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Civilian Conservation Corps, Eugene District (Or.) photograph album

  • Album 380
  • Colección
  • 1933-1934

Photograph album documenting the history and activities of the Eugene (Oregon) District of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from May 1933 to May 1934. The album was assembled by Leo R. T. Burton of the Skinner Butte Camp for the Headquarters Detachment and contains photographs of district camps and surrounding scenery, construction activities, and CCC officers and personnel. Also includes maps of each camp, monthly service reports, and work progress reports. Includes camps at Belknap, Bradford, Brice Creek, Cape Creek, Coquille, Crane Prairie, Devils Flat, Drew, Fall Creek, Gunter, Loon Lake, Mapleton, Maury, McKinley, Melrose, Oakridge, Powers, Reedsport, Remote, Rigdon, Seven-Mile Hill, Sisters, Sitkum, Steamboat, Tyee, Walker, and Wolf Creek.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Helen L. Thompson and Mary C. Baker

  • SR 9562
  • Colección
  • 1976-10-27

This oral history interview with sisters Helen L. Thompson and Mary C. Baker was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on October 27, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Thompson and Baker discuss their family background, including the Huntington, Holman, and Malarkey families, who arrived in Portland in the mid-19th century. They talk about family businesses, including the Holman Transfer Company; and share stories about their grandparents' life in early Portland. They discuss their early lives in the Portland Heights neighborhood. They talk about people who lived in the neighborhood, about their education at Ainsworth School and at Lincoln High School, and about their childhood activities. They close the interview by discussing how the role of women in society has changed over the 20th century.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Louise H. Martin

  • SR 9558
  • Colección
  • 1976-07-21

This oral history interview with Louise H. Martin was conducted by Ruth M. Powers in Vancouver, Washington, on July 21, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Charles Digregorio was also present.

In this interview, Martin discusses her family background and early life in Alaska; Oregon City, Oregon; and Spokane, Washington. She describes visits to her relatives' house in Oregon City, which is now known as the William L. Holmes House, or the Rose Farm.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Helen H. Gamble and Harriet H. Cass

  • SR 9555
  • Colección
  • 1976-04-22

This oral history interview with sisters Helen H. Gamble and Harriet H. Cass was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on April 22, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. Henry C.C. Stevens was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Gamble and Cass speak at length about their family background and describe how their parents came to Portland. They talk about their early life in the Portland Heights neighborhood, including participating in social events at Pittock Mansion, their childhood recreational activities, and people who lived in the neighborhood. They also discuss the prevalence of water springs in the Portland Heights area.

Sin título

June D. Drake photographs

  • Org. Lot 678
  • Colección
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of approximately 2,918 original photographic prints and 3,800 original glass and acetate negatives taken by photographer June D. Drake of Silverton, Oregon, as well as 3,042 copy prints made by the Oregon Historical Society from the original negatives. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs that Drake took of various towns in Oregon, including Silverton, Mount Angel (including Mount Angel Abbey), and Salem, Oregon, from approximately 1900-1953. These photographs depict street scenes, businesses, schools, churches, and other town buildings, as well as significant events and celebrations. There are also a number of photographs that Drake took of the area that became Silver Falls State Park, as well as a large number of portrait photographs taken by Drake from about 1900-1952, including both studio and informal portraits.

Other subjects represented in the collection include transportation and agriculture in Oregon; the lumber industry around Silverton, including the Silver Falls Timber Company and the Silverton Lumber Company; Homer Davenport and his family in Silverton; the Chemawa Indian School near Silverton, and other portraits of Native Americans from the area; the military in Oregon, including the Oregon State Militia during World War I and World War II; and photographs of animals. The collection also includes five photograph albums; of note is an album titled "A History of Silverton, Oregon, and its environs," which contains detailed descriptions from 1863 to the 1930s, and includes places of business, worship, and study, among other scenes. There are also a number of photographs of various artifacts and other objects collected by Drake to document the history of Silverton.

Photographs in this collection that date prior to 1900 were originally taken by other photographers, including Silverton photographer William L. Jones, and reprinted by June D. Drake, who owned many of Jones's negatives.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Alice T. Biddle

  • SR 9543
  • Colección
  • 1976-09-21

This oral history interview with Alice T. Biddle was conducted by Charles Digregorio in Vancouver, Washington, on September 21, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Henry C. C. Stevens was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Biddle discusses her family background, and her early life in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland. She talks about prominent families who lived in the neighborhood, about her childhood recreational activities, and about daily life in the early 20th century. She also talks about the medical practice of her father, Ernest Fanning Tucker.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Robert L. Beebe

  • SR 9541-5
  • Colección
  • 1976-09-30

This oral history interview with Robert L. Beebe was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on September 30, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Beebe speaks about the history of the Beebe and Livingstone families, and talks about his affluent childhood in Portland, Oregon, including spending summers in Gearhart. He describes how Portland changed during the 20th century. He also talks about his son's interest in falconry.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Mildred B. Engdahl and Marion F. Kingery

  • SR 9535
  • Colección
  • 1977-06-09

This oral history interview with Mildred B. Engdahl and Marion F. Kingery was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Engdahl's home in Portland, Oregon, on June 9, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Henry C. C. Stevens was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Engdahl discusses her work as director of the Portland Civic Theatre from 1927 to 1929. She describes how she came into that position and talks about shows that were performed during her tenure. Kingery talks about her acting career with the theater. Engdahl discusses her return as director in 1954 and talks about how the theater had changed. She also discusses her work directing plays for children. Both Engdahl and Kingery talk about actors they worked with at the Portland Civic Theatre. Engdahl closes the interview by discussing her work as an author.

Sin título

Land Program Recreational Project, Columbia Gorge

  • Coll 927
  • Colección
  • 1935-06

The collection consists of a report with appendices authored by John Yeon, chair of the Pacific Northwest Regional Planning Commission's Columbia Gorge Committee. In the report, Yeon argues in favor of establishing an interstate park in the Columbia River Gorge on both sides of the river; describes specific areas of the Gorge, such as the Cape Horn area and the Beacon Rock area; and discusses lands that would need to be purchased to establish the park. The appendices, which make up the bulk of the collection, include fold-out maps showing areas of the Gorge, population density in Pacific Northwest, railroad facilities in the region, land ownership in the Gorge, and soil types in the Gorge; a list of currently owned properties in the Gorge; lists of delinquent taxes for properties to be purchased; photographs; and copies of statements and correspondence of officials regarding the proposed purchase of lands for a park.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Lorenzo E. Ghiglieri

  • SR 9526
  • Colección
  • 1980-09-25

This oral history interview with Lorenzo E. Ghiglieri was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at Ghiglieri's studio in Portland, Oregon, on September 25, 1980, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Ghiglieri discusses his family background and shares his reasons for moving to Portland, Oregon. He talks about his career as an artist, about the people who taught him, and about how living in the Pacific Northwest influences his art. He speaks about his experience in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, including the art he made as part of his service. He offers his personal definition of sculpture and talks about his favorite sculpting media. He speaks at length about life as an artist in Oregon, lists artists that influenced him, and talks about some of his paintings, including a portrait of President Richard M. Nixon, paintings in the Seventh-day Adventist multimedia presentation "Earth: Theater of the Universe," and portraits of Inuit people. He discusses the inspirations for some of his sculptures, including "Casey's Gold," which depicts a miner holding a nugget of gold, and his sculptures of wildlife. He closes the interview by talking about learning from his mistakes.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Nancie P. Fadeley

  • SR 9522
  • Colección
  • 1981-04-02

This oral history interview with Nancie P. Fadeley was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, on April 2, 1981, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Fadeley discusses her marriage to Ed Fadeley, talks about their reasons for moving to Eugene, Oregon, in 1954, and speaks about raising a family while working as an elementary school teacher. She discusses Ed Fadeley's career as a lawyer and his service in the Oregon State Legislature, and talks about working as his secretary. She then discusses her own service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1971 to 1981, including the challenges she faced as a woman campaigning for office, and how attitudes towards women in politics changed during her legislative career. She talks about legislation she worked on regarding women's rights, including her role in Oregon's ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment, and legislation to improve the social safety net for women. She shares her experience of studying journalism at the University of Oregon in the 1970s, and discusses her failed 1980 re-election campaign. She closes the interview by talking about her role in the passage of SB 100, Oregon's landmark land-use legislation.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Paul S. Wright

  • SR 9520
  • Colección
  • 1981-09-23

This oral history interview with the Reverend Paul S. Wright was conducted by Linda S. Brody at the First Presbyterian Church in Portland, Oregon, on September 23, 1981, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Wright discusses his family background and early life as the son of Presbyterian missionaries in early 20th-century Tebriz, Persia (now Iran). He then talks about his education in Wooster, Ohio, and shares his experiences in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. He discusses his reasons for attending McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, Illinois, and talks about serving as a Presbyterian minister in North Dakota, Minnesota, and Oklahoma. He then speaks at length about his service as minister at the First Presbyterian Church in Portland. He also talks about his involvement with Lewis and Clark College and the Menucha Retreat and Conference Center. He closes the interview by talking about awards and honors he received, and about serving as moderator for the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Thelma O. Williams

  • SR 9515
  • Colección
  • 1982-05-05

This oral history interview with Thelma O. Williams was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at Williams' home in Portland, Oregon, on May 5, 1982, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. The sound quality is very poor.

In this interview, Williams discusses her family background and early life in Des Moines, Iowa, and in Portland, Oregon. She shares her memories of being Portland Rose Festival queen in 1914, and talks about her continued involvement in the annual festival.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Sidney Teiser

  • SR 9509
  • Colección
  • 1977-02-03

This oral history interview with Sidney Teiser was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Teiser's home in Portland, Oregon, on February 3, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Teiser discusses his family background and early life in Virginia, including his experience of being raised by relatives. He speaks about studying law at the University of Virginia and shares his reasons for moving to Portland, Oregon, in 1911. He talks about practicing law in Portland, about cases he has worked on, and about why he enjoys his career as a lawyer. He shares his experiences as a Jew in Portland in the early 20th century, talks about racism in the American Bar Association (ABA), and discusses his work as a historian and author. He talks about founding the Scribes branch of the ABA, also called the American Society of Writers on Legal Subjects, and shares his thoughts about the way lawyers tend to write.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Helen W. Stone

  • SR 9508
  • Colección
  • 1978-10-26

This oral history interview with Helen W. Stone was conducted by Deborah M. Frosaker at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on October 26, 1978, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Stone discusses the legal and political career of her father, Oswald West, and shares her experiences as the daughter of a governor. She discusses Oswald West's involvement in the operations of the Oregon penitentiary and talks about his reputation for theatrics. She describes the family summer home in Cannon Beach. She closes the interview by discussing Oswald West's affiliation with the Democratic Party.

Sin título

Ruth L. Van Beber oral memoir

  • SR 2083
  • Colección
  • 1992-10-12 - 1993-05-07

This oral memoir by Ruth L. Van Beber was recorded from October 12, 1992, to May 7, 1993. The memoir was recorded in twelve sessions.

In the first session, recorded on October 12, 1992, Van Beber introduces her memoir by sharing her reasons for recording her life story. She shares anecdotes about her early life in Albuquerque, New Mexico, including getting her smallpox vaccine at age 5. She then shares anecdotes about her early life in El Paso, Texas, including the transition from horses to cars at the fire department, witnessing racism, and meeting President William Howard Taft. She also talks about working in her father's candy store.

In the second session, recorded on October 24, 1992, Van Beber continues to discuss working in her father's candy store in El Paso, Texas. She describes being regularly beaten by her father; talks about the deaths, injuries, and overall health of her siblings and mother; and discusses her education and her teachers. She shares anecdotes about running away; about spending a few years at the Salvation Army Home for Wayward Girls, including stories about infant deaths and sexual abuse; and about attending business college and working as a secretary for the Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board. She also talks about her marriage to Merton Floyd Stevenson. She shares anecdotes about the Holy Rollers, Chinese people in Texas, and witnessing Pancho Villa purchase guns in El Paso. She describes her experience with tuberculosis, and then talks about her life in Southern California, including bootlegging. She shares anecdotes about visits to San Francisco in the 1920s, a road trip in 1924, and living in Phoenix, Arizona. She describes an especially beautiful peach tree.

In the third session, recorded on November 12, 1992, Van Beber shares anecdotes about living in New York City in the late 1920s and the people she met there, including socialists and people in the gay community.

In the fourth session, recorded on November 13, 1992, Van Beber continues to talk about living in New York City in the late 1920s, including working at a candy counter and her experiences at the beginning of the Depression. She describes hitchhiking across the country in the 1930s.

In the fifth session, recorded on November 14, 1992, Van Beber continues to describe hitchhiking across the country in the 1930s. She talks about her marriage to Rosser Thomas Garrison, about dogs she owned, and about her life in Southern California. She then speaks about homesteading in Oregon.

In the sixth session, recorded on November 22, 1992, Van Beber continues to speak at length about her experiences while homesteading in Oregon. She also talks about working in a prune orchard, about her father's death and funeral, and about growing a vegetable garden.

In the seventh session, recorded on November 25, 1992, Van Beber continues to speak at length about her experiences while homesteading in Oregon. She shares anecdotes about baking bread, about her adopted children, and about building a school. She then talks about abandoning the children.

In the eighth session, recorded on December 14, 1992, Van Beber continues to talk about abandoning her adopted children. She shares anecdotes about working as an in-home nurse in San Francisco, including for a woman who had harmed her baby. She talks about briefly returning to her family in Oregon and about her life and work in Alaska during World War II. She also describes her experiences just after President Franklin D. Roosevelt's declaration of war, talks about her journey to Alaska, and speaks about running a cafe in Kodiak, Alaska. She describes the evacuation of Kodiak.

In the ninth session, recorded on December 15, 1992, Van Beber continues to describe the evacuation of Kodiak during World War II. She then talks about selling her cafe and leaving Kodiak. She shares anecdotes about life on a homestead in Homer, Alaska, including a story about accidentally starting a wildfire. She also talks about living in Seldovia, Alaska. She speaks at length about an afghan she treasured. She talks about the various health problems of Rosser T. Garrison that led them to relocate to Washington.

In the tenth session, recorded on December 22, 1992, Van Beber shares anecdotes about life in Cashmere, Washington, at the end of World War II, including caring for her mother and running another cafe. She revisits the topic of Rosser T. Garrison's problems with his health; shares her experiences after hearing about the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan; and describes the changes in Garrison's behavior as a result of his health issues. She then shares her experiences as a patient in a psychiatric hospital in Washington. She then talks about caring for Garrison after a stroke, about their divorce, and about her subsequent brief marriage with Cecil Carter. She describes remodeling her cafe and home in Cashmere. She discusses working in Bend, Oregon, meeting Chuck Van Beber, and then working in Moab, Utah. She speaks about returning to run the cafe in Cashmere and reconnecting with Chuck Van Beber.

In the eleventh session, recorded on December 27, 1992, Van Beber interrupts the tenth recording session to talk about the reception of her memoir by friends and family, to discuss her open marriages, and to share more anecdotes from her life on a homestead in Oregon. She describes her recent Christmas activities.

In the twelfth and final session, recorded on May 7, 1993, Van Beber shares her feelings upon hearing about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. She talks about returning to Alaska in the 1960s, about an artist she met in Seldovia, Alaska, and about her experiences during the 1964 earthquake. She describes the tsunami that followed. She talks about relocating to Eugene, Oregon.

Sin título

Oral history interview with John H. Steelquist

  • SR 9507
  • Colección
  • 1977-12-08

This oral history interview with John H. Steelquist was conducted by Deborah M. Frosaker at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on December 8, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Steelquist discusses the medical work of his maternal great-grandmother, Catherine Davis, and the pharmaceutical career of his maternal grandfather, Melancthon Marshall Davis, in 19th- and 20th-century Oregon. He talks about his early interest in engineering, about his college experience at Stanford University, and about his reasons for pursuing a career in medicine. He closes the interview by discussing his research on Captain James Cook.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Leo F. Simon

  • SR 9503
  • Colección
  • 1980-02-07

This oral history interview with Leo F. Simon was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on February 7, 1980, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Simon shares his memories of moving to Portland with his family in 1902 and living on homesteads. He talks about his early education. He discusses his early interest in photography, and talks about working in photography studios and later owning his own studio in Portland. He speaks about his involvement with the Audubon Society, the Mazamas, and the Geological Society of the Oregon Country. He describes his work restoring photographs for the Oregon Historical Society. He closes the interview by giving a brief chronology of his photography career.

Sin título

Radio interview with Homer T. Shaver

  • SR 9502
  • Colección
  • 1963-08-14

This radio interview with Homer T. Shaver was conducted by Doug Porter on August 14, 1963, for the Junior Chamber of Commerce evening program, "Mr. Jaycee Report." The interview aired on Portland radio station KWJJ.

In this interview, Shaver discusses his tug and barge business, the Shaver Transportation Company, which operated on the Willamette and Columbia rivers. He talks about the history of the company, about the company's past and present competitors, and about how the industry has changed over the 20th century. He discusses cargo his barges carry, describes the operations of his company, and discusses the future of the Portland harbor.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Homer T. Shaver

  • SR 9501
  • Colección
  • 1976-09-08

This oral history interview with Homer T. Shaver was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Shaver Transportation Company in Portland, Oregon, on September 8, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Shaver speaks at length about his family background and describes the founding of the Shaver Transportation Company. He talks about changes he made to the company when he became assistant manager in 1921. He discusses the company's competitors and talks about how the Depression affected the business. He also describes his experiences working on the construction of a water pipeline in Alaska during the summer of 1909. He closes the interview by talking about his accomplishments.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Jerry F. Cundari

  • SR 1164
  • Colección
  • 2023-08-23

This oral history interview with Jerry F. Cundari was conducted by Kerry Tymchuk in Portland, Oregon, on August 23, 2023. A transcript of the interview is available.

In this interview, Cundari discusses his early career as a golf caddy at the Portland Golf Club and describes his experiences playing in golf tournaments as a teenager. He speaks about golf players he competed against, and about titles he won. He talks about his college experience at the University of Oregon, particularly playing golf for the university team. He discusses continuing to play golf while working for the family insurance company, Cundari Insurance, and while raising a family, and shares his reasons for never pursuing a career as a professional golfer. He talks about professional golfers he played with, including Arnold Palmer, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus. He closes the interview by talking about tournaments he played in as a senior golfer.

Sin título

Oral history interview with John D. Scott

  • SR 9500
  • Colección
  • 1976-11-03

This oral history interview with John D. Scott was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on November 3, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Scott discusses his family background, and also the family background of his wife, Jessie M. Scott. He then talks about the history of the Mazamas, a mountaineering organization in Oregon, and about his experiences climbing Mount Hood. He closes the interview by discussing the naval career of his father, Bernard Orme Scott.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Hilde Schmoll

  • SR 9499
  • Colección
  • 1979-03-26

This oral history interview with Hilde Schmoll was conducted by Portland architect Alfred Staehli at Schmoll's home in Portland, Oregon, on March 26, 1979, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Schmoll discusses the history and design of her home in the Mount Tabor neighborhood of Portland, which was designed by architect A. E. Doyle and previously owned by the haute couture dressmakers May Shogren and Ann Shogren. She also briefly talks about the violin-making business of her husband, Rudolph F. Schmoll.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Lewis L. McArthur

  • SR 9469
  • Colección
  • 1982-04-16 - 1982-06-08

This oral history interview with Lewis L. McArthur was conducted by Nancie Fadeley in two sessions, on April 16, 1982, and June 8, 1982. The second interview session was recorded at the Ray F. Becker Company. The interview was conducted for a radio segment that may have aired on the radio station KWAX in Eugene, Oregon.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 16, 1982, McArthur discusses his research on Oregon place names for the book "Oregon Geographic Names." He also talks about the career of his father, Lewis A. McArthur, and about Lewis A. McArthur's work on the early editions of the book. He shares information about the origins of several Oregon place names, including Granite, Noti, Oneonta, and Bear Springs. He discusses the work of the Oregon Geographic Names Board. He talks about the numerous Oregon place names that include "hell," shares theories about the origins of the name "Oregon," and discusses the history of some military-related place names.

In the second interview session, conducted on June 8, 1982, McArthur discusses his career as an industrial engineer for the Ray F. Becker Company. He gives a tour of the company, describes equipment the company uses to produce sheet metal, and talks about the production process. He then briefly discusses his early life in Portland, his work history, and his marriage to Joyce A. Clark. He speaks about his work on "Oregon Geographic Names," about his plans for future editions of the book, and about working on the book with his father. He closes the interview by discussing the complications in changing existing place names.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Dick K. Harmon

  • SR 2459
  • Colección
  • 1998-12-15 - 1998-12-22

This oral history interview with Dick K. Harmon was conducted by Kay Reid in two sessions, on December 15 and December 22, 1998, as part of the Legacy of Hope: Catholics and Social Justice Project, which collected interviews with Catholic clergy and social justice activists in Oregon about their work on social action in the Roman Catholic tradition.

In the first interview session, conducted on December 15, 1998, Harmon discusses his involvement with the Portland Organizing Project, an alliance of churches in Portland, Oregon, that was founded in 1985 to further social justice. He talks about the organization's work lobbying the Oregon Legislature to fund worker training programs, and about how the organization changed in the late 1990s. He speaks about the history of the post-World War II labor movement and how changes in the working class lifestyle are related to changes in social justice organizing by churches. He shares his thoughts about the importance of the church to American social life. He discusses his family, their lives, and their careers. He speaks about pollution in the Willamette River and talks about solutions to the issue that would also create jobs.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 22, 1998, Harmon discusses his work in family therapy, speaks at length about the Portland Organizing Project's work on affordable housing during the development of Portland's River District in 1995, and describes the organization's relationship with journalists. He reflects on his accomplishments as a social justice organizer in Chicago, Illinois, in Brooklyn, New York, and in Portland, Oregon. He shares his reasons for moving to Portland in the mid-1990s. He describes how he became involved in social justice organizing while in college in the 1950s, talks about the staff and volunteers of the Portland Organizing Project, and discusses the organization's current focus on public education. He closes the interview by talking about the growth of the POP.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Dick K. Harmon

  • SR 2406
  • Colección
  • 1995-12-29

This oral history interview with Dick K. Harmon was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on December 29, 1995, as part of the Legacy of Hope: Catholics and Social Justice Project, which collected interviews with Catholic clergy and social justice activists in Oregon about their work on social action in the Roman Catholic tradition.

In this interview, Harmon discusses his family background and early life in Colorado, and talks about his interest in learning about the roots of violence in American culture. He describes his college experience at the University of Chicago, and describes how he became involved with the Industrial Areas Foundation. He speaks at length about his work as a social justice organizer for the IAF and later for the Brooklyn Ecumenical Cooperatives. He talks about the communities he worked in, about the people he worked with, and about the relationship between his work and his Christian faith. He shares his opinion on the organization and rules of the Catholic Church. He then speaks at length about his work with the Portland Organizing Project in Oregon, an alliance of churches founded in 1985 to further social justice. He closes the interview by sharing how his social justice work helped him to process his abusive childhood, and by discussing the concept of sin.

Sin título

United States District Court Oral History Project

  • USDCHS
  • Colección
  • 1966-2020 (bulk 1984-2008)

Since 1984, the Oregon Historical Society has partnered with the United States District Court of Oregon Historical Society to interview judges, lawyers and other legal professionals affiliated with that Court.
With an appeal rate at around 10%, the decisions made by the District Court of Oregon have been deeply influential on the laws and peoples of the state. It has presided over decisions on public land disputes and fishing rights, as well as civil rights and law enforcement. The stories of the people that make up this judicial body provide a valuable tool for helping the public understand the pivotal role the court has had on Oregon’s history.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Margaret Biddle Parker

  • SR 9484
  • Colección
  • 1984-03-15

This oral history interview with Margaret Biddle Parker was conducted by Elisabeth W. Potter and Alfred Staehli in Portland, Oregon, on March 15, 1984, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Parker discusses the career of her husband, Portland architect Jamieson Parker. She discusses how the 1929 stock market crash affected his business, talks about his work for the Historic American Buildings Survey and the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s, and speaks about some of the buildings he designed. She also talks about her children, their family, and their careers; and about her mother, Margaret Burrell Biddle. She discusses the cause of Jamieson Parker's death in 1939. She closes the interview by talking about Alfred Parker.

Sin título

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