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Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers’ experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator. In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life. In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition’s efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby, who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral History Interview with Bette Lee, by Sandy Polishuk [Transcript]

Transcript. Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel was conducted by Adair Law from October 30 to December 5, 2006. Along with the interview recordings, the collection includes an incomplete transcript. In this interview, Stoel discusses her family background and early life in Lexington, North Carolina, including her early education and childhood friends. She talks about attending Duke University, including her social life. She then talks about her experience as one the few women attending the Duke University Law School. She also discusses meeting Thomas B. Stoel and their subsequent marriage. She describes the sexism she faced when trying to begin her legal career in Portland, Oregon. She talks about working and raising young children while Thomas Stoel was serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. She discusses her involvement in her children’s education in the Riverdale School District; her acquaintanceship with Richard Nixon; and her decision to return to college. She closes the interview by talking about her children, their careers, and their families.

Stoel, Caroline P.

Oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins was conducted by Mary Ellen Smith at the Multnomah Law Library in Portland, Oregon, from February 23, 2006, to April 13, 2007. In this interview, Jurkins discusses her early life and high school experience in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. She then talks about attending the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh and the discouragement she received from professors when she expressed her desire to become a lawyer. She speaks about studying law at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, including her experience as one of only a few women in the law school, her social life, and some of her professors. She also describes the events that led her to working in the university’s law library. She talks about her decision to go to library school and pursue a career as a law librarian. She discusses studying law librarianship at the University of Washington, including her primary professor, Marian Gallagher; her fellow students; and working in the university’s library. She then talks about working at the University of Washington law library, helping to establish the Pacific Rim Library, and her experience reorganizing the Colorado Supreme Court Library.Jurkins discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, in 1964 to head the Multnomah Law Library. She talks about the disarray in which she found the library and her work reorganizing it. She describes providing organizational help for many other law libraries in Oregon. She discusses the expansion of the law library, the different buildings it has occupied, and her staff. She talks about the changes in information technology and how that has affected her library work, as well as the use of the library. She talks about the increased security at the library and courthouses as a result of shootings. She discusses some of the lawyers, judges, and politicians who patronized the library; setting up a library at the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College; and her role in the foundation of the Oregon Council of Law Libraries. She discusses teaching classes on legal research at Portland Community College, as well as her involvement with the Multnomah County Bar Association and the American Association of Law Libraries. She closes the interview by talking about her hobbies.

Jurkins, Jacque (Jacquelyn), 1928-

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman [Transcript]

Transcript. This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman’s office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns.

Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.

Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006. In this interview, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon’s first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde, and some of the opinions he wrote. He closes the interview by discussing the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government; changes in the judiciary; and his advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Edward Leavy [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy’s chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge’s role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he’s had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

Leavy, Edward, 1929-

Oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Robinson's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 12 to March 10, 2004. In this interview, Robsinson discusses his family background and early life in Georgia; he describes life as a black person in the segregated South, his early education, and growing up on a farm. He talks about attending Southwestern Christian College in Texas, and moving to Portland, Oregon, after graduation. He describes working for National Biscuit Company (now known as Nabisco Inc.), racism he faced in Oregon, and his marriage to and later divorce from Beverlee Foreman. He then talks about giving up plans to become a minister and instead attending Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College. He also talks about taking the Oregon Bar exam.Robinson discusses starting his private law practice in Portland. He talks about arguing cases before Judge Gus Solomon and some of the cases he handled. He then discusses working as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about cases he prosecuted (and a few he chose not to prosecute), and arguing against public defenders. He also discusses systemic racism in the criminal justice system. He discusses serving on the Oregon Parole Board, including some of the decisions he made. He discusses serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court, including his appointment in 1990. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, as well as numerous other organizations. He discusses cases he heard on the Circuit Court, judicial procedure, and programs to reduce recidivism. He discusses his involvement with the community court program and the drug diversion court program. He closes the interview by talking about his children, their families, and their careers; his health; and the Roosevelt Robinson scholarship fund.

Robinson, Roosevelt, 1941-2004

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from January 9 to May 20, 2002. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon. She talks about her mother and brother contracting tuberculosis; how she was raised by her grandparents; and her early education. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including her professors; her involvement in student government and politics in general; and meeting Bill Frye and their subsequent marriage. She talks about teaching high school in Eugene, raising a family, and returning to the University of Oregon to study law.Frye briefly discusses practicing law in Eugene and specializing in adoption. She talks about serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall. She also discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including her appointment by President Jimmy Carter. She talks about the cases she heard; judges she served with; and court procedure. She discusses sentencing; the role of dissent in lower courts; and the role of juries. She closes the interview by discussing her legal philosophy and how her opinions have evolved over the years.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from September 19-26, 2001. In this interview, Herbold discusses her family background and early life, including moving around often due to her father’s Navy career. She speaks briefly about attending the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon Law School, and about the sexism women college students faced. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, including her experience as the first woman trial attorney at the Dusendorf, Spears, Lubersky law firm. She describes starting a law firm with Dave Markowitz, the lawyers she hired, and cases she handled.

Herbold, Barrie J. (Barrie Jane), 1949-2001

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O’Rourke at Joseph’s home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph’s entire life and career. Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family’s own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans, and other events, during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr’s family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney’s office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney’s office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney’s office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark’s accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 07)

Tape 4 Side 1. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 05)

Tape 3 Side 1. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 06)

Tape 3 Side 2. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 01)

Tape 1 Side 1. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 02)

Tape 1 Side 2. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 04)

Tape 2 Side 2. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Transcript)

Transcript. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interviews with Norm Costa (Sound Recording 03)

Tape 2 Side 1. Norm Costa has lived in the Portland metro area since 1958. He transitioned from an engineering career to running his own beauty salon in Lake Oswego for several years during the 1960's. More recently, Costa has worked for decades as a gay rights activist, mostly working with local health departments on HIV prevention efforts. This interview describes many aspects of the gay experience in Portland over the course of those years, including his experience with politics and activism, personal experiences, gay-oriented clubs and businesses over the years, and the spread of the HIV virus in the early 1980's.

Costa, Norm

Oral history interview with Asa Lewelling [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Asa Lewelling was conducted by Vinita Howard at Lewelling's home in Independence, Oregon, from November 6, 2000, to January 15, 2001. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project, which collected interviews with notable figures in the wine-growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon's wine industry. The interview was conducted in five sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on November 6, 2000, Lewelling discusses his family background, including his family's involvement in the establishment of Oregon's first nursery. He talks about his early life in Albany, Oregon, including time he spent on the family farm, his brothers and sisters, and doing farm work. In the second interview session, conducted on November 13, 2000, Lewelling continues discussing his early life in Albany, Oregon, including time he spent on the family farm and doing farm work. He describes his childhood home and talks about his father, L. Guy Lewelling, and his father's career as a lawyer and judge. He then briefly talks about his high school education; his experience at Albany College, now known as Lewis and Clark College; and his experience at the Willamette University College of Law. He speaks at length about his Air Force service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including his flight training. In the third interview session, conducted on December 18, 2000, Lewelling continues discussing his Air Force service during World War II, and talks about his discharge and return to the United States in 1946. He discusses his return to the practice of law in Salem. He talks about his law partners; some of the cases he worked on, particularly those involving insurance claims; and some of the judges he argued before. He also briefly talks about his involvement with the Detroit Athletic Club. In the fourth interview session, conducted on January 8, 2001, Lewelling continues discussing cases he worked on, particularly those involving insurance claims, and judges he argued before. He talks about his service as president of the Oregon State Bar in 1973, how the practice of law has changed during his career, and the different fields of law practice. He then discusses purchasing land, and forming and operating Green Villa Farms. In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on January 15, 2001, he continues discussing Green Villa Farms, and talks about the sale of the farm in 1978. He also talks about his other real estate investments, his hobbies, and his ongoing interest in farming, particularly tomatoes. He describes his marriage history and talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by sharing his most outstanding memories.

Lewelling, Asa L. (Asa Lorenzo), 1915-2007

Oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Katherine Huff O’Neil was conducted by Patricia Wlodarczyk from November 3, 2000, to May 9, 2001. At O'Neil's request sections of sessions 2 and 3 of the interview were redacted by the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Historical Society. In addition to the interview, the collection includes a digital photograph album in PDF format containing photographs of O’Neil’s family, friends, and colleagues. All but two of the digital photographs used to create the album are also included in JPEG format.

In this interview, O’Neil discusses her family background and early life in New Orleans, Louisiana, including her early education, family vacations, and race relations in the South. She talks about studying political science at Stanford University, including her social life and her year studying abroad at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. She then briefly discusses her involvement with the Republican Party and working for the Young Republicans in Washington, D.C. She talks about studying law at Harvard University, including her experience as a female student, as well as meeting Mike O’Neil and their subsequent marriage. She talks about raising a family; relocating to Tigard, Oregon, in 1964; and working as a correspondent for the Community Press and the Oregonian newspaper. She discusses studying law at Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, including her fellow law students.

O’Neil discusses practicing law in Portland. She talks about her first job with a law firm and sexist attitudes she faced as a woman lawyer, as well as racist attitudes she observed in her fellow lawyers. She talks about her fellow lawyers, judges she argued before, and some of the cases she worked on, particularly regarding admiralty law. She describes each of the law firms she worked for during her career. She also talks about trips to China in 1983 and 1985; her involvement in the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers; and serving as a pro-tem judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court. She discusses her plans for retirement; her children and their careers and their families; and serving on the American Bar Association House of Delegates. She also speaks about her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. She talks about changes in the law profession and her role in the investigation of U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. O’Neil closes the interview by discussing people who influenced her to pursue a career as a lawyer.

O'Neil, Katherine Huff, 1938-

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