Showing 4693 results

Collections
Multnomah County (Or.)
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

4671 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Diners at luncheon in honor of officers of USS Constitution, Laurelhurst Park, Portland

Photograph showing people seated at a long table during an outdoor luncheon honoring officers of the frigate USS Constitution on August 9, 1933. The luncheon was held at Laurelhurst Park in Portland. The Constitution and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A story about the luncheon, headlined “Citizens Honor Officers From Old Ironsides,” was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 9, 1933. Also see image No. 371N3723.

Diners at luncheon in honor of officers of USS Constitution, Laurelhurst Park, Portland

Photograph showing people dining at long tables during an outdoor luncheon honoring officers of the frigate USS Constitution on August 9, 1933. The luncheon was held at Laurelhurst Park in Portland. The Constitution and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon journal on August 9, 1933, under the headline “Dinner in Park Fetes ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “Civic luncheon, preceding dedication of marker to veteran of Constitution, is held under towering firs in Laurelhurst park. At the head table were Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley and Lieutenants D. W. Lyon and W. J. Dean and Dan E Gould, general chairman of program. Descendants of heroic figures of Constitution’s history were introduced.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the luncheon. See related image Nos. 371N3723, also taken at the luncheon, and 371N3725, which may depict the marker dedication referred to in the caption for this photograph.

Group at tea during visit of USS Constitution to Portland

Portrait of the commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, members of his family, and others at a tea on Friday, August 18, 1933. The tea was held during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and its crew. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Group at Friday tea, in front row from left are Phylis Drake and Grace Gulliver and in rear row Marion Bass, Commander [Louis J.] Gulliver, Mrs. Gulliver and Marjorie Bass.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Dedication of marker at site of William Johnson’s cabin, Southwest Macadam Avenue and Curry Street, Portland?

Photograph showing two flag bearers standing on either side of a stone marker, facing to the right. Unidentified people are standing in a row behind them. The photograph was probably taken on August 9, 1933, and depicts the dedication of a marker at the site of the first cabin on the west side of Portland. The dedication ceremony followed a luncheon in honor of officers from the frigate USS Constitution, who were in Portland as part of a national tour by the Constitution and crew. In a story on August 9, 1933, the Oregon Journal gave the following information about the dedication ceremony: “After the luncheon representatives of the patriotic societies went to Southwest Macadam avenue and Curry street, where the marker on the site of the first cabin on Portland’s West side, erected by William Johnson, a veteran of the battle between the Constitution and British frigate Guerriere August 19, 1812, was dedicated by the Daughters of 1812. The dedication program opened with an invocation by Mrs. James H. Huddleson, chaplain of the Daughters of 1812. Members of Boy Scout troop No. 19 formed the patrol and guard of honor for the occasion. Scouts Miln [sic] Gillespie and Donald Kirby were colorbearers, and scout Erwin Lesser was bugler.” The story reported that the ceremony included a talk by Lewis A. McArthur on the history of William Johnson’s career and remarks by Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer of the USS Constitution. The Journal reported that the marker was unveiled by Mary Katherine Keffer, a descendant of Johnson, and that it consisted of “a bronze plaque on a granite stone taken from the lower section of Canyon road.”

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting a plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Gets Plaque.” The photograph had the following caption: “Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, commanding the frigate Constitution, with a plaque commemorating the visit of the historic ship in Portland harbor. The presentation was made at 10:30 a.m. Thursday on board the ship.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the presentation of the plaque. See related image Nos. 371N3729 and 371N3739.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing three unidentified men watching as Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presents a bronze plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, the Oregon Journal published a story about the presentation and a related photograph, image No. 371N3729. According to the story, the plaque commemorated the ship’s visit to Portland, and Carson was accompanied by “City Commissioners Riley, Bean, and Bennett,” who may be the three unidentified men shown in this photograph. Also see related image No. 371N3739.

Samuel M. Mears looking at rope aboard frigate USS Constitution

Photograph showing Samuel M. Mears holding a loop of thick rope aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22 as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Samuel M. Mears, president of Portland Cordage company and midshipman on the Constitution in 1871, is an honored visitor. He gave $600 worth of cordage for rerigging the ship.” The photograph of Mears was probably taken earlier, on Friday, August 18, 1933; his visit to the ship is mentioned in a story published on Page 2 of that day’s Oregon Journal. The story, describing activities on the ship on August 18, reported that Mears had lived on the Constitution for nine months as a midshipman in the naval academy. Image note: Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3736, which were published with the photograph of Mears.

Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

Major George E. Sandy presents U. S. history books for library of USS Constitution

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution, showing Major George E. Sandy (third from left) presenting a two-volume set of James Truslow Adams’ “March of Democracy” for the ship’s library on August 18, 1933. The presentation occurred during the ship’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day of the presentation. The photograph had the headline “Democracy Marches on ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” It had the following caption: “Presentation of a set of United States history books to the library of the frigate Constitution Friday morning by major George E. Sandy on behalf of Rose City post No. 35, American legion. Left, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Metress; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding the ship; Major Sandy, presenting the books; Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, and Marine Sergeant Billett.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Frigate Gets History She Helped Make.” The story gave the following explanation about the gift of the books: “When the ship arrived in Portland, it was discovered that the library issued by the bureau of navigation did not have a history of the United States or an English dictionary. Lieutenant David W. Tolson commented on the lack and the embarrassment caused at times when questions on points of history were asked. The comment was overheard by Sandy, who set about to rectify the condition.”

Seaman G. B. Howe of USS Constitution and Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution on August 18, 1933, showing Seaman G. B. Howe and retired Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China. The photograph was taken during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day the picture was taken. The photograph accompanied a story that provided the following information: “Among the several interesting events on board the beloved veteran of the navy [the USS Constitution] at her Swan island berth today was identification of the member of the crew promised a ‘real party’ in Portland by Lieutenant Commander J. Carlos Ghormley, U. S. N. R., when he visited the ship at Washington navy yard December 8, 1932. At that time Dr. Ghormley had two Chinese coins, exactly alike. He gave one to a sailor with instructions to match it with the other on arrival in Portland, and that the sailor would be royally entertained. Boarding the ship this morning Dr. Ghormley matched coins with G. B. Howe, seaman, second class, and royal yardman of the ship. Howe is from Lowell, Mass., and enlisted on board the Constitution. Immediately after identification of the coins permission was granted by Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, for Howe to go on liberty with Dr. Ghormley.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver presenting picture of USS Constitution to Mayor Joseph K. Carson

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding up a framed picture depicting the frigate USS Constitution in Portland with the St. Johns Bridge in the background. The photograph was taken at Portland City Hall on August 26, 1933. The Constitution visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Gulliver, commanding officer of the Constitution, returned to Portland while the ship was visiting Longview, Washington, to present the picture of the frigate to the city. The picture was created by artist Duncan Gleason of Hollywood, California.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver? and Marine guard aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing a U. S. Navy officer saluting a Marine guard as they present arms aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph may show the honors marking the return of the Constitution’s commanding officer, Commander Louis J. Gulliver, on August 11, 1933, after a 30-day leave. Gulliver’s return occurred during the Constitution and crew’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” Also see image Nos. 371N3713, 371N3718, and 371N3719.

Officers of USS Constitution presenting miniature cannon to Oregon Journal writer Wallace S. Wharton

Photograph showing (from left) Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution; Wallace S. Wharton, a writer for the Oregon Journal; and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer of the Constitution. They are standing in a row aboard the ship, and Gulliver is smiling and holding a tiny wooden cannon. The photograph was taken in August 1933, while the Constitution and crew were in Portland for three weeks as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Wallace S. Wharton (center), staff member of The Journal, receives miniature cannon from old timbers of ship in appreciation of articles written on frigate’s visit. Presentation is made by Commander Gulliver with Lieutenant Commander Hartley looking on approvingly.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3730, which were published with this photograph.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver greeting two unidentified men aboard USS Constitution?

Photograph showing a U. S. Navy officer greeting two unidentified men. The officer is probably Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, and the photograph was probably taken in Portland in August 1933, during a three-week visit by the ship and crew as part of a national tour.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding a bronze plaque commemorating the visit of the frigate USS Constitution to Portland. The photograph was taken during a ceremony aboard the frigate on Thursday, August 10, 1933, in which Carson presented the plaque to the ship’s executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (second from right). Several unidentified men are watching Carson; the man at left may be City Commissioner Earl Riley. A story about the presentation, headlined “City Presents Bronze Plaque to ‘Ironsides,’ ” was published in the Oregon Journal the day of the ceremony. See related image Nos. 371N3728 and 371N3729.

Presentation of Oregon state flag to crew of USS Constitution?

Photograph showing two unidentified women and four U. S. Navy officers standing in a row on a ship, holding a flag depicting a beaver. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, at a reception aboard the frigate USS Constitution after the ship arrived in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. In a front-page story on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported the following about the ceremony: “The outstanding feature of the reception was presentation of the official flag of Oregon to Commander [Henry] Hartley and the ship by the Daughters of 1812. Mrs. George H. Root, president, made the speech of presentation telling how glad the people of Portland were to have the privilege of visiting the great naval shrine and welcoming the officers and men. Miss Esther Allen Jobes, granddaughter of the founding president of the organization, presented the flag to the commander.” Also see image No. 371N0473.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N3707. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Veterans protest? at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of a group of unidentified veterans wearing costumes and posing with a wagon full of hay at Multnomah Civic Stadium in Portland. On the side of the wagon is sign that reads “Voiture 112 / Bellingham Wash.” The photograph may have been taken at a rally or protest related to bonus payments for World War I veterans. The man at center left is holding a sign reading “Andy Mellon’s Bonus,” probably referring to Andrew Mellon, who served as United States treasury secretary.

Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, Mayor George L. Baker, and three unidentified men at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of five men standing in a row on the field at Multnomah Civic Stadium during an event. In front of them is an unidentified Portland police officer. The man at left is Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, and the second man from left is Portland Mayor George L. Baker. The other three men are unidentified.

Earl Riley, Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) Earl Riley, Oregon first lady Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at the dedication of the new Waverly Baby Home building in Portland on November 28, 1931. They are standing in front of the building’s cornerstone, which has not yet been placed, and Meier is holding a bouquet of flowers. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3021 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “From left, Earl Riley, city commissioner; Mrs. Julius L. Meier receiving bouquet from L. E. Kern, president of the board of trustees of the Waverly Baby home, and State Treasurer Rufus C. Holman, at the dedication of the new $115,000 home for parentless waifs Saturday. Riley represented the city and Holmes for the state.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Oregon first lady Grace Meier with cornerstone at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing Oregon first lady Grace Meier posing with a trowel and the cornerstone of the new Waverly Baby Home building at a dedication ceremony on November 28, 1931. Inscribed on the cornerstone are the words “THE BABY HOME / ERECTED 1931.” A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3009 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “Mrs. Meier laying the cornerstone.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Dedication of giant air-mail box at 6th and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a small crowd at the dedication of a huge air-mail collection box on the corner of what is now Southwest Sixth Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. Standing in front of the box and holding a large prop key are Dr. L. T. Jones (left), president of the Portland Exchange Club, and John M. Jones, Portland postmaster. The box was set up by the exchange club to collect mail that would be carried east by the Varney air-mail service. The box was equipped with a loudspeaker to broadcast messages about air mail. The dedication took place on September 3, 1929.

Results 4397 to 4424 of 4693