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Oral history interview with Doug G. Houser

  • SR 3700
  • Collection
  • 2021-07-26

This oral history interview with Doug G. Houser was conducted by Kerry Tymchuk on July 26, 2021, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. A transcript of the interview is available.

In this interview, Houser discusses his family background and early life in Oregon City, Oregon, particularly his relationship with his cousin, Phil Knight. He talks about his experience as a child with a speech impediment, about his early education, and about his decision to pursue a law career. He discusses his experience at Willamette University, including working as a page for the Oregon Legislature during his sophomore year, and having Mark Hatfield as an advisor. He then briefly talks about studying law at Stanford University. He speaks about his marriage to Lucy Anne Latham and describes their courtship. He also briefly talks about his service in the U.S. Army. He discusses his career with the Bullivant law firm in Portland. He describes cases he worked on, talks about lawyers he worked with, and discusses serving as a pro-tem judge for a summer in the 1960s. He speaks at length about his work as a lawyer, and later a board member, for Nike, Inc.

Houser, Doug G. (Douglas Guy), 1935-

Oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal was conducted by Sankar Raman on June 1, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Monica Salazar was also present.

In this interview, Jayapal discusses her family background and early life in India, Singapore, and in Jakarta, Indonesia, including her education. She talks about her reasons for going to the United States for college, and shares her experiences as an international student studying economics at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. She talks about working for Goldman Sachs in New York State after graduating, then shares her experiences studying law at the University of Chicago. She also discusses the availability of Indian cuisine in the U.S. She talks about practicing law in San Francisco, California, about her marriage to Bradley Stuart Miller, and about raising biracial children in Portland, Oregon. She then talks about working as a lawyer for Adidas, shares her reasons for quitting in 2000, and discusses her involvement in several non-profit organizations in Portland. She shares her reasons for running for the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners in 2017, talks about her campaign, and discusses the issues she plans to address while in office, including housing. She closes the interview by talking about communicating with her constituents, and about encouraging more Indian Americans to run for office.

Jayapal, Susheela, 1962-

Oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal

This oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal was conducted by Sankar Raman on June 1, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Monica Salazar was also present.

In this interview, Jayapal discusses her family background and early life in India, Singapore, and in Jakarta, Indonesia, including her education. She talks about her reasons for going to the United States for college, and shares her experiences as an international student studying economics at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. She talks about working for Goldman Sachs in New York State after graduating, then shares her experiences studying law at the University of Chicago. She also discusses the availability of Indian cuisine in the U.S. She talks about practicing law in San Francisco, California, about her marriage to Bradley Stuart Miller, and about raising biracial children in Portland, Oregon. She then talks about working as a lawyer for Adidas, shares her reasons for quitting in 2000, and discusses her involvement in several non-profit organizations in Portland. She shares her reasons for running for the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners in 2017, talks about her campaign, and discusses the issues she plans to address while in office, including housing. She closes the interview by talking about communicating with her constituents, and about encouraging more Indian Americans to run for office.

Jayapal, Susheela, 1962-

Oral history interview with Randall Dunn

This oral history interview with Randall Dunn was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski at the Bankruptcy Court building in Portland, Oregon, in seven sessions from September 18, 2018, to February 8, 2019. At the time of the interview, Wisnewski's name was Greta K. Smith.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 17, 2018, Dunn discusses his family background and early life in Crown Point, Indiana, including Indiana politics and his education, particularly the experience of taking high school classes from his mother. He also talks about playing clarinet and his interest in music. He then discusses his experience at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, including the house he lived in, his roommates, and continuing to play music.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 22, 2018, Dunn continues discussing his family background and his experience at Northwestern University, including working in an oil refinery during the summers. He then talks about his experience at Stanford Law School, including his impressions of the West Coast, some of his professors, and working on the law review. He also talks about his later work as editor-in-chief of the Oregon Debtor-Creditor Newsletter. He discusses playing clarinet in the Stanford orchestra, where he met his wife, Laurie.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Dunn continues discussing his experience at Stanford Law School, including working as a law clerk in Indiana during the summers. He also continues discussing his relationship with, and later marriage to, Laurie. He then talks about practicing antitrust law at Berman and Giauque in Salt Lake City, Utah, and then bankruptcy law at Copeland, Landye, Bennet, and Wolf in Portland, Oregon. He describes the workplace culture in both places and some of the cases he worked on. He talks about playing clarinet in the Salem Symphony and the Portland Opera orchestra.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on December 28, 2018, Dunn continues to discuss practicing bankruptcy law at Copeland, Landye, Bennet, and Wolf in Portland, and describes some of the cases he worked on. He then talks about Oregon bankruptcy law, the procedures of the Oregon bankruptcy court, and the bankruptcy court staff, including judges and law clerks. He also discusses working as editor of the Oregon Debtor-Creditor Newsletter and other bankruptcy court-related publications. He further discusses playing clarinet in the Portland Opera orchestra.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on January 11, 2019, Dunn discusses the lawyer job market in Portland. He then continues talking about bankruptcy law, particularly the changes to the law made in 2005. He talks about his service as a bankruptcy judge beginning in 1998, including the application process, his fellow judges, and learning how to be a judge. He also talks about decorating his office at the bankruptcy courthouse in Portland, about his law clerks, and about scheduling cases.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on January 25, 2019, Dunn continues discussing his service as a bankruptcy judge beginning in 1998, including some of the cases he heard and his judicial philosophy. He also talks about his service on the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel beginning in 2006, including his fellow panelists and some of the cases he heard.

In the seventh and final interiew session, conducted on February 8, 2019, Dunn continues discussing his service on the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel beginning in 2006, including some of the cases he heard. He also talks about his involvement with the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges and awards he received. He discusses the importance of bankruptcy laws, reflects on his accomplishments, and talks about his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing the science program for the Ninth Circuit Executive Committee.

Dunn, Randall L. (Randall Lawson), 1950-

Oral history interview with Randall Dunn [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Randall Dunn was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski at the Bankruptcy Court building in Portland, Oregon, in seven sessions from September 18, 2018, to February 8, 2019. At the time of the interview, Wisnewski's name was Greta K. Smith.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 17, 2018, Dunn discusses his family background and early life in Crown Point, Indiana, including Indiana politics and his education, particularly the experience of taking high school classes from his mother. He also talks about playing clarinet and his interest in music. He then discusses his experience at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, including the house he lived in, his roommates, and continuing to play music.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 22, 2018, Dunn continues discussing his family background and his experience at Northwestern University, including working in an oil refinery during the summers. He then talks about his experience at Stanford Law School, including his impressions of the West Coast, some of his professors, and working on the law review. He also talks about his later work as editor-in-chief of the Oregon Debtor-Creditor Newsletter. He discusses playing clarinet in the Stanford orchestra, where he met his wife, Laurie.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Dunn continues discussing his experience at Stanford Law School, including working as a law clerk in Indiana during the summers. He also continues discussing his relationship with, and later marriage to, Laurie. He then talks about practicing antitrust law at Berman and Giauque in Salt Lake City, Utah, and then bankruptcy law at Copeland, Landye, Bennet, and Wolf in Portland, Oregon. He describes the workplace culture in both places and some of the cases he worked on. He talks about playing clarinet in the Salem Symphony and the Portland Opera orchestra.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on December 28, 2018, Dunn continues to discuss practicing bankruptcy law at Copeland, Landye, Bennet, and Wolf in Portland, and describes some of the cases he worked on. He then talks about Oregon bankruptcy law, the procedures of the Oregon bankruptcy court, and the bankruptcy court staff, including judges and law clerks. He also discusses working as editor of the Oregon Debtor-Creditor Newsletter and other bankruptcy court-related publications. He further discusses playing clarinet in the Portland Opera orchestra.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on January 11, 2019, Dunn discusses the lawyer job market in Portland. He then continues talking about bankruptcy law, particularly the changes to the law made in 2005. He talks about his service as a bankruptcy judge beginning in 1998, including the application process, his fellow judges, and learning how to be a judge. He also talks about decorating his office at the bankruptcy courthouse in Portland, about his law clerks, and about scheduling cases.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on January 25, 2019, Dunn continues discussing his service as a bankruptcy judge beginning in 1998, including some of the cases he heard and his judicial philosophy. He also talks about his service on the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel beginning in 2006, including his fellow panelists and some of the cases he heard.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on February 8, 2019, Dunn continues discussing his service on the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel beginning in 2006, including some of the cases he heard. He also talks about his involvement with the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges and awards he received. He discusses the importance of bankruptcy laws, reflects on his accomplishments, and talks about his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing the science program for the Ninth Circuit Executive Committee.

Dunn, Randall L. (Randall Lawson), 1950-

Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II. He discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health, as well as his high school experience in Eugene. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life, his summer activities, and his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon law school, including the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker. He speaks at length about the practice of law, as well as some of the cases he tried, some of his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

Peterson discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about his appointment by Governor Vic Atiyeh. He describes his fellow judges on the Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also shows Dobbins his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University law school and working as a mediator.

Peterson, Edwin J. (Edwin Junior), 1930-

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman [Transcript]

Transcript. This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman’s office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman

This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman's office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London in England; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde

This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones' name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Fedde's wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present during the interview and often contributed to Canty-Jones' questioning. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.

In the interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hague, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with John L. Schwabe

This oral history interview with John L. Schwabe was conducted by Gregory J. Miner from July 25 to September 15, 2006. The audio is incomplete; Tape 1 has been missing since 2015.

In this interview, Schwabe discusses some of the cases he worked on as a lawyer in Portland, Oregon; his involvement in various Portland civic organizations; and other Portland lawyers. He also talks about the buildings in which his law firm, Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt, was located; his love of fishing; and his children, their careers, and their families.

Schwabe discusses his early law career in Silverton, Oregon, and how he relocated to practice law in Portland in 1952. He talks about working as a trial lawyer, working on condemnation cases, and his involvement in urban renewal efforts in Portland. He talks about work he did in Nevada and Georgia, as well as his longtime friendship with President Jimmy Carter, whom he met when Carter was a Georgia state senator. He talks about lawyers he worked with, including Wendell Wyatt, and their subsequent careers. He closes the interview by talking about his favorite fishing spot.

Schwabe, John L. (John Leonard), 1919-2011

Oral history interview with Velma J. Jeremiah

This oral history interview with Velma J. Jeremiah was conducted by Youlee Yim You from February 19 to 26, 1994, and in 2006. In this interview, Jeremiah discusses her family background and early life in Eugene and Oregon City, Oregon, including her education and her memories of the Depression. She then talks about studying architecture at the University of Oregon from 1939 to 1940, and again briefly in 1941, as well as her dire financial situation. She describes her memories of World War II, including working at army camps in California, and rationing. She also talks about her marriage to Neil Jeremiah and living in Seattle, Washington, while he served in the Navy during World War II; starting an ill-fated business in San Francisco, California; and returning to Seattle after the war. She discusses Neil's teaching career, her own jobs, and their divorce in 1963.

Jeremiah discusses her decision to go to law school at the Northwestern College of Law in Portland. She then describes practicing law at Davies, Biggs, Strayer, Stoel & Boley, the firm now known as Stoel Rives, from 1975 to 1986, including some of the cases she tried, other women attorneys, and her retirement. She also discusses her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, the Multnomah Bar Association, and the Queen's Bench. She briefly talks about some of the discrimination women faced in the law profession. She talks about her activities during her retirement, including travel, involvement with Mensa, and stand-up comedy. She also talks about jury duty; her son and his family; and playing piano.

In the second part of this interview, conducted on June 30, 2006, Jeremiah revisits some of the topics discussed earlier in 1994. She talks about taking the bar exam in 1968; professors at Northwestern College of Law; and the difficulties she faced trying to find a job as a woman lawyer. She then talks about working at Stoel Rives. She relates a few anecdotes about how women clients were sometimes treated by her male colleagues. She describes a typical workday at the law firm; early dress codes for women; and the partners of the firm. She talks about the support women lawyers in the firm gave to each other. She also discusses organizations she's been involved in, including NARAL, Planned Parenthood, and Mensa. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with her condominium association.

Jeremiah, Velma J. (Velma Julia), 1921-2017

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006 as part of the United States District Court Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in two sessions, and a transcript is available.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 5, 2005, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 4, 2006, Tanzer continues to discuss serving on the Oregon Supreme Court. He speaks further about serving on the bench with Hans Linde, and talks about some of the opinions he wrote. He discusses how the procedures of the court changed during his tenure, the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government, and his return to private legal practice in 1983. He closes the interview by sharing advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer

This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006 as part of the United States District Court Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in two sessions, and a transcript is available.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 5, 2005, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 4, 2006, Tanzer continues to discuss serving on the Oregon Supreme Court. He speaks further about serving on the bench with Hans Linde, and talks about some of the opinions he wrote. He discusses how the procedures of the court changed during his tenure, the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government, and his return to private legal practice in 1983. He closes the interview by sharing advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty

This oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty was conducted by Clark Hansen in Haggerty's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, in four sessions from December 9, 2005, to February 23, 2006. Interview sessions in December 2005, part of a session in January 2006, and the session in February 2006 were recorded on audiocassette. The other part of the session in January 2006 was recorded on videocassette.

In the December 2005 and January 2006 sessions recorded on audiocassette, Haggerty discusses his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, including his involvement in high school football. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, his views on the Vietnam War, and joining the Marine Corps. He discusses his military training, being wounded in Vietnam in 1968, and his rehabilitation. He also discusses some of the politics contemporary to the interview session in 2005. He talks about attending the U.C. Hastings College of the Law and taking the Oregon bar exam in 1973.

Haggerty speaks about his legal career, beginning with a brief discussion of his work as a public defender for the Metropolitan Public Defender in Portland from 1973 to 1977. He then talks about working as a lawyer with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt from 1977 to 1989. He discusses his marriage to Judith Ann Blair in 1983, and their children. He talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1990 to 1993, including his appointment by Governor Neil Goldschmidt, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election campaign. He then talks about serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1993 to the time of the interview in 2006. He talks about his nomination by President Bill Clinton.

In the January 2006 video recording, Haggerty revisits the topic of his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, his interest in playing football, and his service in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. He then speaks in more detail about his college experience at U.C. Hastings College of the Law; his work as a public defender in Portland; and practicing law at Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt. He also talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and describes his experience as a judge on the Tom Metzger case, as well as other cases he heard. He then discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including his fellow judges, writing opinions, and serving as chief judge. He closes the video session by discussing his judicial philosophy.

In the final, audio-only interview session in February 2006, Haggerty discusses his early years as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, his relationship with his fellow District Court judges and other court employees, and the role of the court. He talks about some of the cases he heard, his staff, and serving as chief judge from 2002 until the time of the interview in 2006. He also discusses writing opinions, funding for the courts, and the make-up of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2006. He talks about the public opinion of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, jury trials, and sentencing. He talks about national politics between 2000 and 2006. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments.

Haggerty, Ancer Lee, 1944-

Oral history interview with George D. Rives

This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives' home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and at Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm's 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with Don H. Marmaduke

This oral history interview with Don H. Marmaduke was conducted by Brian G. Booth in the offices of the Tonkon Torp law firm in Portland, Oregon, on December 6, 2002. In this interview, Marmaduke discusses his family background and early life in Portland. He talks about his college experiences at Yale University and Harvard Law School in the 1940s, and describes his social life, as well as some of his professors and fellow students. He talks about his marriage to Mary Ellen Dandy and about working as a law clerk in Boston, Massachusetts. He discusses his 1952 move back to Portland, and practicing law with the firm now known as Stoel Rives. He discusses some of the lawyers he worked with, clients he represented, and some of his pro bono work, including in Mississippi as a civil rights lawyer in the 1960s. He discusses leaving Stoel Rives in 1971 to form his own law firm, and joining Tonkon Torp in 1974. He talks about cases he handled, including cases regarding antitrust and intellectual property law. He closes the interview by talking about awards he's won and his plans for the future.

Marmaduke, Don H. (Don Hall), 1926-2019

Oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Robinson's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 12 to March 10, 2004. In this interview, Robsinson discusses his family background and early life in Georgia; he describes life as a black person in the segregated South, his early education, and growing up on a farm. He talks about attending Southwestern Christian College in Texas, and moving to Portland, Oregon, after graduation. He describes working for National Biscuit Company (now known as Nabisco Inc.), racism he faced in Oregon, and his marriage to and later divorce from Beverlee Foreman. He then talks about giving up plans to become a minister and instead attending Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College. He also talks about taking the Oregon Bar exam.Robinson discusses starting his private law practice in Portland. He talks about arguing cases before Judge Gus Solomon and some of the cases he handled. He then discusses working as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about cases he prosecuted (and a few he chose not to prosecute), and arguing against public defenders. He also discusses systemic racism in the criminal justice system. He discusses serving on the Oregon Parole Board, including some of the decisions he made. He discusses serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court, including his appointment in 1990. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, as well as numerous other organizations. He discusses cases he heard on the Circuit Court, judicial procedure, and programs to reduce recidivism. He discusses his involvement with the community court program and the drug diversion court program. He closes the interview by talking about his children, their families, and their careers; his health; and the Roosevelt Robinson scholarship fund.

Robinson, Roosevelt, 1941-2004

Oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson

This oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Robinson's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 12 to March 10, 2004. In this interview, Robsinson discusses his family background and early life in Georgia; he describes life as a black person in the segregated South, his early education, and growing up on a farm. He talks about attending Southwestern Christian College in Texas, and moving to Portland, Oregon, after graduation. He describes working for the National Biscuit Company (now known as Nabisco Inc.), racism he faced in Oregon, and his marriage to and later divorce from Beverlee Foreman. He then talks about giving up plans to become a minister and instead attending Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College. He also talks about taking the Oregon Bar exam.

Robinson discusses starting his private law practice in Portland. He talks about arguing cases before Judge Gus Solomon and some of the cases he handled. He then discusses working as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about cases he prosecuted (and a few he chose not to prosecute), and arguing against public defenders. He also discusses systemic racism in the criminal justice system. He discusses serving on the Oregon Parole Board, including some of the decisions he made. He discusses serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court, including his appointment in 1990. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, as well as numerous other organizations. He discusses cases he heard on the Circuit Court, judicial procedure, and programs to reduce recidivism. He discusses his involvement with the community court program and the drug diversion court program. He closes the interview by talking about his children, their families, and their careers; his health; and the Roosevelt Robinson scholarship fund.

Robinson, Roosevelt, 1941-2004

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph

This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Joseph's home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph's entire life and career.

Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family's own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans and other events during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and his subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr's family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney's office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney's office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney's office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark's accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O’Rourke at Joseph’s home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph’s entire life and career. Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family’s own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans, and other events, during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr’s family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney’s office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney’s office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney’s office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark’s accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold

This oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from September 19-26, 2001. In this interview, Herbold discusses her family background and early life, including moving around often due to her father's Navy career. She speaks briefly about attending the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon Law School, and about the sexism women college students faced. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, including her experience as the first woman trial attorney at the Dusendorf, Spears, Lubersky law firm. She describes starting a law firm with Dave Markowitz, the lawyers she hired, and cases she handled.

Herbold, Barrie J. (Barrie Jane), 1949-2001

Oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from September 19-26, 2001. In this interview, Herbold discusses her family background and early life, including moving around often due to her father’s Navy career. She speaks briefly about attending the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon Law School, and about the sexism women college students faced. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, including her experience as the first woman trial attorney at the Dusendorf, Spears, Lubersky law firm. She describes starting a law firm with Dave Markowitz, the lawyers she hired, and cases she handled.

Herbold, Barrie J. (Barrie Jane), 1949-2001

Oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil

This oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil was conducted by Patricia Wlodarczyk from November 3, 2000, to May 9, 2001. At O'Neil's request, sections of sessions 2 and 3 of the interview were redacted by the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Historical Society. In addition to the audio recording and transcript of the interview, the collection includes a digital photograph album in PDF format containing images of O'Neil's family, friends, and colleagues. All but two of the digital photographs used to create the album are also included in the collection as individual images.

In this interview, O'Neil discusses her family background and early life in New Orleans, Louisiana, including her early education, family vacations, and race relations in the South. She talks about studying political science at Stanford University, including her social life and her year studying abroad at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. She then briefly discusses her involvement with the Republican Party and working for the Young Republicans in Washington, D.C. She talks about studying law at Harvard University, including her experience as a female student, as well as meeting Mike O'Neil and their subsequent marriage. She talks about raising a family; relocating to Tigard, Oregon, in 1964; and working as a correspondent for the Community Press and the Oregonian newspaper. She discusses studying law at Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, including her fellow law students.

O'Neil discusses practicing law in Portland. She talks about her first job with a law firm and sexist attitudes she faced as a woman lawyer, as well as racist attitudes she observed in her fellow lawyers. She talks about her fellow lawyers, judges she argued before, and some of the cases she worked on, particularly regarding admiralty law. She describes each of the law firms she worked for during her career. She also talks about trips to China in 1983 and 1985; her involvement in the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers; and serving as a pro-tem judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court. She discusses her plans for retirement; her children and their careers and their families; and serving on the American Bar Association House of Delegates. She also speaks about her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. She talks about changes in the law profession and her role in the investigation of U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. O'Neil closes the interview by discussing people who influenced her to pursue a career as a lawyer.

O'Neil, Katherine Huff, 1938-

Oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Katherine Huff O’Neil was conducted by Patricia Wlodarczyk from November 3, 2000, to May 9, 2001. At O'Neil's request sections of sessions 2 and 3 of the interview were redacted by the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Historical Society. In addition to the interview, the collection includes a digital photograph album in PDF format containing photographs of O’Neil’s family, friends, and colleagues. All but two of the digital photographs used to create the album are also included in JPEG format.

In this interview, O’Neil discusses her family background and early life in New Orleans, Louisiana, including her early education, family vacations, and race relations in the South. She talks about studying political science at Stanford University, including her social life and her year studying abroad at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. She then briefly discusses her involvement with the Republican Party and working for the Young Republicans in Washington, D.C. She talks about studying law at Harvard University, including her experience as a female student, as well as meeting Mike O’Neil and their subsequent marriage. She talks about raising a family; relocating to Tigard, Oregon, in 1964; and working as a correspondent for the Community Press and the Oregonian newspaper. She discusses studying law at Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, including her fellow law students.

O’Neil discusses practicing law in Portland. She talks about her first job with a law firm and sexist attitudes she faced as a woman lawyer, as well as racist attitudes she observed in her fellow lawyers. She talks about her fellow lawyers, judges she argued before, and some of the cases she worked on, particularly regarding admiralty law. She describes each of the law firms she worked for during her career. She also talks about trips to China in 1983 and 1985; her involvement in the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers; and serving as a pro-tem judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court. She discusses her plans for retirement; her children and their careers and their families; and serving on the American Bar Association House of Delegates. She also speaks about her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. She talks about changes in the law profession and her role in the investigation of U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. O’Neil closes the interview by discussing people who influenced her to pursue a career as a lawyer.

O'Neil, Katherine Huff, 1938-

Oral history interview with Holly Hart

This oral history interview with Holly Hart was conducted by Winter Drews and James Loos at Hart's home in Portland, Oregon, on November 14, 2000. Drews and Loos conducted the interview for the Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest as part of Professor Ann Mussey's senior capstone class on LGBTQ history at Portland State University. The interview transcript includes a written introduction by George Nicola.

In this interview, Hart discusses her experience at Reed College in Portland during the 1960s, including her experience as a closeted lesbian and her political and civil rights activism. She talks about working for the Willamette Bridge newspaper, her involvement in the gay liberation movement, and coming out as a lesbian. She briefly talks about her experience studying law at the University of California at Berkeley, then discusses practicing law in Portland. She talks about cases she worked on, lawyers she worked with, and her focus on civil rights cases, particularly gay rights. She discusses serving on the Task Force on Sexual Preference and describes the report of recommendations she authored for the governor. She talks about her dissatisfaction with practicing law and her decision to instead open a restaurant, Old Wives' Tales; describes the process of opening the restaurant; and talks about her original plan to also open a bookstore. She speaks at length about running the restaurant and its role in the Portland community. She then discusses having a child via artificial insemination and talks about raising her daughter. She also discusses her involvement in Portland's Jewish community. She then revisits the topic of her restaurant and talks about the diversity of its clientele; discusses how social conditions for LGBTQ people have changed in Portland; and talks about her experience as a lesbian and a mother in Portland's Jewish community. She closes the interview by revisiting the topic of her work at the Willamette Bridge newspaper, describing instances of harassment she has experienced, and talking about her hopes for the future of gay rights.

Hart, Holly, 1947-

Oral history interview with Thomas Cooney [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Thomas Cooney was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from October 17 to November 2, 2000. In this interview, Cooney discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his interest in drama and golf, and his memories of World War II. He then discusses attending the University of Portland, including being a cheerleader. He also briefly discusses his service in the Air Force during the Korean War. He relates several unfortunate incidents involving a pogo stick. He describes studying law at Willamette University, including his social life. He then talks about raising a family and coaching his son’s basketball team. He describes getting started in law practice in Portland, Oregon, at MacGuire, Shields, Morrison, and Bailey, including several of the cases he tried. He then speaks at length about representing the Oregon Medical Association while a partner at Cooney & Crew and several of the malpractice suits he tried. He also relates several anecdotes about his life and being a lawyer.

Cooney, Thomas E., 1931-2015

Oral history interview with Thomas Cooney

This oral history interview with Thomas Cooney was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from October 17 to November 2, 2000. In this interview, Cooney discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his interest in drama and golf, and his memories of World War II. He then discusses attending the University of Portland, including being a cheerleader. He also briefly discusses his service in the Air Force during the Korean War. He relates several unfortunate incidents involving a pogo stick. He describes studying law at Willamette University, including his social life. He then talks about raising a family and coaching his son's basketball team. He describes getting started in law practice in Portland, Oregon, at MacGuire, Shields, Morrison, and Bailey, including several of the cases he tried. He then speaks at length about representing the Oregon Medical Association while a partner at Cooney & Crew and several of the malpractice suits he tried. He also relates several anecdotes about his life and being a lawyer.

Cooney, Thomas E., 1931-2015

Oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus

This oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus was conducted by Mary Ellen Page Farr in Ashland, Oregon, from March 13, 1999, to February 19, 2000. In this interview, Althaus discusses her family background, particularly her family's history of civil rights activism, and her early life on a farm in Troutdale, Oregon, including her education, her interest in science, and her social life. She discusses her experiences as law clerk for Judge James Alger Fee, from 1947 to 1949. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, with the law firm King Miller, now known as Miller Nash, from 1953 to 1970, including some of the cases she argued and other women lawyers she worked with. She closes the interview by briefly discussing her work as deputy city attorney for Portland from 1949 to 1953.

Althaus, Helen F.

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