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Cracker Eagle Gold Mining Company records

  • Mss 55
  • Collection
  • 1903-1905

Collection consists of corporate records for the Cracker Eagle Gold Mining Company, operating in Baker County, Oregon. Records date from 1903 to 1905 and include expense accounts, business transactions, and stockholders' correspondence.

Cracker Eagle Gold Mining Company

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 9432
  • Collection
  • 1978-01-31

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Charles Digregorio in Edwards' office in the Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon, on January 31, 1978. Roberta Watts was also present. In this interview, Edwards discusses his career as secretary and law clerk in the Oregon Legislature. He describes the changes in the Legislature during his career; his opinion on capital punishment; the 1935 fire that destroyed the Capitol building, and the construction of the new building. He discusses working as secretary for Otto Paulus, Governor Charles Sprague, and Richard Neuberger, as well as being fired by Governor Mark Hatfield. He also talks about legislation he had some hand in, including retirement benefits for legislative staff. He talks about the difficulty of recordkeeping when more and more legislative business is conducted via telephone. He also discusses the history of deficit spending and budgeting in Oregon. He closes the interview by talking about his staff.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 9431
  • Collection
  • 1982-05-14

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on May 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Edwards discusses his duties regarding the selection of horses as a civilian agent for the Remount Service during World War II. He talks about the history of the American Remount Service and how the horses were used during both war and peacetime. He also discusses his duties selecting dogs for military use. He then talks about serving on the Oregon Racing Commission under Governor Douglas O. McKay after the war. He briefly describes lobbying for the Oregon State Cattlemen's Association and working as chief clerk of the Oregon House of Representatives. He then speaks at length about his experiences as secretary of the Senate. He talks about the changes in the Legislature during the 20th century, including salaries, staff sizes, and session length. He tells the story of discovering that the federal government owed a debt to Oregon dating back to the Civil War. Edwards talks about the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935, the places where the Legislature convened afterwards, and the construction of the new Capitol. He closes the interview by talking a little about some of the governors he served under.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with George S. Donnelly

  • SR 462
  • Collection
  • circa 1970

This oral history interview with George Donnelly was conducted by Jack P. Steiwer at Donnelly's home near Richmond, Oregon, around 1970. Bill Asher was also present.

In this interview, Donnelly discusses his father, Roderick Nelson Donnelly, and his father's role in the development of Wheeler County. He talks about his own life in the Richmond area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including sheep ranching, the history of the town, and people and businesses in the area. He also briefly shares his memories of the flood of 1911, which washed away a portion of Richmond. He talks about hunting and fishing in the area, recreational activities, and food storage. Steiwer closes the interview by reciting the history of the Donnelly family.

Donnelly, George S. (George Stanley), 1888-1973

Oral history interview with Howard C. Stearns

  • SR 460
  • Collection
  • 1980-01-21 - 1980-01-23

This oral history interview with Howard C. Stearns was conducted by Leon Speroff from January 21-23, 1980. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 21, 1980, Stearns discusses his career as a member of the University of Oregon Medical School faculty, including other members of the faculty, running his own medical practice on the side, and his promotion to department chair in 1945. He also talks about his reasons for leaving the university in 1957. He then discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon; his service in the Merchant Marines during World War I; and his experience studying entomology at Oregon State University, and medicine at the University of Oregon Medical School. He talks about practicing obstetrics and gynecology and describes some of the common procedures he conducted, including some graphic descriptions of childbirth.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1980, Stearns continues to discuss practicing obstetrics and gynecology. He talks about his service as chair of the of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oregon Medical School. He then discusses his children, their careers, and their families. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland and teaching obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oregon Medical School.

Stearns, Howard C. (Howard Cecil), 1900-1985

Oral history interview with Emery Neale

  • SR 339
  • Collection
  • 1988-02-10

This oral history interview with Emery Neale was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on February 10, 1988. In this interview, Neale discusses his family background and early life, including his early interest in tennis. He talks about tennis tournaments at the Irvington Tennis Club, building indoor tennis courts at the club, and his service on the Irvington Tennis Club board. He also briefly talks about Walter Goss, the president of the Irvington Tennis Club, as well as racial discrimination at tennis clubs. He discusses his career as a tennis player, including taking lessons, playing at Stanford University, and playing in national tournaments. He talks about his education at Stanford University and working as a teacher after graduating. He describes how his experience during World War II affected him. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with the People to People tennis tournaments.

Neale, Emery W. (Emery William), 1921-1994

Oral history interview with Howard C. Reed

  • SR 172
  • Collection
  • 1988-07-30

This oral history interview with Howard C. Reed was conducted by an unidentified man on July 30, 1988. In this interview, Reed discusses a giant brown trout that was caught at Paulina Lake in 1965, which weighed 35 pounds, 9 ounces. He also talks about the history of Paulina Lake Lodge, which his family had owned since 1929.

Reed, Howard C. (Howard Charles), 1913-2000

Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway photographs

  • Org. Lot 78
  • Collection
  • 1890 - 1979

Photographs taken for the Burlington Northern Railroad and the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway. Subjects include railroad stations and yards; railroad tracks; trains; train wrecks; railroad bridge construction and maintenance; and railroad personnel, throughout Oregon and Washington. There are also photographs of various towns and landscapes Oregon, Washington, and California, through which the railroads passed, including images of the construction of the Bonneville Dam, the Columbia River and Columbia River Gorge, Mount Hood, and other mountains and lakes. The collection additionally contains photographs of people engaged in various recreations, including hiking, as well as a number of photographs relating to agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. There is also one photograph album containing interior and exterior photographs of the Reserved Seat Coach-Cafe Car of the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway in 1939. Photographers include Photo-Art Comercial Studios and Arthur M. Prentiss of Portland, Or., among many others.

Oral history interview with Richard Sundeleaf, by Linda Dodds and Al Staehli

  • SR 9311
  • Collection
  • 1982-11-02 - 1982-11-23

Sundeleaf discusses family background and early life in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, his experiences studying architecture at the University of Oregon, and his career as an architect. He also discusses some of the buildings he designed, contemporary architects and his involvement in the Historic American Buildings Survey.

Sundeleaf, Richard, 1900-1987

Portland General Electric Photograph Collection

  • Org. Lot 151
  • Collection
  • 1880 - 1965

Negatives documenting company activities, including electrical infrastructure, employees, power generation and distribution throughout Portland, the Willamette Valley and the Oregon Cascade Range. Additional general images include streetcars and trains, street lighting, power line installation, Rose Festival floats, office buildings, car barns and bridges. Of particular note are dam building projects at Bull Run and along the Clackamas River (1910-1930), and early electric stations in Oregon City at Willamette Falls.

Portland General Electric Company

Oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer

  • SR 70
  • Collection
  • 1982-12-06

This oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer was conducted by Terence O'Donnell on December 6, 1982. The interview was conducted as research for O'Donnell's book "An Arrow in the Earth: General Joel Palmer and the Indians of Oregon."

In this interview, Palmer discusses his ancestor Joel Palmer, who served as superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Oregon Territory from 1853 to 1856. He reads from family documents, letters, and newspaper articles regarding Joel Palmer's life and career and talks about treaties with Native Americans that Joel Palmer helped to negotiate. He discusses the Native American reservation system, and Joel Palmer's role in its formation. He talks about Palmer family history, particularly the overland journey of Joel Palmer to Oregon on the Barlow Road in 1847. He also briefly discusses his own early life in eastern Washington and southern Idaho.

Palmer, Omar C. (Omar Clyde), 1908-2003

Conversations with Waverley Country Club golf caddies

  • SR 89
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-07

These conversations with golf caddies at the Waverley Country Club in Portland, Oregon, were conducted by C. Edwin Francis on August 7, 1985, for his book "Waverley Country Club, 1896-1987." The caddies who were interviewed included Tony Roberts, Neil Peer, Charles Reimer, Bob McKendrick, Warren Munro, Greg Millett, and Iver Unis. In these conversations, they share stories about their experiences as golf caddies at Waverley Country Club.

Francis, C. Edwin

Oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler

  • SR 44-1
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-27

This oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler was conducted at the home of Peggy Wetzler. The first session was conducted by Bernice Pluchos of the Camas-Washougal Historical Society on February 27, 1981, and the second session was conducted by Peggy Wetzler on February 28, 1981. The sound quality is extremely poor.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 27, 1981, Dalton discusses her family background and early life on Government Island, Oregon, including life on the family ranch, transportation, and her social life. She also briefly talks about her wedding to Louis Stanis Dalton in 1907. Wetzler also discusses her family background and early life in Long Beach, Washington.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 28, 1981, Dalton continues discussing her early life on Government Island, including her education, other families that lived on the island, and floods. She also describes the house she lived in. Wetzler and Dalton talk about taking ferry boats to and from Government Island, catching crabs on the beach, and life in Long Beach, Washington. Wetzler closes the tape with a brief narrative of Rose Iva Dalton's family history and additional historical information about Government Island and Long Beach.

Dalton, Rose Iva, 1881-1984

Oral history interview with Clara May Patterson

  • SR 44
  • Collection
  • 1980-06-11

This oral history interview with Clara May Patterson was conducted by Mary Cowan and Ruth Kinon on June 11, 1980. The interviewers are not identified in the audio, so their names are inferred from the handwriting on the physical audiocassette.

In this interview, Patterson describes her experience singing in the choir at the Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905. She then discusses her family background and early life in Camas, Washington, including the medical career of her father, Theophilius C. Humphrey, and the houses her family lived in. She then talks about her later life in Portland, Oregon, including raising a family. She closes the interview by describing the overland journey of the Humphrey family from Iowa to Oregon in 1852.

Patterson, Clara May, 1882-1982

Franklin Historical Society Oral History Program

  • SR FHS
  • Collection
  • 2018-05-20 - ?

This is a series of oral history interviews produced by students at Franklin High School, as part of the Franklin Historical Society program. The program aims to preserve the oral history projects of Advanced Placement (AP) History students at Franklin High School in Portland.

At the end of each school year, students create a museum to display their final projects, many of which include oral history interviews. An online exhibit of some of these museum displays can be found at https://sites.google.com/view/franklin-historical-society/home

Franklin High School (Portland, Or.)

Oral history interview with John A. Silvertooth

  • SR 463
  • Collection
  • 1970

This oral history interview with John A. Silvertooth was conducted by Jack P. Steiwer at Silvertooth's store in Antelope, Oregon, around 1970. In this interview, Silvertooth discusses the history of Antelope and the Wasco County area. He talks about his family background and early life in Antelope in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He talks about the businesses he owned in Antelope, particularly the Idle Hours Tavern and a museum that burned down in 1964. He also briefly talks about his unsuccessful campaign for the Oregon Legislature. He speaks about homesteaders in the area, sheep and cattle ranching, and some of the families that lived in the area. Silvertooth tells a story about a bar brawl in his tavern; talks about some of the items in his store where the interview took place; and shares his memories of early automobiles and railroad lines in the area. He also talks about the origins of place names in Wasco County. He closes the interview by discussing running his tavern during Prohibition.

Silvertooth, John A. (John Addison), 1885-1972

Oral history interview with Kirby S. Ross

  • SR 18
  • Collection
  • 1979-12-20

This oral history interview with Kirby S. Ross was conducted by Charles Pavlovich on December 20, 1979. Ross' son, Kenneth Nelson Ross, and a person identified only as Mr. Johnson were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Ross discusses his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, including capturing enemy soldiers, retrieving bodies of fallen Allied soldiers, and fighting in the trenches. He also talks about where he was during the signing of the armistice. He then talks about his civilian life and serving in the Oregon National Guard before the start of World War I, including being deployed to disrupt efforts by the International Workers of the World to unionize agricultural workers. He then revisits the topic of his service in the U.S. Army in France and Germany during World War I, and describes at length his experiences on the front lines. He closes the interview by discussing where to donate the oral history interview and related materials.

Ross, Kirby S. (Kirby Stewart), 1893-1984

Oral history interview with Gerry Pratt

  • SR 9
  • Collection
  • 1979-01-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Pratt was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the offices of the Fred Meyer Savings and Loan Association in Portland, Oregon, on January 29, 1979.

In this interview, Pratt tells stories about his family background and early life in Vancouver, Canada, including his education and his summer jobs. He talks about beginning his career in journalism at the Canadian Press, the Vancouver Sun, and the Toronto Telegram. He then discusses his career in journalism at the Oregonian newspaper and working as business editor. He speaks at length about his friendship with Fred G. Meyer. He describes his work as the president of Fred Meyer Savings and Loan, and the ways in which the banking field is changing. He also discusses his career as a television journalist. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Pratt, Gerry

The Immigrant Story Oral Histories

  • SR TIS
  • Collection
  • 2017 - 2020

The Immigrant Story is a private non-profit organization created by Sankar Raman in 2017 with the mission "to document, narrate, and curate the stories of immigrants in order to enhance empathy and help promote an inclusive community." Its goal is to both advance the national dialogue and to dispel myths about new Americans through strong, thoughtful narratives.

Raman, Sankar

Broadside of Western Defense Command instructions to all persons of Japanese ancestry

  • Coll 619
  • Collection
  • 1942-05

The collection consists of a broadside detailing the provisions of Civilian Exclusion Order No. 46 issued by General J. L. Dewitt on May 6, 1942. The order directs all persons of Japanese ancestry in Clackamas and eastern Multnomah counties to be evacuated to Civil Control Stations for forced incarceration during World War II.

United States. Army. Western Defense Command

Gerry Frank scrapbooks and memorabilia

  • Coll 855
  • Collection
  • Circa 1880-2018

Scrapbooks, photograph albums, photographs, papers, and ephemera compiled by or relating to Gerald W. "Gerry" Frank (1923-). Frank is a businessman from Oregon who worked at the department store Meier & Frank; opened a dessert shop in Salem, Oregon, named Gerry Frank's Konditerei; and was U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's chief of staff.

William L. Finley photographs, 1901-1940

  • Org. Lot 369
  • Collection
  • 1901 - 1940

Images of wildlife, primarily birds of the western United States, c.1900-1940s, photographed by William Lovell Finley and his associate Herman T. Bohlman, with the help of his wife, Nellie Irene Barnhart Finley and others. The collection includes fine images of adult and immature birds, chicks, eggs, and nests. Many show habitat. Others document the camera equipment and techniques used to make the photographs.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Portland General Electric Centennial Oral History Series

  • SR PGE
  • Collection
  • 1987 - 1988

A series of interviews conducted by Judy Hartman and Craig Wollner with employees of Portland General Electric for use in creating a history of the company for its centennial in 1988.

Hartman, Judy

Oral history interview with Constance Beaty

  • SR 4003
  • Collection
  • 1986-02-07 - 1986-02-07

This oral history interview with Constance Beaty was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, on February 7, 1986. In this interview, Beaty discusses her family background, her early life in Portland, and her childhood vacations in Seaview, Washington. She talks about the Golden West Hotel, which the first hotel in Portland to accommodate black people and was owned by her father, William Duncan Allen. She describes the interior furnishing of the hotel and talks about the clientele the hotel catered to. She discusses playing piano and organ; talks about her recreational and social activities as part of Portland's black community; and discusses her education in Portland. She closes the interview by talking about racial discrimination she experienced, and the impact her mother's death in 1924 had on her family.

Beaty, Constance (Nellie Constance), 1910-1996

Oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward

  • SR 2035
  • Collection
  • 1994-04-13 - 1994-05-04

This oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from April 13 to May 4, 1994. The interview was meant to act as a sequel to an earlier interview with Hayward that was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in 1979. The sequel interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 13, 1994, Hayward discusses his family background and early life in Holyoke, Massachusetts, including his education and his social life. He talks about his experience studying chemical engineering and electrical engineering at Columbia University, including his social life, his involvement in sports, and the advent of World War I. He discusses his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the war. He describes a back injury he sustained during training and the treatment he received after his discharge. He then talks about his career after the war, manufacturing time switches and later self-starting motors for clocks, known as Telechron motors. He also discusses his involvement with the American Legion and dealing with the Veterans Administration. He also talks about serving as chair for Minnesota congressman Walter Judd's campaign committee.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 4, 1994, Hayward discusses his association with Charles Lindbergh while Hayward was manufacturing clock self-starting motors. He also briefly revisits the topic of his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the World War I. He then talks about his brief marriage to Grace Parsons and his relationship with her son, Robert P. Hayward. He discusses his affiliation with the Congregational Church and his involvement with the American Legion. He closes the interview by taking about his participation in a parade in Vancouver, Washington.

Hayward, Charles L. (Charles Lewis), 1895-1998

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26 - 1989-04-26

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session.

In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

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