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Milwaukie Pastry Kitchen photographs and news clippings

  • Org. Lot 1311
  • Collection
  • 1977-1988

The collection consists of six photographs showing cakes made by the Milwaukie Pastry Kitchen, Hurtis Hadley decorating cakes, and wearing his Albertsons Bakery uniform after he closed the Pastry Kitchen. In addition to the photographs, there are 21 clippings from newspaper articles about Hurtis Hadley and Dorothy Hadley. Most of the clippings relate to the Pastry Kitchen, but some relate to Hurtis Hadley’s decorating mentor, Larry Powell, or to Hadley’s work at other bakeries. Materials range from 1977 to 1988.

Oregon School for the Deaf photographs

  • Org. Lot 618
  • Collection
  • 1870-1989

Collection consists of photographs related to the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oregon. The photographs date from about 1880 to 1989. Included in the collection are photographs showing the outside of the school buildings and campus grounds; the inside of classrooms, dorms, dining areas, and other spaces; the farmland which belonged to the school and was worked by students; and exhibits in the Oregon School for the Deaf Heritage Museum. Other images include sports team photographs, especially of boys and girls basketball teams from 1907 to 1947; students participating in activities such as club meetings, playing in the snow, going to dances, and swimming; school and class photos of students and staff; students in their classes, including general education, printing, sewing, cooking, woodworking, and home economics. The collection also includes portraits of individuals who were important to the school, including Mark Hamstreet, William S. Smith, and Edward and Hilda Tillinghast, as well as a photograph of attendees at the first biennial meeting of the Oregon Association of the Deaf. Most of these photographs are copies from originals held by the Oregon School for the Deaf Heritage Museum. Many photographs are mounted on photo mats and almost all include explanatory notes provided by Mark Hamstreet, the first historian and curator of the Oregon School for the Deaf Heritage Museum.

Oral history interview with Mayo Rae Roy

  • SR 9355
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-10

This oral history interview with Mayo Rae Roy was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Lake Oswego, Oregon, on September 10, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds's name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Roy discusses her early life in Portland, Oregon, including her early interest in table tennis. She talks about her career as a table tennis player, including her equipment and playing technique. She talks about tournaments she played in, including one in Japan just before the beginning of World War II. She closes the interview by speaking about her final tournament in 1952 and talking about how the sport changed.

Roy, Mayo Rae, 1919-2005

Oral history interview with Lawrence Leighton Smith

  • SR 9343
  • Collection
  • 1980-05-12

This oral history interview with Lawrence Leighton Smith was conducted by Linda S. Dodds on May 12, 1980, in Portland, Oregon, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Portland, particularly his early musical education. He talks about his experience studying music at Portland State University, with Ariel Rubstein, and at Mannes College of Music. He describes serving as assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera from 1964 to 1967. He then speaks at length about his career as conductor and music director for the Oregon Symphony in Portland from 1973 to 1980, including working with musicians, developing programs, and playing to Oregon audiences. He closes the interview by talking about his hopes for his next career as music director for the San Antonio Symphony.

Smith, Lawrence Leighton

Oral history interview with Richard Bryson

  • SR 1258
  • Collection
  • 1990-03-14 - 1990-04-11

This oral history interview with Richard Bryson was conducted by Les M. Swanson, Jr. at Bryson's office in Eugene, Oregon, from March 14 to April 11, 1990. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 14, 1990, Bryson discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including the law career of his father, Edwin R. Bryson, and grandfather, John R. Bryson; his education; and his interest in golf. He speaks at length about studying law at Stanford University and the University of Oregon, including his professors and social life. He briefly talks about his service in counterintelligence in Europe during World War II. He discusses working as a lawyer in Eugene, and talks about judges he argued before, including G.F. Skipworth and James Alger Fee. He discusses some of the cases he worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 11, 1990, Bryson continues to discuss his work as a lawyer in Eugene, and to talk about judges he argued before. He speaks about lawyers he worked with, particularly Windsor Calkins. He also revisits the topic of his early life in Eugene and his father's law career. He closes the interview by talking about cases he worked on.

Bryson, A. Richard (Arthur Richard), 1916-1999

Marcus and Narcissa Whitman collection, 1834-1947

  • Mss 1203
  • Collection
  • 1834-1947

The collection consists of papers of and relating to missionaries Marcus and Narcissa Whitman. A substantial portion of the collection consists of letters that they wrote to Narcissa Whitman's family. These letters describe the Whitmans' overland journey to the Pacific Northwest in 1836, and their lives as missionaries in the following decade. The letters also frequently express frustration with Native peoples' cultural norms and their reluctance to convert to Calvinist Christianity, often using patronizing and derogatory language. The letters also include pejorative terms for Roman Catholics and for biracial people of Native and European or Euro-American descent.

Other writings by the Whitmans include typescript copies of their correspondence with the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and a typescript of Marcus Whitman's proposed legislation to establish outposts to assist Euro-American emigrants traveling westward. Other materials in the collection include original and reproduced materials regarding the Whitman killings and their aftermath; microfilm of Mary Saunders and Helen Saunders' recollections of the Whitman killings and aftermath; and items related to the memorialization of the Whitmans, including efforts in the 1890s to erect a monument in their honor.

Oral history interview with Thomas Vaughan

  • SR 2090
  • Collection
  • 1995-10-01 - 1996-12-02

This oral history interview with Thomas Vaughan was conducted by Sieglinde Smith at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 1, 1995, to December 2, 1996, as part of the historical society's oral history program. The interview was conducted in nine sessions. Tape 17 is missing, and Tape 25, the final cassette of the interview recording, was removed from the collection by Vaughan at the time of the interview.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 1, 1995, Vaughan discusses his family background and early life in Seattle, Washington; near Kelso, Washington; and in Longview, Washington, including his education, his family's experience during the Depression, and working in sawmills as a teenager. He talks about his service in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1943 to 1945, about his education at Yale University, and about working for the Macmillan Company after graduation. He describes a trip to Alaska, and talks about working in the Southwest in the 1940s. He then talks about his experiences at the University of Wisconsin.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1995, Vaughan shares additional anecdotes about the time he spent in Alaska, the Southwest, and Madison, Wisconsin. He briefly discusses his service as director of the Rock Creek Historical Society in Janesville, Wisconsin, and shares his reasons for accepting the job of executive director of the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, in 1954. He speaks at length about his early years at OHS, describes the condition of the library and museum, and talks about changes he made. He talks about his role in the establishment of the Fort Clatsop National Memorial; about working with the OHS board members, including David T. Mason and Tom McCall; and about the 1959 Oregon state centennial. He discusses selecting and purchasing the site for the OHS building on the Southwest Park Blocks in downtown Portland in the 1960s, and describes how OHS came to own the entire block between SW Jefferson, Madison, Broadway, and Park.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 8, 1995, Vaughan continues to discuss his service as executive director of OHS. He talks about the relationship between OHS and other archives in Oregon during his early years; about fundraising for the building construction on Southwest Park Avenue in the 1960s; and about working with Pietro Belluschi as consulting architect on the design of the museum and library. He also discusses OHS's relationship with Oregon governors Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall, as well as with the Legislature. He talks about developing collection security and preservation policies for the museum and library, about OHS's storage facilities, including the Meier & Frank building and the Oregon Journal building, and about moving the collections to the new building. He discusses building the OHS archival collection, including traveling to Siberia in 1968 for materials.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on November 13, 1995, Vaughan continues to discuss his service as executive director of OHS. He speaks further about his travels to Siberia to collect archival materials, and talks about forming relationships with Russian archives. He discusses cultivating relationships with donors; speaks further and at length about building the OHS archival collection, and talks about OHS's relationship with governors Bob Straub and Vic Atiyeh, with Portland mayors, and with Multnomah County government. He also talks about the preservation of the Bybee House on Sauvie Island. He speaks about his personal philosophy and managerial style.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on December 18, 1995, Vaughan continues to discuss his service as executive director of OHS. He talks about his involvement in historic preservation of buildings in Portland, and revisits the topics of the construction of the OHS building on Southwest Park Avenue and the purchase of the Sovereign Hotel. He talks about his reasons for retiring in 1989, about the North Pacific Studies program at OHS, and about the selection of his successor, Bill Tramposch. He speaks further about cultivating relationships with donors.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on December 19, 1995, Vaughan discusses his activities since his retirement. He talks about his house in Skamokawa, Washington, and describes the surrounding area.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on May 6, 1996, Vaughan continues to talk about the area of Skamokawa, Washington. He returns to the topic of his service as executive director of OHS. He talks about building, cataloging, and preserving the OHS collections, about cultivating relationships with donors, and about some of the collections acquired during his tenure.

In the eighth interview session, conducted on May 7, 1996, Vaughan continues to discuss some of the collections acquired during his time as OHS executive director, and about cultivating relationships with donors. He talks about working with the OHS board, about OHS staff members, and about his work with the Oregon Humanities Commission and the American Association for State and Local History. He also talks about serving on the American Heritage Publishing Company board, and about his involvement with other museum-related organizations.

In the ninth and final interview session, conducted on December 2, 1996, Vaughan discusses creating a film about the Crimean War of 1853, "The Crimean War: A Clash of Empires." He talks about what he looked for in hiring staff at OHS, discusses the field of public history, and reflects on his accomplishments as OHS executive director. He talks about OHS's role in public education. He closes the interview by discussing the OHS museum collections and the work of George Himes, OHS's first director.

Vaughan, Thomas, 1924-2013

Glass negatives of late nineteenth-century Oregon landscape scenes

  • Org. Lot 1422
  • Collection

Collection consists of 22 glass plate negatives that depict landscape scenes around the state of Oregon in the late nineteenth century. The locations depicted in the negatives include Mount Hood, the Oregon coast, Crater Lake, and the Columbia River Gorge. Of particular note are early photographs of Jump-off Joe, a sandstone rock formation at Nye Beach in Newport, Oregon. Also depicted are scenes of people sturgeon fishing, playing cards, and climbing Mount Hood.

Lorenzo Lorain photographs

  • Org. Lot 1416
  • Collection
  • 1857-1860

Collection consists of salt paper photographic prints attributed to Lorenzo Lorain. The photographs depict scenes around Fort Umpqua and Camp Day during the forced removal of Native peoples from the western region of the Oregon Territory onto the Coast Reservation between 1857 and 1861. The photographs of Fort Umpqua, in Douglas County, Oregon, include the block house, barracks, and support buildings as well as portraits of soldiers and their families. Also included are exterior photographs of plank houses and portraits of unidentified Native American people who were likely members of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, Siuslaw, or Siletz peoples housed near Fort Umpqua on the southern portion of the Coast Reservation. The collection also includes photographs taken by Lorain at Camp Day, a temporary military encampment established in the Klamath Basin in Southern Oregon during the summer and fall of 1860. These photographs depict the camp site, the troops stationed at the camp, and a group photograph of unidentified members of the Klamath and Modoc people at or near the camp. The collection also includes photographs of Portland, Oregon City, and The Dalles, Oregon, which are believed to have been taken by Lorain during his travel from Fort Walla Walla to Fort Umpqua in 1857.

Also included in the collection are two salt paper prints depicting Fort Crook in Shasta County, California, which are attributed to Dr. Edward Perry Vollum. Vollum was stationed at Fort Umpqua during a portion of Lorain’s assignment at the fort.

Oral history interview with Gordon W. Gilkey

  • SR 3149
  • Collection
  • 1998-01-19 - 1998-04-01

This oral history interview with Gordon W. Gilkey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from January 19 to April 1, 1998, as part of the Oregon Historical Society's oral history program. The interview was conducted in seven sessions. The transcript includes additional information provided by Gilkey.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 19, 1998, Gilkey discusses his family background and early life in Albany, Oregon, including his education, his early interest in art, and working on the family ranch. He talks about teaching art classes at Albany College, about spending a summer as a fire lookout in the Santiam National Forest, and about his marriage to Vivian E. Malone. He discusses studying art at the University of Oregon, and also talks about his work on the official book for the 1939 New York World's Fair.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 28, 1998, Gilkey shares his experiences in New York City from 1936 to 1939, and speaks further about his work on the official book for the 1939 New York World's Fair. He discusses the development of his taste in art while in New York, shares anecdotes about Salvador Dali, and talks about the type of art he worked on. He shares his experience as an art professor at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri, and talks about some of his students. He then talks about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II, including his training in Texas, and writing to President Franklin D. Roosevelt to suggest forming a unit to protect art in the European theater.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 4, 1998, Gilkey continues to discuss his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He speaks at length about commanding a unit of soldiers tasked with recovering artworks stolen by the Nazis, as well as collecting Nazi propaganda art and the politics involved in returning recovered art. He talks about the people he met while in Europe.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 11, 1998, Gilkey continues to speak at length about recovering artworks stolen by the Nazis. He talks about his living situation and social life while in Europe, about the many German artists he met, and about meeting displaced European people. He discusses his return to Oregon in 1947 and chairing the art department at Oregon State College, which is now Oregon State University. He speaks about his work as dean to develop the college of humanities into the college of liberal arts, and about developing an international exchange program.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 18, 1998, Gilkey revisits the topic of German artists that he met while recovering stolen art in Europe. He also describes witnessing the Nuremburg trials and learning details about the Holocaust. He talks about how his art style changed after his war experiences, about post-war hostilities with Russia, and about displaced people in Europe. He then talks about some of his artworks and his printmaking process. He speaks further about his work as dean at OSU to develop the college of liberal arts, and about developing an international exchange program. He also talks about his relationship with OSU President Robert W. MacVicar, and about student protests in 1969 and 1970.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on February 25, 1998, Gilkey discusses his retirement from OSU in 1977. He talks about his work as a curator for the Portland Art Museum and as a part time professor at the Museum Art School, which is now the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He talks about the construction of the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Center at the art museum, about his art collection, and about other Portland art collectors. He speaks about some of his OSU students, about some of his colleagues at the Portland Art Museum, and about his personal philosophy.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on April 1, 1998, Gilkey revisits the topic of student protests at OSU in 1969 and 1970. He speaks further about his work at the Portland Art Museum and about his colleagues, and talks about the museum's administration. He discusses his work developing the Oregon Arts Commission, the reasons the Museum Art School left PAM and became the Pacific Northwest College of Art, and about the construction of the Gilkey Center. He describes curating the International Print Show at PAM in 1997 and talks about the future of PAM. He closes the interview by discussing the careers of his students at PNCA, OSU, Stephens College, and Albany College.

Gilkey, Gordon

Karen Beck Skold dissertation papers and interviews

  • Mss 1803
  • Collection
  • 1941-1980

This collection consists of papers and interviews gathered by Karen Beck Skold during research for her 1981 Ph.D. dissertation in sociology at the University of Oregon, entitled "Women Workers and Child Care During World War II: A Case Study of the Portland, Oregon Shipyards."

Digitized materials available online in OHS Digital Collections consist of 26 audio recordings of interviews that Skold conducted with people, predominantly women, who worked at shipyards and in child care in the Portland, Oregon, area during World War II. Most of the people Skold interviewed worked at the Kaiser shipyards, including the Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation yard. A few were employed at Albina Engine Machine Works and Commercial Iron Works; one interviewee worked at the Tacoma-Seattle Shipbuilding Corporation in Washington. The interviewees were primarily welders, ship fitters, and drivers, but also include women who worked as teachers and nurses at child care centers in the shipyards or in war housing projects. Transcripts are available for many interviews, but not all transcripts are complete; only completed transcripts are available online. Also digitized and available online is a recording of a 1980 presentation that Skold delivered in Alameda County, California, titled "The Politics of Child Care during World War II: The Case of the Kaiser Child Service Centers."

Undigitized materials available for use at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library include photocopied reports and articles, mostly regarding children's services in Portland, as well as racism and sex segregation in the shipyards; newspaper clippings regarding Skold's research, 1975-1976; correspondence with sources, 1975-1976; biographical information about women who worked in shipyard child care centers, 1975; minutes of the Women's Advisory Committee, 1943; and a 1941 union agreement between the American Federation of Labor and the Pacific Shipbuilders.

Skold, Karen Beck

Oral history interview with Jessie Laird Brodie

  • SR 9027
  • Collection
  • 1978-02-14 - 1978-03-30

This oral history interview with Dr. Jessie Laird Brodie was conducted by Roberta Watts from February 14 to March 30, 1978. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 14, 1978, Brodie discusses the history of laws regarding birth control and the beginnings of Planned Parenthood in Oregon. She talks about her reasons for going into the medical field, her medical education, and her later focus on providing birth control. She also discusses sex education in schools. She talks about her involvement with the United Nations and the Pan-American Women's Medical Association, including her work with family planning programs in Central and South America.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 30, 1978, Brodie discusses her research into how the birth control pill interacts with sickle-cell anemia. She talks about the success of international family planning programs, as well as opposition they face in some countries. She also discusses the career of her husband, Dr. Francis Walter Brodie. She closes the interview by revisiting the topic of her involvement with the World Health Organization and the Pan-American Women's Medical Association, including her work with family planning programs in Central and South America.

Brodie, Jessie Laird, 1898-1990

Flowers family photographs

  • Org. Lot 865
  • Collection
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of 27 original photographs and copy prints relating to the Flowers family of Portland, Oregon. The photographs date from approximately 1860 to 1955. They are primarily portraits and snapshots of members of the Flowers family, including Allen Ervin Flowers; his wife, Louisa Mathilda Flowers; and their sons, Lloyd A. Flowers, Ralph Perpeno Flowers, Elmer Allen Flowers, and Ervin Milton Flowers. Also included are photographs from several Flowers family business enterprises, including the Flowers family farm, the Flowers automotive repair and sales lot, a jitney bus operated by Ralph Flowers, and beach cottages at Oceanlake, Oregon.

Dixon family photographs

  • Org. Lot 1421
  • Collection
  • 1870-1945

Collection consists of six portraits of members of the Dixon family of Astoria, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, dated from approximately 1870 to 1945. Roscoe Dixon and his wife, Theresa Dixon, were early Black residents of Astoria. Roscoe Dixon owned Roscoe’s First Class Oyster Saloon in Astoria in the 1880s.

Dixon family

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with Edith Green

  • SR 9036
  • Collection
  • 1978-12-18

This oral history interview with Edith Green was conducted by Cynthia Harrison in Portland, Oregon, on December 18, 1978. In this interview, Green discusses her legislative record on women's rights, including the equal pay act of 1963, Title IX, and the Equal Rights Amendment. She speaks about the opposition such legislation faced and how public opinion regarding women's rights has changed over time. She also discusses serving on the Commission on the Status of Women and the report that commission produced. She talks about her impression of the respect for women held by presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. She discusses her efforts toward greater access to loans for higher education and the way that has helped foster the progress of women's rights. She closes the interview by discussing her effort to open the Job Corps program to women.

Green, Edith, 1910-1987

Oral history interview with Don E. Clark

  • SR 1166
  • Collection
  • 1994-08-30 - 1998-03-27

This oral history interview with Don E. Clark was conducted by George M. Joseph at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from August 30, 1994 to March 27, 1998. The interview was conducted over twenty-nine sessions, and the collection includes a transcript. Tape 13 of this interview is missing, and some sections of the interview have been restricted by Clark.

In sessions 1 through 5, Clark discusses his early life and career, including working as a prison guard at San Quentin State Prison in California and then as a deputy for the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office. In sessions 5 and 6, he discusses his 1962 campaign for Multnomah County sheriff. In sessions 7 through 9, he continues to speak about his campaign, and then discusses serving as Multnomah County sheriff from 1962 to 1966. In sessions 10 and 11, he discusses his 1966 re-election campaign for Multnomah County sheriff and his simultaneous campaign for chair of the Multnomah County board of commissioners; serving as assistant director of the Law Enforcement Program at Portland State University from 1967 to 1968, and his 1968 campaign for position 4 on the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners. In sessions 12 through 15, Clark talks about serving on the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners, focusing on the years from 1969 to 1974. In sessions 16 through 20, he talks about campaigning for and serving as chair of the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners from 1975 to 1979. In sessions 21 through 24, Clark discusses serving as county executive from 1979 to 1982, and his 1982 campaign for Oregon governor. In sessions 25 through 29, Clark talks about his activities since leaving office, including serving as executive director of the Burnside Consortium, now known as Central City Concern, from 1984 to 1988, and as executive director of the Housing Authority of Portland, now known as Home Forward, from 1988 to 1992.

Clark, Don E. (Donald Edward), 1933-

Northwest Power Planning Council Oral History Project

  • NWPPC
  • Collection
  • 1998-05-21 - 2004-05-26

This series of interviews was conducted by Michael O'Rourke and Jim Strassmaier as part of the Oregon Historical Society oral history program, beginning in 1998. The purpose of this oral history project was to document the history and purpose of the Northwest Power Planning Council, which is now known as the Northwest Power and Conservation Council.

The Northwest Power Planning Council is a four-state regional planning body formed by Congress through the Northwest Power Act of 1980 to develop and maintain regional conservation and electric power plans and a fish and wildlife program. The council is composed of two representatives from each member state: Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. The mission of the council is "to preserve the benefits of the Columbia River for future generations." The body was originally known as the Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council; the name was shortened to Northwest Power Planning Council in October 1981, and in 2003, the name was changed to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council.

Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.)

Oral history interview with Louis Bunce

  • SR 9323
  • Collection
  • 1977-06-01 - 1977-07-19

This oral history interview with Louis Bunce was conducted by Charles Digregorio from June 1 to July 19, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on June 1, 1978, Bunce discusses his education at the Museum Art School in Portland, Oregon, now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He talks about his experiences during the Depression and his involvement with the Works Progress Administration. He talks about his influences; describes his work in the Portland shipyards during World War II; and shares his artistic process. He talks about his involvement in the Portland Center for Visual Arts; discusses some of his art exhibitions; and talks about working on a commission for the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on July 19, 1978, Bunce reflects on his career as an artist. He talks about his art style and how it changed over the years. He revisits the topic of working on a commission for the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California. He also revisits the topics of his artistic process and art style. He closes the interview by talking about the art community in Portland.

Bunce, Louis, 1907-1983

Oral history interview with Kirby Ross

  • SR 18
  • Collection
  • 1979-12-20

This oral history interview with Kirby Ross was conducted by Charles Pavlovich on December 20, 1979. Ross' son, Kenneth Nelson Ross, and a person identified only as Mr. Johnson were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Ross discusses his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, including capturing enemy soldiers, retrieving bodies of fallen Allied soldiers, and fighting in the trenches. He also talks about where he was during the signing of the armistice. He then talks about his civilian life and serving in the Oregon National Guard before the start of World War I, including being deployed to disrupt efforts by the International Workers of the World to unionize agricultural workers. He then revisits the topic of his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, and describes at length his experiences on the front lines. He closes the interview by discussing where to donate the oral history interview and related materials.

Ross, Kirby S. (Kirby Stewart), 1893-1984

Oral history interview with John G. Wyers

  • SR 2097
  • Collection
  • 1959-03-03 - 1959-03-21

This oral history interview with John G. Wyers was conducted by his son, Teunis J. Wyers, from March 3-21, 1959. The interview was conducted in four sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during the first session.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 3, 1959, Wyers discusses settling in the Klickitat County, Washington, area in 1891. He talks about the people who lived in the areas now known as White Salmon and Underwood in the late 19th century. He describes a ferry, the landscape, and buildings in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 5, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived in the western area of Klickitat County in the late 19th century. He also speaks about conflicts between white emigrants and Native people who lived in the area.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 12, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived near the White Salmon River in the late 19th century, including the areas now known as Trout Lake and Glenwood.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 21, 1959, Wyers talks about the schools, churches, and roads in western Klickitat County in the late 19th century.

Wyers, John G. (John Gerbrand), 1871-1961

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse

  • SR 1713
  • Collection
  • 1991-01-15 - 1991-02-20

This oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse was conducted by Susan L. Smith in West Linn, Oregon, from January 15 to February 20, 1991. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford

  • SR 1500
  • Collection
  • 1987-11-28 - 1987-12-18

This oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford was conducted by Pat Bleakney at Crawford's home in The Dalles, Oregon, from November 28 to December 18, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during session 2 and contributed to the interview questions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 28, 1987, Crawford discusses the history of the Dalles, Oregon. He speaks at length about his family background of homesteading in The Dalles, as well as his early life there. He talks about his education in a one-room schoolhouse; discusses the people who lived in The Dalles during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and talks about his ranch. He also talks about railroad lines, roads, and fences in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 18, 1987, Crawford, Bleakney, and an unidentified woman drive and walk around The Dalles and talk about the history of the land, animals, roads, and buildings as they pass. They also walk along the Dalles Mountain Ranch Loop Hike and talk about the history of the area. Crawford then speaks about his life on a ranch in The Dalles. He also shares his memories of Celilo Falls before it was flooded by The Dalles Dam.

Crawford, Malcolm M. (Malcolm Moody), 1899-1992

Oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim

  • SR 1086
  • Collection
  • 1989-07-26 - 1989-09-13

This oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Heims' home in Portland, Oregon, from July 26 to September 13, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in five sessions. Adam C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 1 and 2; Clara C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 3 and 4; and both were interviewed together in session 5.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 26, 1989, Adam C. Heim discusses his family background, including his Russian and German heritage and his father's career with the Union Pacific Railroad Company. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, including his education and recreational activities. He speaks about working on a sugar beet farm in Idaho; about the Portland harbor; and about his apprenticeship as a machinist for the Union Pacific Railroad.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 2, 1989, Adam C. Heim talks about his siblings, particularly his older brother, John Adams Heim. He continues to discuss his career with the Union Pacific Railroad. He talks about his marriage to Clara C. Heim and about raising their children. He speaks about his experiences living in Huntington, Oregon, during the Depression, including the death of one of his children from spinal meningitis. He also discusses returning to Portland in the 1940s; talks about his children, their families, and their careers; and describes being injured during a robbery.

In the third interview session, conducted on August 29, 1989, Clara C. Heim discusses her family background and early life in North Portland. She talks about her siblings, their families, and their careers. She discusses her health as a child, her education, and working as a telephone operator.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 7, 1989, Clara C. Heim continues to discuss her early life in North Portland. She talks about her marriage to Adam C. Heim, about raising a family, and about her experiences during the Depression. She discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about life in Huntington, and about her political beliefs.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1989, Clara C. Heim and Adam C. Heim discuss living in and raising a family in Huntington and in North Portland during and after World War II. They also talk about the Black population in North Portland. They speak about their relationship with their children, about the changes in the Catholic Church, and about their political beliefs. They close the interview by talking about their recreational activities.

Heim, Adam C. (Adam Clarence), 1902-1995

Oral history interview with Sister John Mary Lane

  • SR 9012
  • Collection
  • 1978-04-17 - 1978-06-06

This oral history interview with Sister John Mary Lane was conducted by Roberta Watts at Marylhurst University in Marylhurst, Oregon, from April 17 to June 6, 1978. Norma Peters was also present. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 17, 1978, Lane discusses her family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, including her early influences and her education. She then talks about her involvement with the Sisters of the Holy Names and about why she chose to become a nun, and describes her spiritual philosophy. She discusses the ways in which the Catholic Church has become more progressive; describes life in a convent; and talks about the role of women in the church.

In the second interview session, conducted on June 6, 1978, Lane revisits the topic of her family background and early life in Spokane, Washington. She also revisits the topic of her involvement with the Sisters of the Holy Names and why she chose to become a nun. She talks about the reasons that fewer women were joining convents at the time of the interview in 1978. She then revisits the topic of life in a convent. She talks about her career as a professor, particularly at Marylhurst University, and discusses stereotypes about nuns. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Lane, John Mary, Sister, 1903-2000

Rick Sanders interviews with relatives

  • SR 2935
  • Collection
  • 1981-06-11 - 1998-03-24

Interviews with Ruth Wilcox, Leam Thomas, and Bradford Tompleman conducted by Rick Sanders from June 11, 1981, to March 24, 1998, as part of genealogical research by Sanders about his family.

The interview with Ruth Wilcox was conducted on June 11, 1981, at her home. The interview is approximately five minutes long. Wilcox was an aunt to Rick Sanders. She talks about her grandmother, who is identified as a member of the Sanders family. She speaks about her family background.

The interview with Leam Thomas was conducted on June 27, 1997. The interview is approximately eight minutes long. Thomas speaks about his family background, about his family real estate business, and about his career as a millworker in California. He also talks about his experiences in India during World War II.

The interview with Bradford Tompleman was conducted on March 25, 1998, in San Francisco, California. The interview is approximately 10 minutes long. Tompleman was a second cousin, once removed, of Rick Sanders. He speaks about his family background.

Sanders, Rick

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter

  • SR 9313
  • Collection
  • 1980-01-25

This oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Salem, Oregon, on January 25, 1980, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Potter discusses her education in art and architecture history at the University of Oregon and Penn State, and talks about some of her professors. She speaks about the origins of her interest in historic preservation, describes her training in public history, and talks about organizations related to historic preservation. She also talks about educational opportunities in public history in Oregon. She discusses her thesis on the topic of Methodist missionary architecture; talks about working as Oregon's first park historian; and speaks at length about her work with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Register of Historic Places. She describes the process of nominating places for the register and talks about the many sites that she added during her tenure as coordinator of the National Register for the State Historic Preservation Office. She speaks about local preservation ordinances in Oregon and other states. She closes the interview by talking about the future of the register.

Potter, Elisabeth Walton, 1939-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 9320
  • Collection
  • 1977-11-29

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Roberta Watts at the Oregonian Building in Portland, Oregon, on November 29, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his early life, education, and early jobs. He speaks about his career as an editorial cartoonist for the Oregonian newspaper; describes his artistic process; and reflects on some of the cartoons he drew. He closes the interview by talking about the training an editorial cartoonist should have.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

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