Showing 193 results

Collections
Only top-level descriptions
Print preview View:

Portland General Electric Photograph Collection

  • Org. Lot 151
  • Collection
  • 1880 - 1965

Negatives documenting company activities, including electrical infrastructure, employees, power generation and distribution throughout Portland, the Willamette Valley and the Oregon Cascade Range. Additional general images include streetcars and trains, street lighting, power line installation, Rose Festival floats, office buildings, car barns and bridges. Of particular note are dam building projects at Bull Run and along the Clackamas River (1910-1930), and early electric stations in Oregon City at Willamette Falls.

Portland General Electric Company

Oral history interview with Barbara Mackenzie, by Jan Dilg and Katy Barber

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 – 2001-06-01

Barbara Mackenzie discusses her family history; childhood in eastern Oregon; growing up with brother, Ralph Tudor (later Secretary of the Interior); work at Celilo Falls during the 1950s relocation of Celilo Indians; work with the Red Cross; The Dalles Dam.

Barber, Katrine

Carleton E. Watkins photographs, 1861-1885

  • Org. Lot 93
  • Collection
  • 1861 - 1885

This collection contains stereographs, cartes de visite, cabinet and boudoir cards, photograph albums, mammoth plates, and other loose prints taken by landscape photographer Carleton E. Watkins, 1861-1885. Watkins photographs that were taken before he lost his Yosemite Art Gallery studio in 1876 to Isaiah W. Taber are known as his "Old Series." Watkins photographs taken after 1876 are referred to as his "New Series." The collection contains both Old Series and New Series images and includes some of Watkins' photographs printed under Taber's imprint..

The bulk of the stereographs and mammoth plate photographs in this collection were taken during Watkins' trips to Oregon to photograph Portland, the Willamette River, and the Columbia River in 1867 (Old Series), as well as in 1882, 1883, and the winter of 1884-1885 (New Series). There are also some stereographs that were taken by Watkins on his 1882 voyage to photograph Puget Sound in the Washington Territory and Victoria in British Columbia. Other mammoth plates, cartes de visite, and stereographs depict views of places in California, including Yosemite and Mariposa County, the Farallon Islands and other scenes of the California coast, San Francisco, Round Top, Mount Lola, and Mount Shasta, as well as views of Utah taken for the Union Pacific Railroad. There are also cabinet card portraits taken by Watkins of various people, including Oregon railroad financier Simeon Gannett Reed and members of the family of Cornelius C. Beekman (1828-1915), banker from Jacksonville, Or.

The collection also contains two photograph albums assembled by Watkins and originally owned by Charles H. Prescott (b. 1839), manager of the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Co. from 1881-1887. One album, "Sun Sketches of Columbia River Scenery," contains images taken by Watkins during his trips to the Columbia River Gorge circa 1882-1883, and the second album, ""Great Storm of the Winter of 1884-5. Columbia River, Or.," contains images that he took during a winter blizzard in December and January of 1884-1885 that snowed in an Oregon Railway and Navigation Co. train on its tracks along the Columbia River. The collection also contains one group of stereographs entitled "Watkins' Pacific Railroad" that were originally taken by Alfred A. Hart, official photographer for the Central Pacific Railroad, between 1862-1869 and reprinted by Watkins under his own imprint after 1870.

Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce

  • SR 1571
  • Collection
  • 1984-09-07 - 1984-11-20

This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project.

Between the two sessions is an incomplete segment from a panel discussion regarding the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada. The discussion, held circa 1990, is moderated by Gordon Gulp, with an introductory speech by Charles F. Luce.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 1984, Luce discusses the Columbia River Treaty, including his own role as a negotiator, the terms of the treaty, and other members of the negotiating team. He talks about attempts to sell surplus power to California and Idaho, opposition to the Columbia River Treaty, and the long term benefits of the treaty. He closes the interview by talking about the early plans for Bonneville that he helped put together when he first began working at BPA in 1944.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with Erskine Wood

  • SR 1096
  • Collection
  • 1954-08-21

This oral history interview with Erskine Wood was conducted by William Renwick at Wood's home in Vancouver, Washington, on August 21, 1954. In this interview, Wood discusses his experiences as an adolescent living with Chief Joseph and the Nimiipuu people (Nez Perce tribe) in the Wallowa Valley, Oregon. He briefly talks about Chief Joseph's life story. He speaks about his daily life, including caring for horses, hunting, and taking sweat baths. He closes the interview by describing some Nez Perce recreational activities, including dancing, singing, and games.

Wood, Erskine

Oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey

  • SR 4001
  • Collection
  • 1994-02-25 - 1994-11-18

This oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Maxey's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to November 18, 1994. Johnnie Obina Maxey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1994, Maxey discusses his family background and early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including his education, growing up in a predominantly black neighborhood, and learning to navigate a racist world. He speaks at length about the importance of reading black authors in high school. He then discusses trying to find decent-paying work in Texas, Colorado, and Utah after graduating from college, and describes how he ultimately decided to settle in Portland, Oregon, in 1943. He talks about working in the shipyards in Portland during World War II and describes his frustration with being denied promotions and other job opportunities due to his youth and race. He then talks about beginning his career as a barber. He also reflects on his college experience at Texas College in Tyler, Texas, and talks about meeting Johnnie O. Maxey and his unrealized plans to go to law school. He discusses his political beliefs and involvement with the Republican Party in Oregon; talks about his first impressions of Portland; and describes how life in Oregon for black people differed from the South.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of his early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including racism he experienced, learning to navigate a racist world, and working at a drugstore. He also revisits the topics of his first impressions of Portland, working in the shipyards, and beginning his career as a barber. He describes racism he experienced in Portland.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 25, 1994, Maxey talks about a fight between his father and a white police officer in Texas, and how the fallout affected his family. He discusses conditions for black people in Texas, and how they changed during the lead-up to World War II; talks about his experiences working wartime jobs; and describes the development of his political philosophy at the time of the war. He talks about his involvement with the NAACP; discusses people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights; and discusses conditions for black people in Portland after the war. He talks about the social life of the black community, racism they experienced, and the passage of Oregon's various civil rights acts. He also talks about the experiences of black members of the U.S. military during World War II, as well as his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on April 1, 1994, Maxey continues discussing his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party and his involvement in the NAACP, as well as people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He also continues discussing his involvement in the NAACP. He discusses the slow progress of civil rights in Oregon; talks about his own activism; and shares his thoughts on interracial marriage. He talks about experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and discusses his experiences with Oregon Republicans such as Tom McCall, Clay Myers, and Sig Unander. He describes how the black community was disproportionately affected by the state's land seizures during the construction of I-5, including his own loss of his home and first two barbershops. He then discusses owning and operating a grocery store as a family business in North Portland, as well as a barbershop and other businesses that he ran on the side. He talks about raising his children, including their education.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on May 3, 1994, Maxey discusses the reasons why many black people left the South for the West. He talks about the types of jobs that were available to black people in Oregon during World War II and the impact of Oliver Smith's campaign for the Oregon Legislature, and he revisits the topic of people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He discusses his political views, his disagreements with the national Republican Party, and his reasons for remaining a registered Republican. He then revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and talks about having dinner with the governor of Utah. He shares his opinion on school integration and busing; talks about racism his children faced in Portland schools; and discusses the importance of historically black universities. He also revisits the topic of working in the shipyards and describes discrimination he experienced there. He describes the subtler forms that racism took in Oregon as opposed to the South. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers; discusses his upbringing in the African Methodist Episcopal Church; and reflects on his accomplishments.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 18, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and describes the process through which the convention passed his resolution that the Young Republicans never again hold a convention at any hotel with discriminatory practices.

Maxey, Charles B. (Charles Britton), 1917-2001

Oral history interview with Johnnie O. Maxey

  • SR 4000
  • Collection
  • 1994-02-25 - 1994-06-30

This oral history interview with Johnnie Maxey was conducted by Aaron Brand at Maxey's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to June 30, 1994. Charles Britton Maxey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview, which was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1994, Maxey discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Kilgore, Texas. She speaks at length about raising and preparing food; describes her childhood home; and talks about her early education. She then discusses attending Texas College, including meeting Charles Britton Maxey. She also talks about her mother's health, attending the AME Church, and racism she experienced. She discusses relocating to Portland in 1943; talks about the jobs that Charles Britton Maxey held; and describes her journey by train.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 31, 1991, Maxey revisits the topic of her early life in Kilgore, Texas, including her experience with rheumatic fever as a child, celebrating Juneteenth, and the community she grew up in. She also talks about her siblings and their families. She then discusses her life in Portland, including her social life, raising her family, and Charles Britton Maxey's career as a barber. She also talks about discrimination faced by the black community in Portland, including the lack jobs open to black people after World War II, the hostility towards black people in some neighborhoods, and the aftermath of the Vanport Flood. She discusses running a small grocery store, called Maxey's Better Buy Grocery, next door to her husband's barbershop.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 25, 1994, Maxey continues discussing Charles Britton Maxey's career as a barber and running the Maxeys' grocery store. She also talks about the experience of having two barbershops and their home seized by the state for the construction of the I-5 freeway. She speaks at length about dealing with customers; talks about other grocery stores in the neighborhood; and discusses her involvement in the community, including serving as president of her local parent teacher association. She also talks about school segregation and busing. She speaks at length about raising her children, and talks about their careers, as well as the racism they experienced.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 10, 1994, Maxey continues to discuss raising her children. She also talks about her relationship with her neighbors. She discusses her involvement with La Femme, which taught traditional etiquette to young girls, and talks about her involvement in her church, including its choir and working to promote black history to its congregation. She talks about racism she experienced in Portland, and how conditions for black people in Oregon have changed since the 1940s. She then briefly discusses Charles Britton Maxey's involvement with the Republican Party; shares her opinion on busing; and describes issues she had with some of her children's teachers. She also shares her memories of the civil rights movement.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on June 30, 1994, Maxey continues sharing her memories of the civil rights movement, and talks about how conditions for black people have changed in Oregon. She talks about black-owned businesses in North Portland, changes in the neighborhood, and changes in Portland's black community. She also briefly shares her political opinions. She speaks at length about her children, their careers, and their families. She closes the interview by talking about her grandchildren and her hopes for the future.

Maxey, Johnnie O. (Johnnie Obina), 1919-

Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway photographs

  • Org. Lot 78
  • Collection
  • 1890 - 1979

Photographs taken for the Burlington Northern Railroad and the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway. Subjects include railroad stations and yards; railroad tracks; trains; train wrecks; railroad bridge construction and maintenance; and railroad personnel, throughout Oregon and Washington. There are also photographs of various towns and landscapes Oregon, Washington, and California, through which the railroads passed, including images of the construction of the Bonneville Dam, the Columbia River and Columbia River Gorge, Mount Hood, and other mountains and lakes. The collection additionally contains photographs of people engaged in various recreations, including hiking, as well as a number of photographs relating to agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. There is also one photograph album containing interior and exterior photographs of the Reserved Seat Coach-Cafe Car of the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway in 1939. Photographers include Photo-Art Comercial Studios and Arthur M. Prentiss of Portland, Or., among many others.

Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway

Oral history interview with Donald W. McInnis

  • SR 1087
  • Collection
  • 1992-08-25 - 1992-11-10

This oral history interview with Donald W. McInnis was conducted by Mary Gorsline from August 25 to November 10, 1992. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 25, 1992, McInnis speaks at length about his family background and how they came to settle near Reedville, Oregon, including his parents' overland journey to the Pacific Northwest. He speaks in detail about driving oxen-drawn wagons. He talks about his early life on a homestead near Reedville, including the store his father ran, meeting his future wife, Julia Flint, and working at a feed mill. He describes the communities of Hazeldale and Reedville, including a story of a man who abused his horses; Chinese members of the community; and a lost cemetery. He also talks about the social life in those communities; Julia Flint's family background; and the wildlife in the Reedville area.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 10, 1992, McInnis discusses his father, Duncan Mullen McInnis, and his father's career as a police officer in Portland, his memories of the general store his father ran, and the fire that burned the store down. He shares more stories from his early life and talks about his education. He closes the interview by talking about using public transportation in the Portland area in the early 20th century, working on the family dairy farm in Ridgefield, Washington, and loading Fresno scrapers, a type of earthmoving machinery.

McInnis, Donald W. (Donald William), 1900-1994

Oral history interview with Al Monner

  • SR 1068
  • Collection
  • 1993-02-25 - 1993-03-04

This oral history interview with Al Monner was conducted by Donald J. Sterling at Monner's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to March 4, 1993. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1993, Monner discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Kaskela, Oregon, including his education, his sister, and his recreational activities. He then talks about moving to Portland in 1923, his high school education, and his early interest in photography. He speaks about working for a public library, attending Linfield College, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He discusses working for Photo Art Studio, his friendship with Ray Atkeson, and his involvement with the Wy'east Climbers.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1993, Monner revisits the topics of his family background, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He speaks about his early career as a photographer for the Oregonian newspaper and describes his photography equipment. He then discusses his career as a photographer for the Oregon Journal newspaper, his photography equipment, and some of his assignments. He also talks about his freelance work, as well as photography he did for himself; photographers he worked with, including Minor White; and his involvement with the Mazamas and mountain climbing. He speaks about his marriage to Catherine Elizabeth Gnadinger, and about his children, their careers, and their families. He speaks at length about photographing Portland's Romani community and Native Americans. He then talks about Catherine Elizabeth Monner's death in 1961 and his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing famous people and events that he photographed.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Oral history interview with Harold L. Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

This oral history interview with Harold Pubols was conducted by his niece, Louise Pubols, from January 10-22, 1988. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 10, 1988, Pubols discusses his family background and talks about how his family came to the United States, as well as his parents' marriage. He talks about his early life on a farm in Hillsboro, Oregon, including his education, daily life, and leaving home. He discusses his brother, John R. Pubols, including John R. Pubols' experience in the U.S. Army, his education, and his career. He then talks about his own education and playing sports. He discusses attending Columbia University, now known as the University of Portland, and then Oregon State University on football scholarships. He also talks about dating Frances Audrey Jones.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 22, 1988, Pubols returns to the topic of his family background and early life on a farm in Hillsboro, including raising livestock and suffering abuse at the hands of his father.

Pubols, Harold L. (Harold Louis), 1903-1993

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

  • SR 1002
  • Collection
  • 1991-07-16 - 1992-04-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from July 16, 1991, to April 29, 1992. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 16, 1991, Frank discusses his family background and how it intertwines with the history of the Meier & Frank Company. He talks about the company's founding in 1857 by his great-grandfather, Aaron Meier, and the growth of the store during the 19th century, including the store's Friday Surprise marketing strategy and the buildings the store inhabited. He then talks about the history of Meier & Frank during the early 20th century, including his uncle Julius Meier's term as Oregon governor from 1931 to 1935, competition with other department stores in Portland, and Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He also talks about the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1991, Frank continues discussing the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank, including his management of the Meier & Frank Department Store beginning in 1937. He also continues discussing Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He talks about the use of credit lines in the department store, particularly during the Depression. He discusses the Meier & Frank board of directors, and begins talking about the expansion of the store into Salem.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 21, 1991, Frank continues discussing the expansion of the Meier & Frank Department Store into Salem. He talks about managing the Salem branch from 1955 to 1965, including tailoring merchandise to the Salem community, his involvement in Salem community organizations, and his relationship with his employees. He also talks about the store's seasonal events and his relationship with other Meier & Frank store managers.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 29, 1992, Frank discusses the conditions that led to the sale of the Meier & Frank Department Store to the May Company in 1965. He describes the family divisions surrounding the sale. He then talks about resigning as manager of the Salem branch and the effect of the sale on the store's personnel and customer base. He closes the interview by talking about his relationship with the management of the Meier & Frank Department Store at the time of the interview in 1992.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Mark Bocek

  • SR 813
  • Collection
  • 1979-04-21

This oral history interview with Mark Bocek was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 21, 1979. Bocek's daughter, Rose Mary Bocek, also contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Bocek discusses his family background and early life in Poland. He talks about immigrating to the United States in 1905 and describes his experience as an immigrant in Pennsylvania and New York, including the jobs he worked. He talks about serving in the U.S. Army beginning in 1909, and describes spending 18 months stationed in the Philippines and playing clarinet in the Army band. Bocek and Strassmaier also talk about some photographs of Bocek's time in the U.S. Army. He briefly discusses his marriage to Rose White in 1914; his activities in the Army after returning from the Philippines in 1912; and settling in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his education in Poland, the jobs he held in Portland, including during the Depression, and building engines for Liberty ships during World War II. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers. Bocek and Rose Mary Bocek also share their memories of the Tillamook Burn. Bocek closes the interview by discussing the dedication necessary to learn how to play an instrument.

Bocek, Mark, 1887-1984

Oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre

  • SR 812
  • Collection
  • 1989-10-06 - 1990-01-12

This oral history interview with Mary E. Eyre was conducted by Vinita M. Howard at Eyre's home in Salem, Oregon, from October 6, 1989, to January 12, 1990. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 6, 1989, Eyre discusses her family background and early life in Buckley, Illinois. She talks about a family trip to Oregon in 1902 and tells a story about an escaped prisoner who was making headlines at the time. She discusses her first year of school in Illinois. She then talks about life in Salem, Oregon, including the family banking business, the family home, and their neighborhood. She also talks about her education in Salem.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 12, 1989, Eyre continues discussing the family home and neighborhood in Salem, and describes features that were common in houses in the early 20th century, particularly woodsheds. She talks about her education in Salem; describes the old Capitol building and businesses in downtown Salem; and talks about the family's first car. She also briefly talks about some of the floods that affected Marion County in the early 20th century. She talks about anti-Semitic attitudes, popular fashions, and attending church. She speaks again about her education in Salem. She talks about cultural events, particularly those organized by Chautauquas; the lead-up to World War I; and the education of her siblings, as well as their families and careers. She discusses attending Willamette University, and describes the campus and student body. She then talks about her career as a high school teacher in North Bend, Oregon, and at North Salem High School. She talks about some of her students, including Cecil L. Edwards, Edith Green, and Mark Hatfield. She also discusses her own political beliefs.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on January 12, 1990, Eyre discusses her fan collection, and also describes some of her travels. She then talks about her 1963 run for the Oregon Legislature and her involvement in various organizations, including the teachers' union. She talks about school funding, mandatory retirement ages for teachers, and what she believes makes a good teacher. She closes the interview by discussing grading, year-round schooling, and her hopes for the future of Oregon.

Eyre, Mary E. (Mary Eleanor), 1897-1999

Oral history interview with Dick Bown

  • SR 786
  • Collection
  • 1991-11-20 - 1991-12-02

This oral history interview with Dick Bown was conducted by Alex R. Toth, Jr., at Rose Auto Wrecking in North Portland, Oregon, from November 20 to December 2, 1991. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 20, 1991, Bown discusses his family background and early life, particularly relocating to the Portland, Oregon, area from South Dakota in 1941, and his early interest in cars. He talks about running a service station and a billiard supply business. He speaks at length about his life as a race car driver, including his various cars; his first races in Oregon in the early 1950s; NASCAR and Oregon Auto Racing Association races in the 1960s; and the different tracks he has raced on. He also talks about his auto-wrecking business, Rose Auto Wrecking. He then continues discussing his life as a race car driver, including his relationship with his fellow racers and his competitive spirit.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 1991, Bown continues discussing his competitive spirit. He revisits the topic of running a service station and Rose Auto Wrecking, including his experience going bankrupt in 1953 and the history of both businesses. He then discusses his children – Chuck Bown, Sheri Bown, and Jim Bown – and their involvement in automobile racing. He revisits the topic of the race cars he has driven and the tracks he has raced at. He talks about media coverage of car racing on the West Coast, as compared to the South and the East Coast; discusses the athleticism involved in car racing; and describes changes in the technology of racing. He closes the interview by discussing the future of car racing in the Pacific Northwest, and the experience of raising a family as a race car driver.

Bown, Dick (Richard Charles), 1928-

Oral history interview with John R. Leach

  • SR 758
  • Collection
  • 1968-02-22 - 1968-02-23

This oral history interview with John R. Leach was conducted by Jean S. Whitford from February 22-23, 1968. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 22, 1968, Leach discusses his wife, Lilla Leach. He tells stories from his recently published autobiography, "Oxbows and Bare Feet," including his remembrances of Sam Warfield, known as "Uncle Sam"; Lorenzo Chapman; Joe Meeks; and others in the Lexington, Oregon, area. He also discusses the history of the Leach family and their journey west to Oregon.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 23, 1968, Leach discusses frontier life, folk medicine, and his childhood and early life in Eastern Oregon. He closes the interview by describing his adventures with Lilla Leach.

Leach, John Roy, 1882-1972

Oregon Historical Society Nominated Oral Histories

  • SR Oregon Historical Society Nominated Oral Histories
  • Collection
  • 2017-

An ongoing series of oral history interviews with Oregonians. The subjects are selected from a pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the OHS Executive Director. The purpose of these interviews is to create historical documents of enduring value that will enhance and expand the range of Oregon voices preserved by the OHS Research Library and that will complement existing collections and programs of the Oregon Historical Society and address goals for collection development and community engagement.

Oregon Historical Society

Aaron M. Frank address to Meier and Frank employees

  • SR 294
  • Collection
  • 1949-03-24

This speech was delivered by Aaron M. Frank on March 24, 1949, at the Meier & Frank Department Store in Portland, Oregon. In this speech, Frank urges the assembled store employees to resist union organizing efforts. He enumerates the benefits provided to employees by Meier & Frank, gives examples of management and employee loyalty, lists his responsibilities as director, and makes a plea for an employee vote of confidence. The employees ultimately voted against unionization.

Frank, Aaron M. (Aaron Meier), 1891-1968

Oral history interview with William Francis Lambert

  • SR 81
  • Collection
  • 1980-07-14

This oral history interview with William Francis Lambert was conducted by Linda S. Dodds on July 14, 1980, at Lambert's home in Portland, Oregon. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Lambert discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He speaks at length about spending summers at the YMCA Spirit Lake Boys' Camp from 1913 to 1916, describing the camp rules, activities, and buildings. He also talks about some of the camp personnel and his fellow campers. He then discusses his work history, particularly working in the timber industry in Oregon and as a railroad worker in Alaska. He closes the interview by talking about his experiences in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Lambert, William Francis, 1902-1985

Franklin D. Roosevelt dedication of Bonneville Dam

  • SR 23
  • Collection
  • 1937-09-29

This audio recording consists of a speech delivered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on September 29, 1937, at the opening of the Bonneville Dam. It includes introductory remarks on traffic safety by Oregon Governor Earl Snell. The recording has been edited for radio broadcast and is a condensed version of Roosevelt's speech. A transcript, which was published in The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, includes the full text of his remarks.

In the speech, Roosevelt speaks about the challenges posed by urban growth, including traffic congestion, housing prices, and increased energy consumption. He then talks about the regional benefits of the Bonneville Dam and future dam projects on the Columbia River. He addresses his plan for rural electrification, as well as the arguments of those opposed to the plan. He closes the speech by again describing the benefits of the Bonneville Dam to the region.

Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945

Oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon

  • SR 1
  • Collection
  • 1983-03-16

This oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon was conducted by Elizabeth Buehler at the Harmon home in Beavercreek, Oregon, on March 16, 1983. In this interview, the Harmons discuss their experience of graduating from Iowa State College, now Iowa State University, in the midst of the Depression with no job prospects in Iowa. Wendell H. Harmon describes choosing to leave Iowa for a homestead near Elk City, Oregon, in 1933. He talks about farming the land on the homestead, and Florence E. Harmon talks about their neighbors. She also talks about her experience being fired from her teaching job as a result of her marriage to Wendell H. Harmon. They discuss their experience setting up their homestead, including building and furnishing a house, preparing the land, and raising livestock. They talk about maintaining the homestead after Wendell H. Harmon accepted a forestry job in 1935 that involved work primarily outside Oregon, and about the process of acquiring the deed to the land. They close the interview by discussing tree farming, as well as the sale of their homestead.

Harmon, Wendell H. (Wendell Harold), 1910-1999

Gilliam Portrait Studio and Camera Shop negatives

  • Org. Lot 1275
  • Collection
  • 1930-1970

Collection consists of approximately 600 negatives used to produce photographic postcards. The photographs date from 1930 to 1970 and depict landmarks, city streets, storefronts, and tourist destinations across Oregon. A selection of places and events represented in this collection include Breitenbush Hot Springs, the Columbia River Gorge, Crater Lake National Park, Oregon Caves National Monument, The Pendleton Round-Up, Petersen Rock Garden, and Singing Springs Ranch. Also included are street scenes from cities and towns in all regions of the state.

Many of the negatives have original postcard series numbering and a photographer's signature written directly onto the film. Three photographers are represented in the collection; their signatures identify them only as Christian, Perkins, and Ellis. About 70 percent of the work in the collection is attributed to Christian. It is unknown whether the photographers were employed by the Gilliam Portrait Studio and Camera Shop. The studio was likely a purchaser or publisher of their negatives.

Gilliam Portrait Studio and Camera Shop

Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project

  • SR Oregon Wine Oral History Series
  • Collection
  • 1990-2003

The Oregon Wine Archives, established at the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) Library, preserves the history of the wine growing industry in Oregon through the collection of various media, including manuscripts, photographs, artifacts, films, and oral histories.

From 2002 to 2003, OHS conducted interviews with notable figures in the wine growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon’s wine industry.

The oral interviews collected through this project aim to facilitate better historical understanding in the following areas:

· the process of growing grapes and how it has changed
· the process of wine making and how it has changed
· the experiences and perceptions of people in the wine industry
· how the wine making business has changed
· insight on events related to the wine industry
· community attitudes toward wine and the wine industry
· the economic and social evolution of the wine industry in Oregon
· lobbying and legislative efforts on behalf of the wine industry

Lily E. White photographs

  • Org. Lot 662
  • Collection
  • 1900-1905

Collection consists of 43 photographs taken by Lily E. White and other members of the Oregon Camera Club between 1900 and 1905. The photographs depict landscape scenes of the Columbia River Gorge, the Pacific coast, and Mount Hood. Also included are posed portraits of members of the Klikitat and other Columbia River tribes. The photographs are mounted platinum prints and all but two of the prints are signed by the artist. 38 of the photographs are part of a tooled suede leather portfolio. The portfolio also contains prints signed by Sarah Hall Ladd, Will H. Walker, and Maud Ainsworth. In addition to the portfolio, the collection also contains five prints signed by Lily E. White from a separate accession.

White, Lily E.

Lily E. White negatives

  • Org. Lot 1415
  • Collection
  • 1900-1915

Collection consists of negatives from the estate of Lily E. White. They are attributed to White but some of the photographs were possibly taken by Sarah Hall Ladd. The photographs date from approximately 1900-1915. Topical highlights in the collection include landscape views of the Columbia River Gorge, Garden scenes and flower photographs taken at the home of Charles Elliott Ladd and Sarah Hall Ladd, and interior and exterior views of Lily E. Whites’ houseboat, The Raysark. Also included in the collection are photographs and scrapbook pages taken during trips to Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, and along the coast near Carmel, California.

White, Lily E.

Al Monner news negatives

  • Org. Lot 1284
  • Collection
  • 1936-1974

The vast majority of this collection is made up of negatives created by Al Monner for the Oregon Journal. A small number of negatives were likely created by fellow Journal photographer Ralph Vincent, also for the Oregon Journal. While it's likely that almost all the negatives in this collection were created as part of Monner's work for the Journal, some images may also be his personal work. Most of the negatives are black and white, with a handful of color images taken in the 1950s and 1960s. A small selection of images from 1936 to 1938 were likely taken during Monner's time at the Oregonian newspaper. Large-format negatives from 1936 to 1959 have been processed and inventoried, while 35mm film from 1959 to 1974 remains unprocessed.

The photographs highlight over 30 years of current events in and around the Portland area, with a smaller number taken elsewhere in the state. Yearly events, such as the Portland Rose Festival and the Pendleton Round-Up, are featured prominently. A substantial number of images from the 1940s show Portland war efforts during World War II, featuring photographs of shipyards, soldiers, and rationing efforts at home. A small number of photographs also show early incarceration of Japanese Americans. Monner also frequently photographed dam-building efforts on the Columbia River at Celilo Village, The Dalles, and Bonneville.

Also included are photographs of accident scenes, fires, explosions, new building projects, sporting events, contest winners, and important national figures visiting the Portland area. Taken together, the collection displays the breadth of Monner's work as a photojournalist, covering the everyday to the exciting.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Results 1 to 28 of 193