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Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of USS Constitution

Half-length portrait of Commander Louis J. Gulliver facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933, when Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, inspected the moorage at Swan Island prior to a visit by the frigate and crew in August as part of a national tour. With Gulliver were Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler (background, left), the ship’s navigating officer, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. A story, headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here,” and related image No. 371N3715 were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933.

Group at tea during visit of USS Constitution to Portland

Portrait of the commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, members of his family, and others at a tea on Friday, August 18, 1933. The tea was held during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and its crew. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Group at Friday tea, in front row from left are Phylis Drake and Grace Gulliver and in rear row Marion Bass, Commander [Louis J.] Gulliver, Mrs. Gulliver and Marjorie Bass.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding a bronze plaque commemorating the visit of the frigate USS Constitution to Portland. The photograph was taken during a ceremony aboard the frigate on Thursday, August 10, 1933, in which Carson presented the plaque to the ship’s executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (second from right). Several unidentified men are watching Carson; the man at left may be City Commissioner Earl Riley. A story about the presentation, headlined “City Presents Bronze Plaque to ‘Ironsides,’ ” was published in the Oregon Journal the day of the ceremony. See related image Nos. 371N3728 and 371N3729.

Earl Riley, Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) Earl Riley, Oregon first lady Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at the dedication of the new Waverly Baby Home building in Portland on November 28, 1931. They are standing in front of the building’s cornerstone, which has not yet been placed, and Meier is holding a bouquet of flowers. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3021 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “From left, Earl Riley, city commissioner; Mrs. Julius L. Meier receiving bouquet from L. E. Kern, president of the board of trustees of the Waverly Baby home, and State Treasurer Rufus C. Holman, at the dedication of the new $115,000 home for parentless waifs Saturday. Riley represented the city and Holmes for the state.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Wedding of Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick

Photograph showing bride Myrtle Cradick and groom Joseph K. Carson, mayor of Portland, with their attendants at the end of their wedding ceremony on Saturday, June 19, 1937. The ceremony was held at the First Baptist Church in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 372A0110 were published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, June 20, 1937, under the headline “—And May They Live Happily Ever After.” This photograph had the following caption: “Members of the bridal party at the White Temple Saturday night, when Miss Myrtle Cradick became the bride of Mayor Joseph K. Carson.” To the left of the bride is Myrtle Cradick's sister, maid of honor Ethel Cradick. Her other attendants were Carson’s sister, Mrs. Elwyn Van DeWalker; Kathleen Furlong; Mavis Melvin; and Ruth Morris. To the right of the groom is Joseph K. Carson’s brother, best man James Carson. The Rev. William G. Everson (at rear left, behind bridesmaids) officiated, and Will A. Knight (at rear right) gave Cradick away. In addition to the photographs on Page 3, the Journal published two pictures and a story on the June 20 front page. See additional related image Nos. 372A0108, 372A0109, 372A0111, 372A0112, and 372A0113.

Wedding of Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick

Photograph showing Myrtle Cradick and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson at their wedding on Saturday, June 19, 1937. The ceremony was held at the First Baptist Church (also known as the White Temple) in Portland. The man at right is unidentified. A front-page story and related photographs from the wedding were published in the Oregon Journal on Sunday, June 20, 1937. See related image Nos. 372A0107, 372A0108, 372A0110, 372A0111, 372A0112, and 372A0113.

Wedding of Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick

Photograph of Myrtle Cradick, the Rev. William G. Everson, and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson at the altar on Cradick and Carson’s wedding day, Saturday, June 19, 1937. The ceremony was held at the First Baptist Church (also known as the White Temple) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 372A0112 were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, June 20, 1937, under the headline “The Mayor and Portland Gain First Lady.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Rev. William G. Everson, pastor of White Temple church, blesses the union of Mayor Joseph K. Carson and Miss Myrtle Cradick at the wedding rites Saturday night.” See additional related image Nos. 372A0107, 372A0108, 372A0109, 372A0110, and 372A0111.

Joseph K. Carson wearing bib at bachelor party

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson taking a glass from two unidentified men as a third unidentified man watches. The photograph was taken on June 15, 1937, during a bachelor party for Carson at Waverley Country Club in Portland. Carson is sitting in a tall chair and wearing a bib. The dinner party included speeches and pranks. The Oregon Journal published a story about the party on Page 6, of the June 16, 1937 edition. The story was headlined “Gifts and Wisecracks Give Hizzoner Merry Old Time.” Carson married Myrtle Cradick on June 19, 1937. See related image No. 372A0115.

George H. Himes and group with plaque at Portland park renamed in Himes’ honor

Full-length portrait showing George H. Himes (third from right) and five others standing next to a boulder bearing a plaque in Himes’ honor on Friday, September 20, 1935, in Portland. The photograph was taken at a ceremony marking the official placement of the plaque. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 7 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, September 22, 1935, under the headline “Himes Park Plaque Put at Entrance.” The story reported: “Official viewing of a bronze plaque affixed to a 10-ton boulder at the entrance to George H. Himes park Friday afternoon marked the culmination of a long campaign by the Oregon chapter, Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, to have the 34-acre tract renamed for a living pioneer. The organization May 18 conducted a program in the park, marking the change in name from Fulton park, but the plaque, paying tribute to Himes, was not permanently in place.” The story also reported that Himes had come to Oregon in 1853 and had long been the curator of the Oregon Historical Society. Accompanying the story was a cropped version of this photograph, which had the headline “Placing Permanent Himes Plaque.” The photograph had the following caption: “Grouped beside the new name plaque, mounted on a 10-ton boulder in George H. Himes park, are (from left) Mrs. O. J Goffin, chairman of the Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America committee which renamed the park for Himes; Mrs. J. B. Montgomery, a Portland pioneer; Mrs. C. S. Jackson, who read the inscription at a program in the park Friday; Himes; Mrs. J. Thorburn Ross, president of the daughters group, and David Stearns, another Oregon pioneer." See related image No. 372A0281. Image note: The name “Himes” is written on the negative. Negative damage at bottom left corner.

Firefighters climbing to roof of building at Second and Pine, Portland

Photograph showing fire trucks parked outside a building on Pine Street at Second in Portland (now Southwest Pine Street and Southwest Second Avenue). A ladder extends from one of the trucks to the roof of the building, and several firefighters are carrying a hose up the ladder. Two more men are standing on the roof of the building. A related photograph, image No. 373G458, was published on Page 7 of a special year-end section in the Oregon Journal on Saturday, December 27, 1913. That photograph was one of seven published under the headline “Portland Affords Adequate Protection Against Fire.” The photographs accompanied a story about the expansion and cost of the fire department and the number of fire alarms in 1913. Also see additional related image No. 373G0456. Image note: The number 120 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. The number 132 was also written on the negative, then crossed out.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Half-length portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name “Bill Genn” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Prohibition agents S. F. Rutter, and J. P. Marstella in Portland

Photograph showing Federal Prohibition Field Agents S. F. Rutter of San Francisco and J. P. Marstella of Washington, D.C., standing at the bottom of a set of steps outside a building. They are looking at one another and smiling. This photograph was taken in March 1920 while Rutter and Marstella were visiting Portland to evaluate prohibition enforcement. The Oregon Journal published a related photograph, image No. 376G0193, and a story about Rutter and Marstella’s visit on Page 4 of the city edition on March 16, 1920. See additional related image No. 376G0191. Image note: Negative damage at upper right. The text “Prohibition officers” is written on the negative sleeve.

Prohibition agents Fred B. Curry, Johnson S. Smith, J. E. Flanders, S. F. Rutter, and J. P. Marstella in Portland

Photograph showing a group of men, all wearing suits and ties, gathered at the bottom of steps outside a building. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Tuesday, March 16, 1920, under the headline “Prohibition Agents Visit Portland.” The caption was: “Special prohibition field agents visit officials who are directing enforcement of national prohibition act in Oregon. From left—Federal Prohibition Inspector Fred B. Curry, Federal Prohibition Supervisor for Oregon Johnson S. Smith, Federal prohibition Agent J. E. Flanders and S. F. Rutter of San Francisco and J. P. Marstella of Washington, D. C., special prohibition agents touring the Pacific coast. The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Dry Nation Has Come To Stay, Officials Say,” about Rutter and Marstella’s visit to Portland. See related image Nos. 376G0191 and 376G0192. Image note: The text “Prohibition office” is written on the negative sleeve.

Customers and police officer outside closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing unidentified customers and a police officer outside the Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. At left, an unidentified man is walking past as a second unidentified man speaks to a police officer who is standing in front of the doorway to the bank. A similar photograph, image No. 373G0336, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 27, 1920, under the headline “Bond Purchasers Wait; Etheridge Flees.” The photograph had the following caption: “Some of the customers of Morris Brothers, Inc., who gathered at the iron barred door today and tried to gain admittance to ascertain the status of their investments. The police moved on them unceremoniously whenever the crowd got too large.” The photograph accompanied a story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See additional related image Nos. 376G0016 and 376G0018.

Augusta Carlson, witness at murder trial of John Cyril Liard

Three-quarters portrait of a woman, Augusta Carlson, sitting in a chair, facing slightly right, with her hands folded in her lap. She is wearing a hat, fur-trimmed jacket, and dress or skirt. The text “Carlson, Miss,” is written on the negative sleeve. Carlson was a witness in the trial of John Cyril Liard, who was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that Carlson had told police she was in the car. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0331, of Liard, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein's court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Suspect George Billings, alias Joe Brady, at Multnomah County jail

Half-length portrait of George Billings facing front and smiling at the Multnomah County Jail. Billings was a suspect in a burglary case. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, January 27, 1921, under the headline “Held On Crime Charges.” The photograph had the following caption: “George Billings, alias Joe Brady, photographed in cell at county jail this morning, after refusal of Captain Harry Circle of police detective department to allow such picture taken Wednesday in the city jail, despite orders from Chief Jenkins that photographers be allowed to pose prisoner. Brady was affable and chatty making no objection to flashlight.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Brady Says He’s Goat; 2 Identify Him.” On Sunday, March 5, 1921, the Journal reported that a grand jury had indicted Billings on three charges. Subsequently, on Friday, April 15, 1921, the Journal reported that a jury had acquitted Billings of one charge and the other two indictments had been dismissed. Image note: The text “Brady, Joe / Billings” is written on the negative sleeve.

George Rossman in court on first day as Portland municipal judge

Photograph, taken from the side, showing Portland Municipal Judge George Rossman seated at the bench in a courtroom on Wednesday, August 1, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 14 of the Oregon Journal that day. The photograph had the headline “Succeeds To Municipal Bench” and the caption: “George Rossman, who began duties this morning laid down by John H. Stevenson.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Municipal Judge And New Chief Of Police Occupy Their Posts.” Image note: The text “Rossman, municipal judge / & courtroom - Portland” is written on the negative sleeve.

John B. Kawacinski, killer of Harry I. Pawluk, at Multnomah County Jail

Head and shoulders portrait of a man at the Multnomah County Jail. He is sitting in a chair and facing to the right. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, March 7, 1921, under the headline “Slayer Of His Shipmate.” The photograph had the following caption: “John Boleslaw Kawacinski, known also as John Bruno, who has confessed to the killing of Harry I. Pawluk, second cook on the steamship Montague, arrested at Seattle Saturday and now being held in the Multnomah county jail while real facts of grim story of debt, smuggling, and intrigue are being straightened out by the authorities.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Murderer of Pawluk Views Crime Scene” and the subheading “John Kawacinski, Who Confessed He Killed Shipmate on Barnes Road, Pleads Self-Defense; Police Look for Woman in Case.” On Thursday, April 14, 1921, the Journal reported that Kawacinski had been convicted of second-degree murder, and on Monday, April 18, 1921, the paper reported that he had been sentenced to life in the Oregon State Penitentiary. Image note: The text “Bruno, John / Murderer of Pawluk” is written on the negative sleeve.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish

Photograph showing dining room crime scene in the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered while playing solitaire at his table and was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish's killing. See image No. 371N3518, which may also have been taken in Mish’s home after his death.

Rita Johnston

Head and shoulders portrait of a smiling young woman or teenage girl. She is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland, facing right and looking slightly left. She is wearing a coat and scarf and carrying a violin case. The name “Rita Lorrain [sic] Johnston” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image. See related image No. 371N1353.

Dr. Mack, Milk Department, City Hall

Half-length portrait of a man sitting at a desk in an office. He is looking downward and is holding a pen over a book on the desk in front of him. He is wearing glasses, a suit jacket and vest, a collared shirt, and a tie. The name “Mack, Dr.” and the text “Milk Dept, City Hall” are written on the negative sleeve. The man is probably Dr. D. W. Mack, a veterinarian and milk inspector for the city of Portland.

Yōsuke Matsuoka after arrival at Union Station, Portland

Photograph showing Yōsuke Matsuoka outside Union Station after he arrived in Portland on Friday, April 7, 1933. Matsuoka, who had led the Japanese delegation to the League of Nations, was on his way back to Japan from Geneva following his delegation’s withdrawal from the league in February 1933. A cropped version of this photograph and a story about his arrival were published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on April 7, 1933. The story, headlined “Matsuoka Comes Back As Diplomat,” reported that in his youth, Matsuoka had lived in Portland twice; he first arrived in 1893 and later attended the University of Oregon Law School. This photograph was one of three that accompanied the story. The photographs were published under the headline “Portland’s Japanese School Boy of 1893.” This photograph had the following caption: “Yosuke Matsuoka, 37 years after he graduated from Atkinson grade school.” See related image No. 371N1642. Also see image Nos. 371N0218, 371N0219, 371N0220, 371N0221, and 371N3037, taken later in Matsuoka’s visit to Portland. Image note: The name “Matsauko [sic] is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Worker marking a board during graveyard shift, Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland

Full-length portrait of an unidentified worker at the Albina Engine & Machine Works shipyard in Portland. The worker is facing right and looking toward the front. He is leaning over a stack of boards and marking the end of one. A saw is lying next to him on the stack. The number 160 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. Information based on the following unverified note written on the negative sleeve: “Albina shipbuilding / Graveyard crew / 10/15/42.”

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