Showing 210 results

Collections
Only top-level descriptions
Print preview View:

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Broadside of Western Defense Command instructions to all persons of Japanese ancestry

  • Coll 619
  • Collection
  • 1942-05

The collection consists of a broadside detailing the provisions of Civilian Exclusion Order No. 46 issued by General J. L. Dewitt on May 6, 1942. The order directs all Japanese and Japanese Americans living in Clackamas and eastern Multnomah counties to be evacuated to Civil Control Stations for forced incarceration during World War II.

United States. Army. Western Defense Command

William L. Finley photographs, 1901-1940

  • Org. Lot 369
  • Collection
  • 1901 - 1940

Images of wildlife, primarily birds of the western United States, c.1900-1940s, photographed by William Lovell Finley and his associate Herman T. Bohlman, with the help of his wife, Nellie Irene Barnhart Finley and others. The collection includes fine images of adult and immature birds, chicks, eggs, and nests. Many show habitat. Others document the camera equipment and techniques used to make the photographs.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

William L. Finley letters and scrapbook, 1946-1962

  • Mss 2654
  • Collection
  • 1946 - 1962

Collection includes: Scrapbook and letters, 1 vol. and 1 folder, 1946-1962, regarding personal matters, the Izaak Walton League, conservation, etc.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Stella Maris House collection, 1940-1973; bulk : 1960-1972

  • Mss 1585
  • Collection
  • 1940 - 1973

Ranging in date from 1940 to 1973, the Stella Maris House Collection consists of printed material, correspondence, and administrative, financial, and legal records created and collected by the Portland, Oregon-based social justice group during the course of their work. The collection demonstrates the local evolution of social issues key to the history of the United States during the 1960s. Over a third of the archive's content is dedicated to Oregon's migrant labor rights movement, and it also features records documenting the area's civil rights movement, urban renewal projects, interstate highway infrastructure, and social welfare programs initiated by the Economic Opportunity Act.

The bulk of the collection consists of printed material created by a number of local and national organizations between 1960 and 1972, then collected by the Stella Maris House. This portion of the archive includes programs, reports, studies, surveys, correspondence, brochures, and flyers generated by civil rights, migrant rights, and peace movement groups. Items of note include the Albina Neighborhood Improvement Project's plans for urban redevelopment (Series B), an African-American employment survey conducted by the Metropolitan Interfaith Commission on Race (Series E), and records documenting the Housing Authority of Portland (Series I). The collection also features printed material created by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Series E), the Valley Migrant League (Series J), and the United Farm Workers (Series J). Newspaper clippings that document events important to social justice movements constitute a substantial part of the collection.

A small but significant portion of the collection was created by the staff members of the Stella Maris House; it includes notes by the staff documenting the meetings of local groups. These meeting notes often provide remarkably candid insights into the workings of area groups. Additionally, Stella Maris House staff members also contributed group and program histories to the collection.

Stella Maris House (Portland, Or.)

Monteith family photograph collection, 1847-1854

  • Org. Lot 1388
  • Collection
  • 1847 - 1854

This collection is comprised of two (2) daguerreotypes showing portraits of brothers Thomas and Walter Monteith, who founded the town of Albany, Oregon, circa 1849. They traveled to Oregon from New York in 1847 and settled adjacent land claims, sharing a house which straddled the two claims.

Photographs of Vanport, Oregon, circa 1948

  • Org. Lot 1364
  • Collection
  • 1942 - 1948

Photographs of Vanport, Oregon before and after the flood of 1948, including images of Dale Skovgaard and his family, who lived there at the time.

Skovgaard, Dale

Vanport flood photographs collection, 1948

  • Org. Lot 131
  • Collection
  • 1948

Photographs of the aftermath of the flood that destroyed Vanport, Or. on May 30, 1948. The images depict the damage to buildings, bridges, roadways, and other structures in both Vanport and Portland, Or. Includes postcards and snapshots, as well as photographs taken by the Camera Art Studio of Portland, Or.

Camera Art Studio (Portland, Or.)

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Collection
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

Oregon Legislature Oral History Series

  • SR Oregon Legislature Oral History Series
  • Collection
  • 1984 - 2011

This set of interviews was primarily done as part of a decade-long project. They are with primarily state officials, including: senators, representatives, secretaries of state, treasurers, and governors, who held office mostly between 1960 and 1998.

Interviewees include: Victor Atiyeh, the first Arab American Governor in the United States; Maurine Neuberger, Oregon’s first and only female state senator; Clay Myers, Oregon Secretary of State and State Treasurer, and a leader in Land-Use planning; and Monroe Sweetland, a native Oregonian who was politically active across the nation.

The Bo's'n's Whistle

  • BW-OSC
  • Collection
  • 1941 - 1946

The Bo's'n's Whistle was a publication distributed to the employees of the Kaiser Shipyards in Oregon and Washington between 1941 and 1946. The first publication was released on July 18, 1941 under the editorial direction of Chick Johnson, and was given its distinctive name by Edgar Kaiser the General Manager of the shipyard. Subsequent issues released bi-weekly, along with a special issue on September 27, 1941 commemorating the launch of the "Star of Oregon". Distribution expanded to the Vancouver and Swan Island Shipyards in April 1942, with Hal Babbit, director of public relations for Kaiser Company serving as editorial supervisor.

The format of the Bo's'n's Whistle changed from a magazine to a weekly newspaper beginning March 10, 1944, with separate editions for each of the three shipyards - Oregon Shipyard, Swan Island, and Vancouver. On September 7, 1945 The Bo's'n's Whistle was again consolidated into one edition for all three shipyards, and on January 1, 1946 it was moved to a twice-monthly publication schedule. The final issue of The Bo's'n's Whistle was published on May 24, 1946. At its peak, The Bo's'n's Whistle was circulated to 90,000 employees, with over 4,000,000 copies distributed over its lifespan.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Russell Peyton

  • SR 473
  • Collection
  • 1987-07-28 - 1987-08-12

This interview with Russell Peyton was conducted by Dan Malone at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from July 28 to August 12, 1987. In the interview, Peyton discusses his family history and early life in Virginia. He also discusses his early jobs, including working as an assistant to a Chinese diplomat. He then talks about going to California and working in service stations, where he got involved in a lawsuit against the Shell Oil company. Peyton then discusses attending the University of Oklahoma and confronting his own racism. In talking about the lead-up to World War II, he discusses coming to Oregon and working for the Kaiser shipyards and his impressions of Portland. He then talks about a trip he took to Europe shortly after the end of the war. Peyton discusses his involvement with the Urban League and his work toward integration, particularly on housing discrimination. He also discusses the different forms that racism took in the North and South. He then talks about his work as an investigator for the Civil Rights Division of the Oregon State Bureau of Labor, detailing many of his cases. Peyton discusses his work with the Joint Council on Social Welfare and the legislation they lobbied for. He also discusses the achievements of the Oregon Prison Association; working with Portland General Electric to cease cutting off power to people who couldn't pay their bills in winter; and school busing. Peyton discusses his time as executive director of the Metropolitan Human Relations Commission, including affirmative action policies, working to improve the Portland police, food security, pay equality, and employment discrimination. He also discusses working with the Portland City Council and the Metro government. In addition, he talks briefly about Vietnam War protests in Portland. Peyton talks often about Edwin "Bill" C. Berry of the Urban League, as well as other leaders in Portland's black community. He then briefly describes each winner of the Russell Peyton Award from its inception to 1987. Peyton also talks about the numerous humanitarian organizations whose boards he served on after retirement. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments in civil rights.

Peyton, Russell A. (Russell Ackerman), 1903-1996

Oregonian glass negatives

  • Org Lot 139
  • Collection
  • 1850-1930

This collection consists of glass negatives taken by photographers for the Portland, Oregon based newspaper, The Oregonian. Most of the photographs in this collection are undated but the bulk of the photographs are believed to be taken between 1890 and 1920.

Oregonian (Firm)

Charles McNary speech accepting vice presidential nomination

  • SR 1182
  • Collection
  • 1940-08-27

This speech was given by Charles McNary in Salem, Oregon, on August 27, 1940. In the speech, McNary accepts the nomination of the Republican Party for the office of vice president. He praises the policies and personality of the Republican presidential candidate, Wendell Willkie. He also discusses the New Deal and expounds upon Willkie’s plans to change the direction of the country. He shares the history of Oregon, describing its people, landscape, and resources, particularly the emigrants who came across the Oregon Trail. McNary discusses the factors that have affected the American economy in the early 20th century and touches upon the Republican plan to improve the economy, particularly for farmers, and how the plan differs from the programs of the New Deal. He speaks at length about the Republican Party platform of 1940, and the looming specter of World War II.

McNary, Charles Linza, 1874-1944

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

  • SR 1249
  • Collection
  • 1981-03-19 - 1981-03-19

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Linda Dodds in Frye's chambers in Portland, Oregon, on March 19, 1981. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Klamath County, Oregon. She talks about the difficult experience of a huge change in her family situation as a child, when she was reunited with her mother and brother after having been raised entirely by her grandparents. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including influential professors, and meeting and marrying William Frye. She talks about raising a family and how postpartum depression drove her to start her teaching career. She also discusses her involvement in politics, including William Frye's political campaigns. She then talks about attending the University of Oregon law school in 1963, including other women in her class, balancing family life, and starting to practice law.

She describes becoming a judge for the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall and her later campaign. She talks about how her gender affected the way defendants perceived her. She also discusses how this new position affected her marriage and her divorce in 1975. She talks briefly about serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She closes the interview by discussing her current family life in 1981 and her plans for the future.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Soap Creek Valley History Project

  • SR Soap Creek Valley History Project
  • Collection
  • 1989

The Soap Creek Valley History Project Oral Histories consist of oral histories conducted primarily in 1989-1991 by the Oregon State University Research Forests to better understand the history, ecology, and culture of the Soap Creek Valley in Benton County, Oregon.

Oral history interview with Dorothy Thornton, by Nancy Hawver

  • SR 1076
  • Collection
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

Thornton discusses her family background, her father's involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association, her childhood and education, her art and art collecting, her husband, Robert Y. Thornton, a trip to Europe in the 1930s, the Depression, high school sports, Bob's political career, her involvement in the creation of the Tillamook County Library, raising a family, their activities during World War II, and her involvement in various art organizations.

Thornton, Dorothy, 1913-2005

The Immigrant Story Oral Histories

  • SR TIS
  • Collection
  • 2017 - 2020

The Immigrant Story is a private non-profit organization created by Sankar Raman in 2017 with the mission "to document, narrate, and curate the stories of immigrants in order to enhance empathy and help promote an inclusive community." Its goal is to both advance the national dialogue and to dispel myths about new Americans through strong, thoughtful narratives.

Raman, Sankar

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28 - 1982-07-02

This oral history interview with Howard Hobson was conducted by Linda S. Dodds from June 28 to July 2, 1982, at Hobson's home in Portland, Oregon. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hobson discusses his early life in Portland, including his interest in athletics. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, particularly his involvement in college sports. He discusses studying at Columbia University in New York, New York, including his social life, playing local sports, and returning to Portland. He speaks at length about his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at the University of Oregon. He also briefly talks about his reasons for leaving Oregon to coach at Yale University, his work on the Olympic committee, and working for Ronald Press Publishing Company in New York. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the game of basketball, his writing projects, and awards he has received.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Lily E. White negatives

  • Org. Lot 1415
  • Collection
  • 1900-1915

Collection consists of negatives from the estate of Lily E. White. They are attributed to White but some of the photographs were possibly taken by Sarah Hall Ladd. The photographs date from approximately 1900-1915. Topical highlights in the collection include landscape views of the Columbia River Gorge, Garden scenes and flower photographs taken at the home of Charles Elliott Ladd and Sarah Hall Ladd, and interior and exterior views of Lily E. Whites’ houseboat, The Raysark. Also included in the collection are photographs and scrapbook pages taken during trips to Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, and along the coast near Carmel, California.

White, Lily E.

Oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler

  • SR 44-1
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-27

This oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler was conducted at the home of Peggy Wetzler. The first session was conducted by Bernice Pluchos of the Camas-Washougal Historical Society on February 27, 1981, and the second session was conducted by Peggy Wetzler on February 28, 1981. The sound quality is extremely poor.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 27, 1981, Dalton discusses her family background and early life on Government Island, Oregon, including life on the family ranch, transportation, and her social life. She also briefly talks about her wedding to Louis Stanis Dalton in 1907. Wetzler also discusses her family background and early life in Long Beach, Washington.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 28, 1981, Dalton continues discussing her early life on Government Island, including her education, other families that lived on the island, and floods. She also describes the house she lived in. Wetzler and Dalton talk about taking ferry boats to and from Government Island, catching crabs on the beach, and life in Long Beach, Washington. Wetzler closes the tape with a brief narrative of Rose Iva Dalton's family history and additional historical information about Government Island and Long Beach.

Dalton, Rose Iva, 1881-1984

Oral history interview with Clara May Patterson

  • SR 44
  • Collection
  • 1980-06-11

This oral history interview with Clara May Patterson was conducted by Mary Cowan and Ruth Kinon on June 11, 1980. The interviewers are not identified in the audio, so their names are inferred from the handwriting on the physical audiocassette.

In this interview, Patterson describes her experience singing in the choir at the Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905. She then discusses her family background and early life in Camas, Washington, including the medical career of her father, Theophilius C. Humphrey, and the houses her family lived in. She then talks about her later life in Portland, Oregon, including raising a family. She closes the interview by describing the overland journey of the Humphrey family from Iowa to Oregon in 1852.

Patterson, Clara May, 1882-1982

Oral history interview with Marjorie McDonald, by Edna Kovacs

  • SR 6502
  • Collection
  • 1989-10-21

McDonald discusses her family background and early life in Indiana and Portland, Oregon, her poetry, learning and teaching Russian, living in London for a year,and her collage artwork.

McDonald, Marjorie

Oral history interview with Dr. Wilbert Todd, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9134
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-29

Dr. Todd discusses his early life and education in Wisconsin, his interest in science, funding research, and his career at the University of Oregon Medical School.

Todd, Wilbert R. (Wilbert Remington)

Results 113 to 140 of 210