Amissi's educational achievements. Amissi speaks further about playing soccer. He talks about his plans for college and the future. He closes the interview by talking about his hobbies and friends, as well as the support his family has received from his community.

Amissi, Mussa, 2000-

Oral history interview with Abel F. Getachew

This oral history interview with Abel F. Getachew was conducted by Sankar Raman and Gina Ruggeri on June 11, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Getachew discusses his family background and early life in Ethiopia, including his education, social life, and playing soccer. He talks about his mother's disappearance in 2007; learning later that she had immigrated to the United States; and his life in Ethiopia until he was able to join her in 2012. He describes the process of immigrating to the U.S. and adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his education in Portland, including learning English as a second language, playing soccer, and participating in various academic extracurricular activities. He also talks about his experience at Roosevelt High School and transferring to De La Salle North Catholic High School. He discusses his plans to pursue a career in the medical field and interning at Oregon Health & Science University. He talks about applying for colleges and scholarships. He speaks at length about creating an organization, Hope for Bright Future, to support other immigrant students. He closes the interview by discussing his plan to attend Georgetown University, then medical school, and to become a cardiovascular surgeon.

Getachew, Abel F., 2000-

Oral history interview with Maria Garcia

This oral history interview with Maria Garcia was conducted by Maleya Luis on June 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Garcia discusses her life in Mexico, the Mexico peso crisis of 1994, and immigrating to Palm Springs, California. She talks about her experience as a teenage parent immigrant in the United States and the ways the language barrier and being undocumented affected her. She talks about learning English as a second language; experiencing domestic violence and divorcing the father of her child; and getting American citizenship in 2010. She discusses her cultural and ethnic identity. She then talks about moving to Portland, Oregon, and opening the Revolución Coffee House. She also discusses learning to cook with her grandmother as a child. Garcia talks about her activism for Latino immigrants, her campaign for Multnomah County commissioner in 2018, and systemic racism. She speaks at length about the reasons people choose to come to the United States and presents some solutions to the treatment of undocumented immigrants at the time of the interview in 2018. She closes the interview by discussing the importance of cultural diversity and urging immigrants not to lose their cultural roots.

Garcia, Maria, 1977-

Oral history interview with Nabin Dhimal

This oral history interview with Nabin Dhimal was conducted by Sankar Raman on May 19, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Dhimal discusses his family's background in Bhutan and his early life in a refugee camp in Nepal, including his education, celebrating Diwali, and a fire in 2008 that destroyed his family's home. He talks about resettling in the United States and adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon. He describes his education in Oregon, including learning English as a foreign language, being bullied, and some of the people who motivated him to do well, particularly his speech teacher, Patrick Gonzales. He also talks about the education and careers of his siblings. He speaks about his college education, being a recipient of a diversity scholarship, and his plans to pursue a post-graduate degree. He closes the interview by discussing his plans for the future.

Dhimal, Nabin

Oral history interview with Abood Aldabea

This oral history interview with Abood Aldabea was conducted by Sankar Raman on May 18, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Aldabea's family was present, and they occasionally contributed in Arabic. An unidentified neighbor was also present.

In this interview, Aldabea discusses his early life in Damascus, Syria, including his education, family, and neighborhood. He also describes some of his favorite Syrian foods. He shares his memories of the civil war in Syria, including being gassed by the Syrian military while heading home from his mosque and bombings in his neighborhood. He talks about fleeing to Jordan, and about life in Jordan as a Syrian refugee. He describes the process of being resettled in the United States in 2014. The unidentified neighbor talks about helping Aldabea's family get established in Portland, Oregon. Aldabea talks about adjusting to life in Portland, his education, and his involvement in sports. He closes the interview by discussing learning English as a second language, his friends, and his plans for the future.

Aldabea, Abood (Abdulelah), 2002-

Oral history interview with Victor D. Bencomo Acevedo

This oral history interview with Victor D. Bencomo Acevedo was conducted by Kristin Cole and Sankar Raman in two sessions on May 4, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the first interview session, Bencomo Acevedo discusses his family and early life in Venezuela. He talks about his college experience, his opposition to the government of Hugo Chávez, and the oppression he and his family experienced. He discusses studying economics and working at Benesco Banco Universal. He describes dealing with food shortages in Venezuela; the attempts on his life by Venezuelan paramilitary groups, known as "colectivos," including the kidnapping of his sister, as a result of his attendance at a protest; and his escape from Venezuela in 2014. He talks about studying business English in Portland, Oregon, as a student through the Kaplan International Institute, receiving word that he had been officially declared a traitor to Venezuela, and the plight of his family still in Venezuela. He discusses the process for applying for asylum in the United States; the mental toll of his experiences; and the community he has found in Portland.

In the second interview session, he discusses the risks involved in sharing his story, his sister's kidnapping by colectivos, and the safety of his family at the time of the interview in 2018.

Bencomo Acevedo, Victor D. (Victor Daniel), 1987-

Oral history interview with Rahel Nardos

This oral history interview with Rahel Nardos was conducted by Sankar Raman and Maleya Luis on March 28, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Nardos discusses her early life in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, including life under communism, access to health care, and her education. She talks about her experience attending the International Community School in Addis Ababa as a scholarship student. She also talks about the famine in Ethiopia during the 1980s. She then talks about applying for college in the United States and attending Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania; about the barriers to her plans to attend medical school in the United States as an immigrant; and adjusting to life in the U.S. She also shares an anecdote about her first encounter with the U.S. customs agency. She discusses the U.S. political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, including her experiences with racism. She talks about attending Yale School of Medicine, including financing her education; her reasons for specializing in obstetrics and gynecology; and settling in Oregon. She speaks about a 2018 op-ed she wrote for the Oregonian newspaper, titled "My patients don't care I'm from a 'shithole' country," and talks about the increase in racism since Donald Trump was elected president in 2016. She discusses balancing family life with her career as a doctor; her work in women's health in Ethiopia with Footsteps to Healing; and her other volunteer work. She closes the interview by discussing her cultural and ethnic identity.

Nardos, Rahel

Oral history interview with Masumi Timson

This oral history interview with Masumi Timson was conducted by Sankar Raman and Giacomo Ranieri on March 19, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Timson discusses her early life on Tokunoshima Island in Japan, including Japanese cultural practices and her early education. She describes her first time hearing the koto and her subsequent fascination with the instrument, as well as growing up in a musical family. She talks about studying koto music at Seiha Conservatory of Traditional Japanese Music while also studying English at Kansai Junior College (now known as Kansai Gaidai College) in Hirakata, Osaka. She describes the reception her koto performances received in Oregon and how that inspired her to become much more serious about her music. She talks about her marriage to Stephen F. Timson in 1977 and immigrating to the United States in 1991. She also describes some of the mechanics of the koto. She talks about teaching koto at the Willamette University Koto Club, performing in Oregon and Japan, and her longtime collaboration with Pink Martini. She also talks about her koto collection. She discusses her cultural and ethnic identity, particularly how the koto helps her keep her connection to her Japanese roots. She closes the interview by talking about the future of koto music in Japan, Japanese traditions and culture, and her koto students.

Timson, Masumi S. (Masumi Sakura), 1953-

Oral history interview with Ruben Estrada-Herrera

This oral history interview with Ruben Estrada-Herrera was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 15, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Estrada-Herrera discusses his early life in Santiago, Cuba, including the festival of Carnavales, his education, and Cuban culture. He describes the process of immigrating to the United States in 2011. He talks about his life in Portland, Oregon, including his parents' careers, his education, and learning English as a second language. He discusses earning scholarships, choosing to attend Warner Pacific University, and studying bio-medical engineering. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future and his thoughts on the American Dream.

Estrada-Herrera, Ruben, 1995-

Oral history interview with Felix Songolo

This oral history interview with Felix Songolo was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Songolo discusses his family background, the reasons his parents fled the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1997, and his early life in Lusaka, Zambia. He then talks about immigrating to the United States in 2004 and settling in Portland, Oregon. Hetalks about his siblings and his early education in Portland. He discusses the Catholic charities that facilitated his family's settlement in the U.S., as well as his own involvement in the Catholic Church. He talks about his parents' careers; describes his experience as one of only a few black students in his classes; and discusses his cultural and ethnic identity, as well as some of the discrimination he experienced. He speaks at length about his middle and high school education at Catholic schools. He discusses experiences in the eighth grade that helped him to become more comfortable with his African heritage and to take his education seriously. He then speaks at length about his education as De La Salle North Catholic High School; applying for college; and playing soccer. He talks about his plans for college at Georgetown University, his volunteer work on behalf of immigrants and refugees, and scholarships he has applied for. He closes the interview by talking about his thoughts on the American Dream.

Songolo, Felix (Felix Uredi Faraja), 2000-

Oral history interview with Jhoana Monroy-Espinoza

This oral history interview with Jhoana Monroy-Espinoza was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 5, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Espinoza discusses her early life in Pachuca, Mexico, and the journey to the United States in 1997. She talks about life as an undocumented immigrant in Beaverton, Oregon, including her education and the racial discrimination she and her family faced. She then talks about becoming a teenage parent and refocusing on her education. She talks about marrying her partner and being denied a green card due to her undocumented status; the deportation of some of her family members; and applying for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. She talks about studying at Portland Community College and her plans for the future. She closes the interview by discussing the stress of living with undocumented status, the systemic racism in the United States, and her work with the Dream Center.

Monroy-Espinoza, Jhoana, 1991-

Oral history interview with Alejandro Vilches

This an oral history interview with Alejandro Vilches was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 3, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vilches discusses his family background and early life in Bryan, Texas, including his father's education there. He then discusses his life in Honduras from ages 4 to 28, including being bilingual, his education, and his siblings. He also talks about his father's career as a pilot and death in an airplane accident, as well as his mother raising their family as a single parent. He describes the Honduran people and culture. He discusses studying computer science at the Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and the pressure he felt to succeed as the oldest child. He also talks about holding dual citizenship and his cultural and ethnic identity. He talks about coming to the United States to study computer science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, including the differences in American and Honduran cultural norms, the diverse student body, and his social life. He discusses interning for Intel during the summers while at Purdue, and then beginning work as a software engineer for the company in Hillsboro, Oregon, shortly after he graduated. He also talks about his robotics-related volunteer work. He closes the interview by discussing how his views have changed regarding immigration and the value of diversity.

Vilches, Alejandro, 1980-

Oral history interview with Eva Aigner and Les Aigner

This oral history interview with Eva Aigner and Les Aigner was conducted in two sessions in 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The first session was conducted by Jim Lommasson and Sankar Raman. The second session was conducted by Elizabeth Mehren and Sankar Raman.

In the first session of this interview, Lommasson describes a recent exhibit he worked on called "What We Carried," and gives a copy of a related book to the Aigners. The Aigners discuss their work with the Holocaust Memorial Coalition and the Holocaust Memorial in Portland, Oregon. They also talk about the few personal possessions and photographs they still have from their lives before and during the Holocaust; Les Aigner's experience being sent to Dachau on the "death train"; and Eva Aigner's experience being rescued by her mother while awaiting execution along the Danube with her sister. Les Aigner also talks about his few months in Auschwitz, and they both discuss a trip they took to all the death camp sites, Auschwitz included. They then talk about scheduling for the next interview session and make small talk.

In the second session, the Aigners discuss their work educating the public about the Holocaust. They talk about the circumstances that led to the Holocaust, including the increasing anti-Semitism they experienced. They also talk about life in post-war Communist Hungary. Les Aigner describes his experience in Auschwitz, including the deaths of his mother and sister in the gas chambers; describes returning to Auschwitz on a recent trip; and discusses his liberation from Dachau in 1945. Eva Aigner talks about living in the Jewish ghetto in Budapest, Hungary, her mother's escape from the freight train taking her to a death camp; and the liberation of the ghetto in 1945. Eva Aigner also talks about another unnamed Holocaust survivor's story.

The Aigners describe life in post-war Communist Hungary, including food shortages during the 1956 revolution and their decision to flee. They describe escaping to Austria on Christmas Eve of 1956, immigrating to the United States, and settling in Portland, Oregon. They warn that the Holocaust could happen again, and discuss current political issues that alarm them. They talk about the jobs they worked in Portland, and Eva speaks at length about working as a cosmetologist. They close the interview by discussing the importance of sharing stories like theirs.

Aigner, Eva Erica, 1937-

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