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Oral history interview with Clay Myers

This oral history interview with Clay Myers was conducted by Ellen Nesbitt from October 9-10, 1997. In this interview, Myers discusses his terms as Oregon secretary of state from 1967 to 1977, as well as his term as Oregon treasurer from 1977 to 1984. He discusses his main accomplishments in those offices, including working with Tom McCall in the creation of the Willamette Greenway and SB 100, Oregon's landmark land-use planning legislation, as well as his role in bringing Intel to Oregon. Myers then discusses his involvement in the Episcopal Church, including the changes in the church since he first joined as a teenager in the 1940s, particularly on the subjects of the inclusion of women clergy in 1976, birth control, and views on homosexuality. He speaks at length about the evolution of his own views on LGBTQ people.

Myers, Clay, 1927-2004

Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

Bell, Frankie (Frances Estelle), 1937-

Oral history interview with F. Leo Smith

This oral history interview with F. Leo Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 23 to October 28, 1993. In this interview, Smith discusses the history of the Ku Klux Klan and anti-Catholic sentiment in Oregon. He then discusses the policies of the Democratic Party in the early 20th century, particularly in Oregon, and his involvement with the party. He describes his early law career in private practice during the Depression. He talks about his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1944, including his campaigns, constituency, and committee assignments. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on in the House, particularly a bill on textbooks in public schools that was later overturned by the Oregon Supreme Court. He then discusses his brief term as Multnomah County district attorney, from 1957 to 1958, and the many vice cases he prosecuted. He also talks about his involvement with the Catholic Church as a member, lawyer, and lobbyist. He discusses his later career as a lobbyist, particularly his work on establishing the Public Employees Retirement System while lobbying for the Oregon State Employees Association, and in defeating a bill on abortion while lobbying for the Archdiocese of Portland. He closes the interview by talking about the changes in society over the 20th century.

Smith, F. Leo (Frank Leo)

Oral history interview with L. Jean Markham

This oral history interview with L. Jean Markham was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on May 8, 1997. In this interview, Markham discusses her family background and early life in Washington, including her memories of the Depression and her high school education. She then talks about her experiences at a small community college and the University of Washington; her early political beliefs; and her relationship with William Edwin Markham, whom she married in 1943. She discusses starting a family and moving to Riddle, Oregon, in 1947; having polio when she was very young; her children's education; and her involvement in the Riddle community.

Markham discusses entering Republican politics with her husband, his service in the Oregon House of Representatives, and particularly her own work as his secretary. She describes the secretary orientation session, other legislative secretaries, and the expectations for freshman legislators. She describes her duties as a legislative secretary, including editing legislation by hand and handling correspondence, as well as her duties as a legislative aide. She also talks about the social lives of legislative secretaries, partisanship in the Legislature, and misconceptions the public has about the workings of Oregon government. She discusses Bill Markham's constituency, his position on several issues, and his temperament. She also talks about campaigning. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for retirement.

Markham, L. Jean (Lotus Jean), 1922-1998

Oral History Interview with Art S. Bimrose Jr., by Jim Strassmaier

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26

This is an interview done in conjunction with a 1989 OHS exhibit of Bimrose's work. In the interview, he discusses his childhood and education, his early art career during the Depression, the process of creating cartoons, the cartoonist's intellectual autonomy, politics and his feelings on war.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry

This oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Ashland, Oregon, from July 23-24, 1990. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life, mostly in Eastern Oregon and northeastern Washington. He talks about working on and running the family orchard, Newbry Orchards. He then discusses his involvement in local politics in Jackson County, Oregon. He talks about his legislative career in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1942 and in the Oregon Senate from 1943 to 1948, including his campaigns; balancing work and family; lobbyists; and his constituency. He also discusses many of his fellow legislators, including William McAllister, Truman Chase, and Eugene Marsh. He talks about legislation he worked on, including on labor, transportation, and taxes. He then discusses being secretary of state from 1949 to 1955, as well as his 1954 run for the governor's office. He discusses the duties of the secretary of state, including overseeing the Department of Motor Vehicles. He also talks about being a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1954 and his involvement with the Republican Party. He then discusses Oregon governors and legislators who served after he left politics, and reflects on his own accomplishments. He closes the interview by talking about his family, particularly his son, Lynn Newbry, and his political career.

Newbry, Earl T., 1900-1995

Oral history interview with Bob Straub

This oral history interview with Bob Straub was conducted by Clark Hansen at Straub's home near Salem, Oregon, from May 14 to June 17, 1991. Pat Straub was also present. In this interview, Straub discusses his family background and early life in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. He then discusses attending Dartmouth College; meeting his wife, Pat Stroud; and serving in World War II. He then talks about running his own business as a building contractor in Springfield, Oregon; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and getting into politics by running for Lane County commissioner in 1954. He discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1959 to 1962, including his campaign and constituency. He also discusses his fellow legislators, including Charles Porter, Alfred Corbett, and Howell Appling. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on taxes. He talks about working with prominent politicians while chairman of the Democratic Party in Oregon, including Monroe Sweetland; serving on the Board of Control; and serving as state treasurer from 1965 to 1973 under Governor Tom McCall. He then discusses ranching in the years before he served as governor. He discusses his 1974 campaign for governor against Vic Atiyeh; his staff, particularly Stafford Hansell; and administrative and judicial appointments he made, including appointing Ron Wyden to the Nursing Board, Wally Carson to the Marion County Circuit Court, and Betty Roberts to the appellate court. He also discusses his working relationship with the Legislature. He talks about many of the issues he dealt with as governor. He speaks briefly about his involvement in the creation of the Willamette Greenway. He then speaks briefly about several national and state politicians, including President Jimmy Carter, U.S. Senator Wayne Morse, and congressman Bob Duncan. He closes the interview by discussing his family life and activities since leaving politics.

Straub, Robert W.

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

This oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland was conducted by Andrew Bryans on March 16, 2002. In this interview, Sweetland discusses his family background and early life, including his childhood in rural Michigan; his early involvement in Democratic politics; and his experiences at Cornell University. He discusses his political activism during college, including his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy and his political activism on behalf of Socialist candidates. Sweetland also discusses his political activities after his return to Oregon in 1935, including his work with the Oregon Commonwealth Federation and his decision to leave the Socialist Party and join the Democratic Party. Also discussed is his work with labor unions; the New Deal programs; and his work with the Oregon Democratic Party. He briefly talks about World War II and its effect on Oregon politics, particularly the effect the Hitler-Stalin pact had on American communists and the Oregon Commonwealth Federation; internment of Japanese-Americans; and his own pacifism.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with James K. Weatherford, Jr.

This oral history interview with James K. Weatherford was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Weatherford's office in Albany, Oregon, from August 15 to September 5, 1991. In the interview, Weatherford discusses his family background and early life in Corvallis, Oregon. He talks about studying civil engineering at Oregon Agricultural College, including spending a summer in 1923 surveying for railroads in Alaska. He then talks about studying law at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., including his cross-country drive in 1924, and then at the University of Oregon. He briefly discusses the political and legal career of his grandfather, James K. Weatherford, for whom he was named. He discusses his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1931 to 1934, including his campaigns and his involvement with the Democratic Party. He briefly talks about his wife, Margaret Cartwright, and her family background. He goes on to talk about legislation he worked on, his fellow legislators, and lobbyists. He discusses his constituency; government versus the private sector; his committee assignments; and the income tax legislation of 1931. He also talks about the labor movements of the 1930s; public power; law enforcement; and education. He shares his impressions of Oregon governors Julius Meier, John Hall, and Charles Sprague. He speaks at length about Prohibition, and legislation regarding alcohol after its repeal. He discusses his fellow legislators, including Dorothy McCullough Lee and Homer Angell. He also speaks about his own experience during the Depression. Weatherford talks about serving as Linn County district attorney from 1935 to 1937, particularly dealing with banks and foreclosing on homes and farms during the Depression. He closes the interview by talking about serving on the Albany and Union High School boards.

Weatherford, James K., Jr. (James Knox), 1901-1995

Oral history interview with Jean Young

This oral history interview with Jean Young was conducted by Linda Watkins from February 12 to March 25, 1988. In this interview, Young discusses her family background and early life in the area of Detroit, Michigan, and in Portland, Oregon. She discusses her education at the University of Oregon, her social life, and her study of romance languages. She also discusses meeting her husband, Frederic Young; his family background and early life; their courtship and wedding; and his career as a lawyer in Portland. She talks about raising her children and the dynamics of her marriage. She then discusses the effect the Depression and New Deal had on her political views. She describes her involvement with the Republican Party and her public service career, beginning with being a precinct committee member for Multnomah County from 1936 until 1967. She also shares stories about U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. She talks about as serving as secretary of the Oregon Republican State Central Committee from 1954 to 1960, and campaigning for Republican candidates. She also discusses the changes in Republican Party politics over the decades and the disenchantment many women began to feel about the party. She talks about several prominent Republican politicians, including President Richard Nixon, Barry Goldwater, Clay Myers, and Mark Hatfield. She also shares personal details of her family life. She talks about her role as presidential elector for the Republican Party, first in 1960, then from 1968 to the time of the interview. She also briefly discusses her current position as mayor of King City, Oregon. She describes the state of the Republican Party, both in Oregon and nationally, and her hopes for its future. She closes the interview by discussing her current activities and plans for retirement.

Young, Jean K. (Jean Kitts), 1904-1992

Oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart

This oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart was conducted by Clark Hansen in Eugene, Oregon, from October 29, 1992, to June 22, 1993. In this interview, Stewart discusses his family background and early life in logging camps in Lane County. He talks about his early education, working at Booth-Kelly lumber mill, and his experience during the Depression. He talks about studying forestry engineering at Oregon State University and working as a road locator for the U.S. Forest Service in the Willamette National Forest. He describes his Army service in during World War II, including his journey through North Africa and South Asia to reach China, where he spent much of the war. He briefly talks about the 1992 election, which had just occurred at the time of the interview. Stewart describes his return to civilian life in 1946, including working as an engineer for forestry companies. He also talks about meeting his wife, Dorothy Elizabeth McDonald, and their subsequent marriage in 1936. He gives a brief history of the lumber industry in Oregon; describes his 1946 purchase of Bohemia Lumber Company, which he refers to as Bohemia Mills, as well as the running of the company; and the 1991 sale of Bohemia Lumber Company to Willamette Industries.

Stewart discusses his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. He talks about his campaign and his support for term limits. He also describes the Order of the Antelope, as well as other fraternal organizations he was involved with. He talks about his committee assignments, his fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on, particularly regarding taxation and forestry. He discusses the administration of Governor Paul Patterson; working with lobbyists; and interacting with his constituents. He also discusses his 1956 re-election loss.

Stewart talks about his activities since leaving elected office. He discusses serving as president of Bohemia Lumber Company. He speaks at length about the growth of the company, as well as the forestry products industry. He talks about the increasing environmental movement during the 1980s and how that affected the business. He also discusses serving on the State Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee. He then reflects on Oregon legislators who served after his legislative service. He closes the interview by talking a little about his recreational activities and social life.

Stewart, Loran LaSells, 1911-2005

Oral history interview with George F. Wingard

This oral history interview with George F. Wingard was conducted by Clark Hansen at Wingard's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16 to December 9, 1993. Wingard's dog was present and is audible throughout the interview. In this interview, Wingard discusses his family background and early life in Lakeview, Oregon, including his early education. He talks about witnessing his father's death from a heart attack in 1949. He talks about studying pre-med at the University of Oregon and transferring to Oregon State College (now Oregon State University) to study engineering. He discusses his learning disability and his struggle with his studies. He discusses his marriage to Rhea Henault. Wingard then speaks at length about running a construction business in Eugene in the 1960s.

Wingard discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his political career. He talks about serving on the Eugene City Council from 1967 to 1969, including his campaign and working on transportation issues. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1969 to 1970. He discusses his campaign, his fellow legislators, his committee assignments, and some of the legislation he worked on. He also talks about working with Governor Tom McCall's administration. He speaks at length about his opinions on issues such as abortion, field burning, and nuclear power. Wingard discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1982. He talks about electing Senate presidents, his committee assignments, and his fellow legislators. He discusses legislation that came up, particularly the Bottle Bill and bills on nuclear power and land use planning. He also talks about his opposition to the lottery; his views on the criminal justice system; and the creation of single-member districts and how that affected the make-up of the Legislature. He speaks at length about the many pieces of legislation he introduced. Wingard discusses his unsuccessful 1980 campaign for state treasurer and his 1982 re-election loss.

Wingard discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about his unsuccessful campaign for state treasurer in 1992. He closes the interview by talking about the Oregon legislative delegation of 1993.

Wingard, George F., Jr. (George Frank), 1935-

Oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson

This oral history interview with C. Girard Davidson was conducted by Thomas Wright at Davidson's home in Portland, Oregon, from December 2, 1994, to January 24, 1995. In this interview, Davidson discusses his family background and early life in Lafayette, Louisiana, including detailed descriptions of the plantations his extended family owned; his ancestors' involvement in the Confederate Army; his early education; and spending summers in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also briefly addresses the racism he learned in his childhood and confronting his prejudices later in life, and describes segregation in southern Louisiana. He also discusses the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. He talks about attending the Southwestern Louisiana Institute and studying law at Tulane University and at Yale Law School.

Davidson discusses working as an attorney for the Tennessee Valley Authority. He talks about rural electrification and legal battles with private electrical utilities. He talks about practicing law in Lafayette, Louisiana, and his marriage to Mercedes Hester. He discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, to work as a consultant to the Bonneville Power Administration. He speaks at length about his work for the War Production Board during World War II. Davidson also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; serving as assistant secretary of the interior in the Truman administration; and his efforts toward creating a Columbia Valley Authority.

Davidson, C. Girard (Crowe Girard), 1910-

Oral history interview with Vern Cook

This oral history interview with Robert Vernon "Vern" Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at Cook's law office in Gresham, Oregon, and Cook's home in Troutdale, Oregon, from December 15, 1994, to October 15, 1995. In the interview, Cook discusses his family background and early life during the Depression in Las Animas, Colorado, and in Gresham. He also describes being a young man during World War II; being denied enlistment in the Navy due to polio; and his rehabilitation from polio. Cook discusses studying political science at Reed College and law at the University of Oregon, all while working concessions at various businesses in California with his brother. He talks about practicing law in Gresham; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and his first campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1956. Cook discusses the legislation he worked on while serving in the House, including taxation, education, and worker's compensation. He also talks about serving on the judicial committee and related issues. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with, including Pat Dooley and Monroe Sweetland, as well as Governor Mark Hatfield.

Cook then describes his experience in the Oregon Senate, including serving on the judiciary committee and legislation on taxation, particularly sales taxes, as well as health insurance, education, land use, agriculture, domestic violence, and labor. He also talks about working with senators Tom Mahoney, Edith Green, Walter Pearson, Debbs Potts, Monte Montgomery, Alice Corbett, Ted Hallock, Jason Boe, and Vic Atiyeh. Cook also discusses party politics and its influence on the effectiveness of the Legislature during his tenure; the 1968 Democratic National Convention; and working with Governor Tom McCall and Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt. He also talks about his unsuccessful campaigns for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate; his involvement in Frank Church's campaign in the Democratic presidential primary in 1976; and the financial difficulties he faced as a legislator. He closes the interview by discussing his career as a lawyer since leaving the Legislature in 1980.

Cook, Vern (Robert Vernon), 1925-2008

Oral history interview with Clay Myers

This oral history interview with Clay Myers was conducted by Tom Wright at the Oregon Historical Society and at Wright's home in Portland, Oregon, from June 17 to October 27, 1994. In this interview, Myers describes his family background and early life at length. He discusses the year he spent in South Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and how that experience helped form his politics. He also talks about life on a farm in Tillamook, Oregon, during the Depression. He talks about attending Benson High School, enlisting in the U.S. Navy immediately after graduation in 1945, and attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in Connecticut until his discharge later that same year. He also talks about choosing the Episcopalian Church and the Republican Party as a teenager. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including his social life, his involvement with the Young Republicans, and fraternities. He discusses attending Northwestern College of Law in Portland and working in real estate at the Trust Department of the First National Bank. He then discusses campaigning for Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 and the controversy surrounding Wayne Morse at the 1952 Republican convention. He also discusses going to work for Aetna Insurance. He talks about meeting Elizabeth Arndt through the Young Republicans, their courtship, and their wedding in 1955. He goes on to talk about returning to Oregon in 1956 and raising a family, the houses the family lived in, and his children's educations. He discusses his friendship with Tom McCall, his relationship with the press, and the election of Mark Hatfield to the governorship in 1958, as well as the effect it had on McCall. He goes on to discuss his involvement in Republican politics, both national and in Oregon, in the 1950s through the 1980s, including his work campaigning. He also discusses his work with the Episcopalian Church, particularly his work toward allowing women, as well as lesbians and gays, to become priests. He also talks about his personal health history.

Myers discusses his political career, beginning with his service on the Multnomah County Welfare Commission, then on the State Welfare Commission under Governor Mark Hatfield. He also talks about serving as assistant secretary of state to Tom McCall from 1965 to 1966, and about his own term as secretary of state from 1967 to 1977. He talks at length about working with McCall and helping him campaign. He discusses the duties of the office, particularly overseeing elections and audits. He also discusses the behind-the-scenes political machinations of the Republican presidential nomination of 1968. He closes the interview by talking about acting as governor during the prison riots of 1968.

Myers, Clay, 1927-2004

Oral history interview with Harry D. Boivin

This oral history interview with Harry Boivin was conducted by Clark Hansen in Boivin's office in Medford, Oregon, from July 25, 1991, to June 6, 1992. In this interview, Boivin discusses his family history and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon, as well as his education at Santa Clara University in California. He then discusses getting started in his law career, including working for the district attorney in Dorris, California, and then working with Claude McColloch in Klamath Falls.

Boivin then talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1935 to 1942, including serving as speaker of the House in 1937. He discusses partisan politics and coalition building; the old Capitol building and conditions after it burned down in 1937; his support of the New Deal; and his time as speaker. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with in the House, including Grace Peck. He also talks briefly about his activities after leaving the House, including trying to enlist during World War II, as well as serving on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Board of Education.

Boivin goes on to discuss serving in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1972, including as Senate president from 1961 to 1966. Some of the issues he discusses include reapportionment, logging and forestry, taxation, and agriculture. He also talks about campaigning, committee assignments, and the duties of the Senate president. Boivin talks often about the Oregon Institute of Technology and his role in its formation. He also discusses his working relationship with the many governors that served during his political career. He discusses his fellow senators, including Monte Montgomery, Al Ullman, Wayne Morse, and Debbs Potts.

He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the Democratic and Republican parties, and politics in general, over the second half of the 20th century.

Boivin, Harry D. (Harry Dolan), 1904-1999

Oral history interview with Bill Hedlund

This oral history interview with Bill Hedlund was conducted by Clark Hansen from September 4-25, 1990. In the interview, Hedlund discusses his family history and early life in Portland, Oregon, including notable people that his family knew, such as Oswald West; his memories of World War I; and his early involvement with the Democratic Party. He then discusses his experience during the Depression, and attending the University of Oregon and the Northwestern College of Law. He talks about his early career as a deputy U.S. marshal and on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. He also discusses practicing law in Portland, then in the U.S. Attorney's office; the evolution of his political outlook; his father's political career; and his experience in the Coast Guard auxiliary during World War II. Hedlund then discusses his term in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1941 to 1942, including his campaign, his staff and office arrangements, and legislation. He then discusses working in the U.S. Attorney's office from 1943 to 1945, after leaving the Legislature. He also talks about his 33 years as a lobbyist, particularly for oil companies, from 1945 to 1977. He discusses issues the oil lobby was concerned with, including oil spills, gas additives, and environmental legislation. He also talks briefly about the plane accident that killed Secretary of State Robert S. Farrell, Jr., Senate President Marshall E. Cornett, and Governor Earl Snell. He discusses governors of Oregon and their staffs, as well as several legislators. He closes the interview by talking about the lobbying profession in more detail, particularly his work for oil companies, and his service as commissioner of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission from 1980 to 1987.

Hedlund, Bill (William Hancock), 1910-1994

Oral history interview with Becky Johnson

This oral history interview with Elizabeth Johnson was conducted by Rick Harmon and Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from June 25, 1986, to March 31, 1993. In the interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Bellevue, Ohio, including her family's religious faith, and life under Prohibition and during the Depression. She then discusses attending Miami University, including joining a sorority, her involvement with the YWCA, and the discrimination she saw. She also discusses attending Wellesley College, then teaching English to high school students. Johnson then talks about her experience as a woman in the Navy during World War II, serving with the WAVES, particularly her time stationed in Portland and Astoria, Oregon.

Johnson then discusses, at length, the family background and early life of her husband, Oregon State Representative Sam Johnson. She discusses Sam Johnson's youth and his education in the San Francisco area and in France, as well as his struggle with hereditary gout. She talks about their marriage and settling in Redmond, Oregon, and Sam's career with his family's timber business, including a trip they took to Chile to explore timber opportunities there. She also discusses the S.S. Johnson Foundation.

Johnson goes on to talk about her involvement in Oregon politics, including her involvement with the Oregon Republican Women's organization, campaigning for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and particularly her role on the State Board of Education. She also talks about Sam Johnson's time in the Oregon House of Representatives, his relationship to the changing Republican Party, and legislation he was involved with. She also discusses his time as mayor of Redmond. Johnson closes the interview by talking about her family life.

Johnson, Becky (Elizabeth Avery Hill), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry

This oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Talent, Oregon, from May 6-7, 1993. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life in Talent, including life on the family farm and the Depression. He also discusses the political career of his father, Earl T. Newbry. He talks about his education in Talent, as well as attending Oregon State College, and then Pomona College. He also briefly discusses serving in the Air Force during World War II. He discusses his courtship with Charlotte Short and their subsequent marriage in 1943. He discusses his return to Oregon in 1945 and taking over the family orchards and fruit business in 1949 when his father was appointed secretary of state, as well as several community organizations he was involved with. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, serving on the Talent school board, and running for the Oregon Senate in 1960. He discusses his legislative career in the Senate from 1961 to 1974, including his committee assignments. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Harry Boivin, Grace Peck, Ted Hallock, Stafford Hansell, Debbs Potts, Bill Holmstrom, and Jason Boe. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on land use, labor, taxes, health care, and agriculture. He talks about the administrations of governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, and Neil Goldschmidt; coalitions in the Senate; the procedure of creating legislation; and reapportionment. He closes the interview by discussing SB 100, the land-use planning bill of 1974.

Newbry, Lynn W. (Lyndel Warren), 1923-2012

Oral history interview with Harold Pubols, by Louise Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

Pubols discusses his family background, parents, siblings, Russian heritage, immigration to United States, early life working on a farm in Eastern Oregon, educational history etc.

Pubols, Harold

Oral history interview with James McDonald, by Marian Wood Kolisch

McDonald discusses his family background and early life in Scotland, his experiences during World War I in the Royal Air Force stationed in France, moving to Canada and working on farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan, moving to the United States, getting into the timber business, and becoming the British Consul in Portland just before World War II.

McDonald, James, 1899-1989

Oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher, by Susan Gaughan

  • SR 1038
  • Collection
  • 1984-08-16

Luscher discusses his family background and dairy farming in Clackamas County, Oregon, and the changes in milking technology and the dairy business over the 20th century. Bill Tegart was also present.

Luscher, Rudolph

Oral history interview with Barbara Mackenzie, by Jan Dilg and Katy Barber

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 – 2001-06-01

Barbara Mackenzie discusses her family history; childhood in eastern Oregon; growing up with brother, Ralph Tudor (later Secretary of the Interior); work at Celilo Falls during the 1950s relocation of Celilo Indians; work with the Red Cross; The Dalles Dam.

MacKenzie, Barbara

Senator Mark O. Hatfield Oral History Project

  • SR Hatfield
  • Collection
  • 1987 - 1988

Restricted until very recently, this series of interviews was conducted with Senator Hatfield’s congressional aids, staff and advisors. Senator Hatfield had a long and distinguished career in public service. He began his career as an Oregon State Legislator. He was both Oregon’s youngest Secretary of State and Governor. Later, he was a United States Senator from Oregon for 30 years, the longest term of any senator from Oregon. He is perhaps best known for his early and consistent opposition to the Vietnam War.

Interviewees include: Douglas Coe, associate director of The Fellowship, who has had close relationships with many American politicians; Martin Gold, a member of the United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, appointed by George H.W. Bush, he was counsel to Bill First, Howard Baker and Mark Hatfield; Loren Hicks, counsel to Hatfield and later held many judgeships in Oregon, including circuit judge for Marion County; and Sam Mallicoat, a veteran of WWII and the Korean War, and Chief of Staff for Senator Hatfield during his first senate term.

Oral history interview with Marty B. Gold

This oral history interview with Marty B. Gold was conducted by Clark Hansen at Gold's office in Washington, D.C., from June 13-16, 1988. In this interview, Gold discusses his family background and early life in New York City and Miami Beach, Florida, including his early political beliefs. He discusses attending American University in Washington, D.C., including his involvement in Republican politics. He talks about how he came to be aware of Mark Hatfield; Republican party politics in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly the 1968 presidential election; and Hatfield's stance on controversial issues such as abortion and the Vietnam War. He then briefly describes his service in Vietnam.

Gold discusses his work as a legal assistant to Hatfield from 1972 to 1979, while Hatfield was a U.S. senator. He talks about his duties, including applying for grants, sitting in on committee meetings, and legislation he was involved with. He also discusses other members of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's personality, and Hatfield's re-election campaigns. He talks about being named Outstanding Young Man in America in 1977, Hatfield's filibuster on legislation about the draft, and leaving Hatfield's staff to work for U.S. Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the U.S. Senate during his time there and his political philosophy.

Gold, Martin B., 1947-

Oral history interview with Freeman Holmer

This oral history interview with Freeman Holmer was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from May 17-24, 1988. In this interview, Holmer discusses his family background and early life in the Midwest. He then talks briefly about his college experience, his World War II service, and his early political beliefs. He discusses teaching political science at Willamette University from 1949 to 1959, including meeting fellow faculty member Mark Hatfield. He talks about Hatfield's friendship with Travis Cross, Hatfield's spirituality, and his own involvement with the Republican Party.

Holmer discusses Hatfield's campaign for Oregon secretary of state; talks about serving as director of elections from 1957 to 1959; and describes other members of Hatfield's staff. He then talks about Hatfield's campaign for Oregon governor; serving as director of the Department of Finance and Administration from 1959 to 1966; and Hatfield's staff. He also talks about Hatfield's marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich. He talks about Hatfield's agenda as governor, including government reorganization; Hatfield's emergency response to a flood in 1964; and Hatfield's relationship with other prominent Oregon politicians, including Tom McCall, as well as members of the business community. He discusses Hatfield's position on some controversial issues, particularly the Vietnam War. He then describes his own efforts toward Oregon's economic development; Hatfield's keynote address at the 1964 Republican National Convention; and attending governors' conferences.

Holmer then discusses his activities since leaving Hatfield's staff when Hatfield was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1966. He talks about serving as director of environmental protection for the state of Wisconsin from 1966 to 1968. He closes the interview by discussing his continued relationship with Hatfield.

Holmer, Freeman

Oral history interview with Richard H. Jones

This oral history interview with Richard H. Jones was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from December 11, 1987, to January 13, 1988. In this interview, Jones discusses his family background and early life in Colorado, including his early education. He then discusses his memories of the Depression and coming to the West Coast to accept a teaching job at Stanford University in 1938. He then talks about teaching history at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and becoming acquainted with Mark Hatfield and Gerry Frank. He discusses his involvement in Hatfield's 1958 campaign for Oregon governor. He discusses appointments Hatfield made as governor, and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He also talks about the differences and similarities between Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall. He describes Hatfield's accomplishments as governor, including on education; Hatfield's relationship with the state Legislature; and the attempt to revise the Oregon constitution in the early 1960s. He discusses Hatfield's involvement with national Republican politics in the 1960s, particularly his involvement in the Goldwater and Nixon presidential campaigns. He also talks about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and how his own views aligned with Hatfield's; his involvement with Hatfield's senatorial campaigns; and Hatfield's relationship with U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's support for the National Rifle Association.

Jones, Richard H. (Richard Hutton), 1914-1998

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