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Oral history interview with Jerry F. Cundari

  • SR 1164
  • Collection
  • 2023-08-23

This oral history interview with Jerry F. Cundari was conducted by Kerry Tymchuk in Portland, Oregon, on August 23, 2023. A transcript of the interview is available.

In this interview, Cundari discusses his early career as a golf caddy at the Portland Golf Club and describes his experiences playing in golf tournaments as a teenager. He speaks about golf players he competed against, and about titles he won. He talks about his college experience at the University of Oregon, particularly playing golf for the university team. He discusses continuing to play golf while working for the family insurance company, Cundari Insurance, and while raising a family, and shares his reasons for never pursuing a career as a professional golfer. He talks about professional golfers he played with, including Arnold Palmer, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus. He closes the interview by talking about tournaments he played in as a senior golfer.

Cundari, Jerry F. (Gerald Francis), 1940-

Northwest Women's History Project records and interviews

  • Coll 883
  • Collection
  • 1943-2021

This collection consists of the records of Northwest Women's History Project and audio recordings of oral history interviews the organization conducted with women who had worked in shipyards in Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, during World War II.

Digitized materials available online in OHS Digital Collections consist of the interview audio recordings and, when available, completed interview transcripts. The interviews explore issues such as sexual harassment, sexism and racism in unions and on the job, child care, on-the-job training, and life after the war.

Undigitized materials available for use at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library consist of the Northwest Women's History Project records in the collection. The bulk of these records relate to the interviews with women shipyard workers and a resulting presentation, titled "Good Work, Sister!" The records include grant documents, telephone questionnaires, transcripts and excerpts of in-person interviews, photographic slides of interviewees who were featured in "Good Work, Sister!" and photographs and records relating to "Good Work, Sister!" events. Also included are some photographs, clippings, ephemera, and memorabilia relating to women shipyard workers in World War II. Other undigitized materials include administrative records, materials relating to the organization's later projects, and materials about the re-release of "Good Work, Sister!" on DVD.

Northwest Women's History Project

Oregon Historical Society Nominated Oral Histories

  • SR Oregon Historical Society Nominated Oral Histories
  • Collection
  • 2017-2021

A series of oral history interviews with Oregonians. The subjects were selected from a pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the OHS Executive Director. The purpose of these interviews was to create historical documents of enduring value to enhance and expand the range of Oregon voices preserved by the OHS Research Library, complement existing collections and programs of the Oregon Historical Society, and address goals for collection development and community engagement. The program ended in 2020.

Oregon Historical Society

Oral history interview with Dorothy J. and Hurtis M. Hadley, Sr.

  • SR 1406
  • Collection
  • 2021-11-19

This oral history interview with Dorothy J. Hadley and Hurtis M. Hadley, Sr., was conducted by Sarah Harris via Zoom videoconferencing software on November 19, 2021. The interview was conducted as part of Harris' graduate thesis project at Portland State University, in collaboration with the Hadleys, the Oregon Historical Society, and the Milwaukie Museum. A transcript of the interview is available.

In this interview, the Hadleys discuss how they first met. Hurtis M. Hadley, Sr., talks about his career and training as a bakery manager, and shares his experience of being denied a promotion because he is Black. The Hadleys talk about purchasing the Milwaukie Pastry Kitchen in 1977, about operating the business, and about their reasons for closing in 1985. They talk about raising a family while running the bakery, including the work their children did in the bakery, and about going on vacations. Dorothy J. Hadley discusses their children's education and their experience with being bused to a school in Northeast Portland, and talks about encountering racial discrimination in the school system. The Hadleys talk about the bakery's customers. Dorothy J. Hadley discusses her recent work creating and decorating mock cakes out of towels for weddings and baby showers. She also discusses their cookbook, "Stories to Laugh About"; and the origins of her nickname, Honi. The Hadleys talk about their favorite desserts sold in the bakery, and they close the interview by discussing their efforts to have the site of the bakery marked with a historical plaque.

Hadley, Dorothy Jean, 1942-

Oral history interview with Doug G. Houser

  • SR 3700
  • Collection
  • 2021-07-26

This oral history interview with Doug G. Houser was conducted by Kerry Tymchuk on July 26, 2021, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. A transcript of the interview is available.

In this interview, Houser discusses his family background and early life in Oregon City, Oregon, particularly his relationship with his cousin, Phil Knight. He talks about his experience as a child with a speech impediment, about his early education, and about his decision to pursue a law career. He discusses his experience at Willamette University, including working as a page for the Oregon Legislature during his sophomore year, and having Mark Hatfield as an advisor. He then briefly talks about studying law at Stanford University. He speaks about his marriage to Lucy Anne Latham and describes their courtship. He also briefly talks about his service in the U.S. Army. He discusses his career with the Bullivant law firm in Portland. He describes cases he worked on, talks about lawyers he worked with, and discusses serving as a pro-tem judge for a summer in the 1960s. He speaks at length about his work as a lawyer, and later a board member, for Nike, Inc.

Houser, Doug G. (Douglas Guy), 1935-

Oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge was conducted in thirty sessions by Stephanie Vallance from February 7, 2020, to April 23, 2021. TThe interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Labor Oral History Program, which collects oral histories of individuals who have advocated for working people of Oregon, including public figures, union members, and workers. Sessions one through four were conducted at Partridge’s home in Portland, Oregon. The remaining sessions were conducted using Zoom video conferencing software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 7, 2020, Partridge discusses his family background and early life in California, Washington state, and in Lake Oswego, Oregon. He discusses the evolution of his political beliefs, particularly regarding racial justice and labor unions, and talks about some of the people who influenced him. He describes hitchhiking to San Francisco, California, during the 1967 “Summer of Love.”

In the second interview session, conducted on February 21, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his early life, including his education and jobs he worked. He speaks about his experiences in San Francisco during the 1967 “Summer of Love.” He describes his involvement in political, labor, and civil rights movements in the late 1960s while a student at Dartmouth College, including his experiences as a protestor at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He also talks about becoming aware of class struggles and of his white privilege.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 28, 2020, Partridge shares his reason for dropping out of college in 1968, then talks about his work with the Brooklyn Action Center. He also describes his relationship with Tom Potter. He speaks about living in various collectives and communes during the 1970s, about seeking conscientious objector status during the Vietnam War, and about his involvement with the Black Panthers and the Community Control of Police initiative.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 6, 2020, Partridge discusses his relationship with the Portland Police Bureau, including his friendships with individual officers, witnessing police interactions with Black people, and his involvement with protests against police brutality. He shares his experiences as a victim of sexual assault, and talks about his identity as a bisexual man.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on July 11, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Black Panthers, talks about his work with feminist organizations, and shares his experiences teaching classes at an experimental high school. He also talks about living in collectives and communes in Portland, about various jobs he held, and about his experiences in San Francisco during the summer of 1976.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on July 18, 2020, Partridge discusses the evolution of his political views during the 1970s and joining the Freedom Socialist Party. He describes a co-parenting arrangement he entered with a former student. He talks about more jobs that he held and his early involvement with labor unions.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on July 25, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Freedom Socialist Party, and the co-parenting arrangement he entered with a former student. He talks about his involvement with the Central American Solidarity Committee in the 1980s, including traveling to Mexico and Nicaragua.

In the eighth interview session, conducted on August 1, 2020, Partridge discusses organizing postal workers to resist an attempt by the administration of President Donald J. Trump to dismantle the U.S. Postal Service at the time of the interview in 2020. He revisits the topic of his involvement with the Central American Solidarity Committee in the 1980s, talks about the connection between the labor movement and revolutionary politics in Central America, and discusses Canadian postal unions. He talks about his career as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service in Portland from 1984 to 2011. He also discusses campaigning for Jesse Jackson in the 1980s.

In the ninth interview session, conducted on August 29, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition, and continues to talk about campaigning for Jesse Jackson in the 1980s. He discusses his involvement in political campaigns for labor-friendly politicians in Oregon, as well as campaigns for issues such as minimum wage increases and the renaming of Portland streets. He also talks about his work as a contributor to various publications.

In the tenth interview session, conducted on September 19, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and reads from their newsletter. He talks about his involvement with Jobs with Justice, and about the political activism of his parents.

In the eleventh interview session , conducted on October 3, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and reads from their newsletter. He continues to talk about his involvement with Jobs with Justice, discusses the history of the Teamsters Union, and talks about the inclusion of agricultural workers in the labor movement. He talks about Jesse Jackson’s 1992 visit to Portland, and about the activities of the Portland Teacher’s Union in the 1990s.

In the twelfth interview session, conducted on October 16, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement in election integrity efforts for the 2020 presidential election. He then continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and to read from their newsletter. He talks about the Workers Rights Hearing Board, and shares his thoughts about police interactions with protestors in Portland.

In the thirteenth interview session, conducted on October 23, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and read from their newsletter. He discusses his involvement in political campaigns, including acting as campaign manager for Geri Washington, as well lobbying on issues such as single payer health care and an increased minimum wage. He also talks about his relationship with U.S. Senator Ron Wyden.

In the fourteenth interview session, conducted on October 30, 2020, Partridge Partridge reflects on his lifetime of involvement in politics and protest movements. He discusses the transition of the Rainbow Coalition into the New Party, and talks about his involvement with the organization. He talks about the history of trade globalization and the 1999 World Trade Organization (WT) protests in Seattle, Washington.

In the fifteenth interview session, conducted on November 13, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the New Party and read from their newsletter. He talks about gentrification in North and Northeast Portland, about recovering from a drug addiction, and about his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service.

In the sixteenth interview session, conducted on November 27, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, including working conditions and unions for postal workers.

In the seventeenth interview session, conducted on December 4, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter, which was published by the National Association of Letter Carriers Branch 82. He talks about working conditions and about women postal workers. He discusses his involvement in the postal workers’ union and talks about his political activism with the union.

In the eighteenth interview session, conducted on December 18, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter. He also talks about his retirement in 2011 and his continued involvement with the union.

In the nineteenth interview session, conducted on January 15, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter. He continues to talk about his involvement with the postal workers union.

In the twentieth interview session, conducted on January 22, 2021, Partridge discusses the history and activities of Jobs with Justice, including the annual Bad Boss award and efforts to increase the minimum wage. He also talks about the relationship between police and labor.

In the twenty-first interview session, conducted on January 29, 2021, Partridge discusses his involvement with Jobs with Justice and the Workers Rights Board. He talks about the activities of those organizations, including efforts to organize workers at Powell’s Books.

In the twenty-second interview session, conducted on February 5, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with Jobs with Justice and talk about its activities, including supporting unionization efforts. He also talks about the 2006 Great American Boycott.

In the twenty-third interview session, conducted on February 19, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss the 2006 Great American Boycott. He also talks about efforts to unionize workers at Providence Hospital and about his show on the Portland radio station KBOO.

In the twenty-fourth interview session, conducted on February 27, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his show on the Portland radio station KBOO. He talks about the activities of Jobs with Justice, about federal labor legislation, and about the history of Portland’s day labor center. He speaks about the Occupy movement.

In the twenty-fifth interview session, conducted on March 5, 2021, Partridge revisits the topic of the Workers Rights Board, focusing on its work on behalf of postal workers. He discusses his involvement in the postal workers union after his retirement, particularly protesting the Postal Service retirement prefunding mandate.

In the twenty-sixth interview session, conducted on March 19, 2021, Partridge discusses his relationship with LaVern Simmons, including their involvement with the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church. He talks about Simmons’ early life and her children.

In the twenty-seventh interview session, conducted on March 26, 2021, Partridge revisits the topic of his involvement in the postal workers union after his retirement, particularly regarding resistance against the policies of Postmaster General Louis DeJoy.

In the twenty-eighth interview session, conducted on April 9, 2021, Partridge reviews his life of political activism, describing his involvement in movements not previously discussed in the interview, including Portland Tenants United and Don’t Shoot PDX. He also revisits the topics of his relationship with police officers and the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Portland.

In the twenty-ninth interview session, conducted on April 16, 2021, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Democratic Socialists of America. He also talks about the postal workers union.

In the thirtieth and final interview session, conducted on April 23, 2021, Partridge closes the interview by reflecting on the oral history interview experience, and by talking about his hopes for the future.

Partridge, Jamie G. (James Gilbert), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge

This oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge was conducted by Stephanie Vallance in thirty sessions from February 7, 2020, to April 23, 2021. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Labor Oral History Program, which collects oral histories of individuals who have advocated for working people of Oregon, including public figures, union members, and workers. Sessions 1 through 4 were conducted at Partridge's home in Portland, Oregon. The remaining sessions were conducted using Zoom video conferencing software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In sessions 1 through 5, Partridge discusses his early life and the development of his political beliefs during the 1960s and 1970s, including his experiences during the 1967 "Summer of Love" in San Francisco, California, his involvement with the Black Panthers, and his friendship with Portland police officer Tom Potter.

In sessions 6 through 8, Partridge discusses his involvement in the Freedom Socialist Party, the co-parenting arrangement he entered with a former student, and his involvement with the Central American Solidarity Committee in the 1980s. He also begins to discuss campaigning for Jesse Jackson.

In sessions 9 through 15, Partridge discusses his involvement in the Rainbow Coalition, campaigning for Jesse Jackson, and his involvement in Jobs with Justice. He also talks about his career as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service.

In sessions 16 though 19, Partridge discusses his career as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and his involvement with the postal workers union.

In sessions 20 through 24, Partridge discusses his involvement in Jobs with Justice. He talks about the 2006 Great American Boycott, and about his radio show on the Portland station KBOO.

In sessions 25 through 30, Partridge talks about his involvement in the postal workers union after his retirement in 2011, discusses his involvement with the Democratic Socialists of America, and reflects on the oral history experience.

Partridge, Jamie G. (James Gilbert), 1949-

Interview with Brian R. Gant about Clive Charles and soccer in Portland, Oregon

  • SR 1398
  • Collection
  • 2021-02-10

This interview with Brian R. Gant was conducted by Katelyn Best on February 10, 2021, as research for "The House that Clive Built," an article by Best that was published in the Rose City Review on February 26, 2021. The interview was conducted over the phone and recorded using Audacity audio recording software.

In this interview, Gant discusses playing soccer with the Portland Timbers in the mid-1970s. He describes how the team changed after 1978. He talks about playing on the team with Clive Charles, about the camaraderie of the team, and about the team's involvement in the Portland community. He discusses F.C. Portland, a soccer club that also coached kids in the summers and was begun by Clive Charles in 1985. He speaks at length about Clive Charles's career as a soccer coach at the University of Portland, particularly for the women's team, and describes how Charles's work as a coach led to the increased popularity of soccer in Portland and the formation of the Portland Thorns women's soccer team. He also talks about University of Portland player Tiffeny Milbrett. He shares the reasons why Charles remained in Portland rather than returning to England. He also talks about the soccer career of his niece, Portland Thorns player Christine Sinclair. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy of Clive Charles.

Gant, Brian R. (Brian Reginald), 1952-

United States District Court Oral History Project

  • USDCHS
  • Collection
  • 1966-2020 (bulk 1984-2008)

Since 1984, the Oregon Historical Society has partnered with the United States District Court of Oregon Historical Society to interview judges, lawyers and other legal professionals affiliated with that Court.
With an appeal rate at around 10%, the decisions made by the District Court of Oregon have been deeply influential on the laws and peoples of the state. It has presided over decisions on public land disputes and fishing rights, as well as civil rights and law enforcement. The stories of the people that make up this judicial body provide a valuable tool for helping the public understand the pivotal role the court has had on Oregon’s history.

United States District Court of Oregon Historical Society

The Immigrant Story Oral Histories

  • SR TIS
  • Collection
  • 2017 - 2020

The Immigrant Story is a private non-profit organization created by Sankar Raman in 2017 with the mission "to document, narrate, and curate the stories of immigrants in order to enhance empathy and help promote an inclusive community." Its goal is to both advance the national dialogue and to dispel myths about new Americans through strong, thoughtful narratives.

Raman, Sankar

Oral history interview with Joe Kye [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Joe Kye was conducted by Sankar Raman and Allison Merkel on December 23, 2020. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted remotely using Cleanfeed software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this interview, Kye discusses his family background and early life in Seoul, South Korea, and talks about his family's reasons for immigrating to the United States in 1993. He describes his experiences as a Korean immigrant in the U.S., including learning English, adjusting to American culture, and acting as a translator for his parents. He discusses his early interest in music and playing violin, talks about his early career ambitions, and shares his experiences at Yale University. He speaks about his reasons for not majoring in music at Yale, instead pursuing a career as a high school teacher; talks about his marriage to Natasha K. Kye; and discusses his decision to pursue a career as a musician. He speaks at length about the development of his music career in Sacramento, California, and in Portland, Oregon, and talks about telling stories while performing his music onstage. He closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of working as a musician as a new parent and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kye, Joe (Joseph Hyon), 1987-

Oral history interview with Joe Kye

This oral history interview with Joe Kye was conducted by Sankar Raman and Allison Merkel on December 23, 2020. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted remotely using Cleanfeed software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this interview, Kye discusses his family background and early life in Seoul, South Korea, and talks about his family's reasons for immigrating to the United States in 1993. He describes his experiences as a Korean immigrant in the U.S., including learning English, adjusting to American culture, and acting as a translator for his parents. He discusses his early interest in music and playing violin, talks about his early career ambitions, and shares his experiences at Yale University. He speaks about his reasons for not majoring in music at Yale, instead pursuing a career as a high school teacher; talks about his marriage to Natasha K. Kye; and discusses his decision to pursue a career as a musician. He speaks at length about the development of his music career in Sacramento, California, and in Portland, Oregon, and talks about telling stories while performing his music onstage. He closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of working as a musician as a new parent and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kye, Joe (Joseph Hyon), 1987-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd

This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-2022

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-2022

Oral history interview with Anna J. Brown

This oral history interview with Anna J. Brown was conducted by Jan Dilg in Portland, Oregon, from October 31, 2019, to October 8, 2020, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in eight sessions; the first sessions were conducted in Brown's chambers at the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse, and sessions six through eight were held at Brown's home.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 31, 2019, Brown discusses her family background, including the experiences of her parents in Germany during World War II, and their experiences as German immigrants in Portland in the 1950s and 1960s. She talks about her early life in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, including taking care of her mother after she had a stroke in 1968, her experiences as a child of German immigrants, and her education at Catholic schools. She discusses her college experience at Lewis and Clark College and at Portland State University. She then speaks about her experiences studying law at Northwestern College of Law and working as a law clerk. She talks about getting a job as a lawyer for the Bullivant firm in Portland, about her first day in court, and about her strategies as an introvert for managing the responsibilities of a lawyer and judge.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 13, 2019, Brown speaks further about many of the topics covered in the first session. She talks about her marriage to Paul Brown, and speaks at length about cases she worked on as a lawyer with the Bullivant law firm in Portland.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2020, Brown discusses her involvement in professional associations, including the Oregon State Bar, the Multnomah County Bar, and the Oregon Association of Defense Counsel. She shares her experiences as a woman in the legal profession in the 1980s, and talks about the importance of diversity on the bench. She speaks about her service as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1992 to 1994 and on the Multnomah County District Court from 1994 to 1999, including her appointment process and about learning how to be a judge on the job. She describes the differences between being a state judge and a federal judge, talks about cases she presided over, and discusses the use of technology in both state and federal courtrooms.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 6, 2020, Brown discusses her involvement with the Oregon Women Lawyers and the Oregon Women Judges associations. She speaks about the history of women on the Oregon bench, and further discusses her service on the Multnomah County Circuit and District courts. She describes the courtrooms she worked in, talks about people she worked with, and discusses how technology was used in courtrooms at the time of the interview. She talks about the case administration systems of the state and federal courts, discusses her experience presiding over Philip Morris v. Williams, and speaks about sentencing guidelines. She closes the session by summing up her legal career.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 20, 2020, Brown discusses her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1999 to the time of the interview. She speaks at length about her appointment and describes her investiture. She talks about her law clerks, about attending training for new judges, and about her fellow judges. She discusses how technology has changed the way judges and law clerks conduct research, talks about the cost of access to legal databases and research materials.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on September 3, 2020, Brown discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic and the George Floyd protests affected the operations of the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse during the summer of 2020. She then continues to discuss her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She speaks further about judges she worked with on the bench, and describes her early days as a District Court judge. She discusses the role of magistrate judges in the U.S. District Court of Oregon, talks about how the court protects witnesses, and discusses differences in the way districts operate. She discusses her process for making decisions and how the COVID-19 pandemic affected that process. She talks about the history of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, then shares her reasons for taking senior status in 2017.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on September 17, 2020, Brown continues to discuss her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She describes how she manages her courtroom, and talks about cases she heard, particularly cases regarding the federal no-fly list and the occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge. She talks about how she interacts with juries, about her involvement in professional associations, and about lawyers and judges who mentored her.

In the eighth and final interview session, conducted on October 8, 2020, Brown discusses her methods for mentoring aspiring lawyers, including through internships, high school mock trial programs, and speaking to law school students at Lewis and Clark College. She talks about her involvement with the Inns of Court association, about her official judicial portrait, and about receiving a lifetime service award from the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society. She shares her judicial philosophy and discusses how her background influences her philosophy. She then speaks further about her reasons for taking senior status in 2017 and about her activities since then. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Brown, Anna J., 1952-

Oral history interview with Anna J. Brown [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Anna J. Brown was conducted by Jan Dilg in Portland, Oregon, from October 31, 2019, to October 8, 2020, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in eight sessions; the first sessions were conducted in Brown's chambers at the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse, and sessions six through eight were held at Brown's home.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 31, 2019, Brown discusses her family background, including the experiences of her parents in Germany during World War II, and their experiences as German immigrants in Portland in the 1950s and 1960s. She talks about her early life in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, including taking care of her mother after she had a stroke in 1968, her experiences as a child of German immigrants, and her education at Catholic schools. She discusses her college experience at Lewis and Clark College and at Portland State University. She then speaks about her experiences studying law at Northwestern College of Law and working as a law clerk. She talks about getting a job as a lawyer for the Bullivant firm in Portland, about her first day in court, and about her strategies as an introvert for managing the responsibilities of a lawyer and judge.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 13, 2019, Brown speaks further about many of the topics covered in the first session. She talks about her marriage to Paul Brown, and speaks at length about cases she worked on as a lawyer with the Bullivant law firm in Portland.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2020, Brown discusses her involvement in professional associations, including the Oregon State Bar, the Multnomah County Bar, and the Oregon Association of Defense Counsel. She shares her experiences as a woman in the legal profession in the 1980s, and talks about the importance of diversity on the bench. She speaks about her service as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1992 to 1994 and on the Multnomah County District Court from 1994 to 1999, including her appointment process and about learning how to be a judge on the job. She describes the differences between being a state judge and a federal judge, talks about cases she presided over, and discusses the use of technology in both state and federal courtrooms.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 6, 2020, Brown discusses her involvement with the Oregon Women Lawyers and the Oregon Women Judges associations. She speaks about the history of women on the Oregon bench, and further discusses her service on the Multnomah County Circuit and District courts. She describes the courtrooms she worked in, talks about people she worked with, and discusses how technology was used in courtrooms at the time of the interview. She talks about the case administration systems of the state and federal courts, discusses her experience presiding over Philip Morris v. Williams, and speaks about sentencing guidelines. She closes the session by summing up her legal career.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 20, 2020, Brown discusses her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1999 to the time of the interview. She speaks at length about her appointment and describes her investiture. She talks about her law clerks, about attending training for new judges, and about her fellow judges. She discusses how technology has changed the way judges and law clerks conduct research, talks about the cost of access to legal databases and research materials.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on September 3, 2020, Brown discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic and the George Floyd protests affected the operations of the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse during the summer of 2020. She then continues to discuss her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She speaks further about judges she worked with on the bench, and describes her early days as a District Court judge. She discusses the role of magistrate judges in the U.S. District Court of Oregon, talks about how the court protects witnesses, and discusses differences in the way districts operate. She discusses her process for making decisions and how the COVID-19 pandemic affected that process. She talks about the history of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, then shares her reasons for taking senior status in 2017.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on September 17, 2020, Brown continues to discuss her service as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She describes how she manages her courtroom, and talks about cases she heard, particularly cases regarding the federal no-fly list and the occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge. She talks about how she interacts with juries, about her involvement in professional associations, and about lawyers and judges who mentored her.

In the eighth and final interview session, conducted on October 8, 2020, Brown discusses her methods for mentoring aspiring lawyers, including through internships, high school mock trial programs, and speaking to law school students at Lewis and Clark College. She talks about her involvement with the Inns of Court association, about her official judicial portrait, and about receiving a lifetime service award from the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society. She shares her judicial philosophy and discusses how her background influences her philosophy. She then speaks further about her reasons for taking senior status in 2017 and about her activities since then. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Brown, Anna J., 1952-

Portland Jobs with Justice records

  • Coll 827
  • Collection
  • 1988 - 2019

Collection consists of the records of the Portland, Oregon coalition of Jobs with Justice, a national non-profit organization advocating for workers' rights. The records document several campaigns and other activities of the Portland branch from the tenure of its first executive director, Margaret Butler, from its founding in 1991 through 2016, and cover labor issues and actions primarily in the Pacific Northwest but also across the nation and the world.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Oral history interview with Van Tran [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Van Tran was conducted by Shea Seery and Sankar Raman in 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Tran discusses her family background and early life in Saigon, Vietnam, including her education, particularly learning languages, and her love of music. She shares her experiences during the Vietnam War. She talks about her father's work with the U.S. military and his imprisonment in a North Vietnamese camp. She shares her memories of the fall of Saigon in 1975, and describes her family's attempts to escape to the United States. She then describes the process of emigrating to the U.S. in 1985, including a stopover in the Philippines, where she taught English and met her future husband. She talks about her marriage in 1987, about raising a family in Stockton, California, and about opening Phở Lê, a Vietnamese restaurant in Camas, Washington, in 1991. She talks about the restaurant's success, about opening other locations in Portland and Vancouver, and about her and her husband's reasons for closing the Camas location. She also looks at photographs and talks about them.

Tran, Van Dung, 1957-

Oral history interview with Van Tran

This oral history interview with Van Tran was conducted by Shea Seery and Sankar Raman in 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Tran discusses her family background and early life in Saigon, Vietnam, including her education, particularly learning languages, and her love of music. She shares her experiences during the Vietnam War. She talks about her father's work with the U.S. military and his imprisonment in a North Vietnamese camp. She shares her memories of the fall of Saigon in 1975, and describes her family's attempts to escape to the United States. She then describes the process of emigrating to the U.S. in 1985, including a stopover in the Philippines, where she taught English and met her future husband. She talks about her marriage in 1987, about raising a family in Stockton, California, and about opening Phở Lê, a Vietnamese restaurant in Camas, Washington, in 1991. She talks about the restaurant's success, about opening other locations in Portland and Vancouver, and about her and her husband's reasons for closing the Camas location. She also looks at photographs and talks about them.

Tran, Van Dung, 1957-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting [Session 02]

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting’s views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting’s work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting

  • SR 1092
  • Collection
  • 2019-07-01 - 2019-12-02

This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Anne Johnson

This oral history interview with Anne Johnson was conducted by Julianna Robidoux and Monica Salazar on November 29, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Sankar Raman was also present.

In this interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Nairobi, Kenya, including her education. She talks about turning her love of creative pursuits into a tea and chocolate business in Oregon. She discusses her reasons for relocating to Portland, Oregon, for college. She describes the tea sommelier course she took, talks about starting her business, and discusses ethically sourcing her products. She talks about her partnership with her husband, Mark Johnson, about the importance of tea in her family life, and about her reasons for including chocolate in her business. She talks about her future plans for Mamancy Tea Co. She closes the interview by discussing discrimination that she experienced as a Black woman and an immigrant.

Johnson, Anne, 1978-

Oral history interview with Anne Johnson [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Anne Johnson was conducted by Julianna Robidoux and Monica Salazar on November 29, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Sankar Raman was also present.

In this interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Nairobi, Kenya, including her education. She talks about turning her love of creative pursuits into a tea and chocolate business in Oregon. She discusses her reasons for relocating to Portland, Oregon, for college. She describes the tea sommelier course she took, talks about starting her business, and discusses ethically sourcing her products. She talks about her partnership with her husband, Mark Johnson, about the importance of tea in her family life, and about her reasons for including chocolate in her business. She talks about her future plans for Mamancy Tea Co. She closes the interview by discussing discrimination that she experienced as a Black woman and an immigrant.

Johnson, Anne, 1978-

Oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian was conducted by Sankar Raman and Nancy E. Dollahite on November 8, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Nazemian discusses his family background and early life in Paris, France; Toronto, Canada; and New York City. He shares the reasons his family left Iran for France, then Canada; talks about his experience growing up multilingual and about raising his own children to also be multilingual; and about adjusting to life in the United States. He discusses his cultural and ethnic identity, and his identity as a gay man, and talks about how those identities inform his writing. He speaks about his experiences and education at a boarding school in New York, talks about coming out to his family in his twenties, and describes his early career as a screenwriter in Los Angeles, California. He speaks at length about writing books telling queer Iranian stories, and about his writing process. He closes the interview by talking about how the AIDS pandemic affected him, by describing the themes of his novels, and by discussing public reception of his novels.

Nazemian, Abdi

Oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian

This oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian was conducted by Sankar Raman and Nancy E. Dollahite on November 8, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Nazemian discusses his family background and early life in Paris, France; Toronto, Canada; and New York City. He shares the reasons his family left Iran for France, then Canada; talks about his experience growing up multilingual and about raising his own children to also be multilingual; and about adjusting to life in the United States. He discusses his cultural and ethnic identity, and his identity as a gay man, and talks about how those identities inform his writing. He speaks about his experiences and education at a boarding school in New York, talks about coming out to his family in his twenties, and describes his early career as a screenwriter in Los Angeles, California. He speaks at length about writing books telling queer Iranian stories, and about his writing process. He closes the interview by talking about how the AIDS pandemic affected him, by describing the themes of his novels, and by discussing public reception of his novels.

Nazemian, Abdi

Oral history interview with Thomas M. Coffin

This oral history interview with Thomas M. Coffin was conducted by Makaela Kroin in Coffin's chambers at the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from May 2, 2018, to November 1, 2019, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on May 2, 2018, Coffin discusses his family background at length, beginning in the year 1066. He talks about his early life in St. Louis, Missouri, including his education, his childhood role models, and playing sports.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 4, 2018, Coffin discusses his college experiences at a Catholic seminary, at St. Benedict College in Atchinson, Kansas, and at Harvard Law School. He shares his reasons for choosing to attend seminary, and speaks further about his early life. He shares how his childhood and college experiences shaped his world outlook. He speaks at length about a college roommate who was later murdered as a result of working as an informant for the FBI; shares anecdotes about serving in the Reserve Officer Training Corps during the Vietnam War; and discusses his political views. He talks about his experiences as a volunteer defense attorney while a student at Harvard.

In the third interview session, conducted on October 5, 2018, Coffin discusses working as a federal prosecutor for the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego, California, from 1971 to 1980. He speaks at length about cases he tried, particularly drug-related cases. He discusses how he grew as a trial lawyer and shares his prosecutorial philosophy. He also shares his thoughts about the U.S. government's treatment of immigrants and refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border at the time of the interview. He then talks about his marriage to Penelope Teaff, and shares a story about an encounter with the Hells Angels.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on April 17, 2019, Coffin shares his reasons for moving to the Pacific Northwest and discusses his work as a federal prosecutor at the U.S. attorney's office in Eugene, Oregon, from 1980 to 1992. He describes how the Eugene office grew, talks about his work on methamphetamine-related cases, and discusses his relationship with the district attorney's office. He talks about how he continued to develop as a prosecutor during his time at the Eugene U.S. attorney's office, and speaks further about his prosecutorial philosophy. He talks about raising a family in Eugene. He then talks about his service as a magistrate judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He discusses some of the cases he handled, particularly a case involving disability discrimination in golf. He describes the District Court's use of pre-trial conferences, and talks about working on settlements.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on May 9, 2019, Coffin continues to discuss his service as a magistrate judge. He talks about the importance of integrity as a judge, shares his concerns regarding the political climate at the time of the interview, and discusses how his work as a prosecutor prepared him for the role of judge. He speaks further about the case regarding disability discrimination in golf, discusses his process for writing opinions, and shares his reasons for occasionally delivering oral opinions. He also tells a story about a memorable case he prosecuted in San Diego. He speaks further about his reasons for moving to the Pacific Northwest in 1980.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 1, 2019, Coffin continues to discuss his service as a magistrate judge, talks about cases he heard, and shares his judicial philosophy. He speaks further about his concerns regarding the U.S. government's treatment of refugees and immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border at the time of the interview. He shares personal anecdotes, talks further about mediating settlements, and discusses his recreational activities. He shares his opinion of President Donald J. Trump and Republican politics at the time of the interview.

Coffin, Thomas M. (Thomas Michael), 1945-

Oral history interview with Thomas M. Coffin [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Thomas M. Coffin was conducted by Makaela Kroin in Coffin's chambers at the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from May 2, 2018, to November 1, 2019, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on May 2, 2018, Coffin discusses his family background at length, beginning in the year 1066. He talks about his early life in St. Louis, Missouri, including his education, his childhood role models, and playing sports.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 4, 2018, Coffin discusses his college experiences at a Catholic seminary, at St. Benedict College in Atchinson, Kansas, and at Harvard Law School. He shares his reasons for choosing to attend seminary, and speaks further about his early life. He shares how his childhood and college experiences shaped his world outlook. He speaks at length about a college roommate who was later murdered as a result of working as an informant for the FBI; shares anecdotes about serving in the Reserve Officer Training Corps during the Vietnam War; and discusses his political views. He talks about his experiences as a volunteer defense attorney while a student at Harvard.

In the third interview session, conducted on October 5, 2018, Coffin discusses working as a federal prosecutor for the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego, California, from 1971 to 1980. He speaks at length about cases he tried, particularly drug-related cases. He discusses how he grew as a trial lawyer and shares his prosecutorial philosophy. He also shares his thoughts about the U.S. government's treatment of immigrants and refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border at the time of the interview. He then talks about his marriage to Penelope Teaff, and shares a story about an encounter with the Hells Angels.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on April 17, 2019, Coffin shares his reasons for moving to the Pacific Northwest and discusses his work as a federal prosecutor at the U.S. attorney's office in Eugene, Oregon, from 1980 to 1992. He describes how the Eugene office grew, talks about his work on methamphetamine-related cases, and discusses his relationship with the district attorney's office. He talks about how he continued to develop as a prosecutor during his time at the Eugene U.S. attorney's office, and speaks further about his prosecutorial philosophy. He talks about raising a family in Eugene. He then talks about his service as a magistrate judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He discusses some of the cases he handled, particularly a case involving disability discrimination in golf. He describes the District Court's use of pre-trial conferences, and talks about working on settlements.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on May 9, 2019, Coffin continues to discuss his service as a magistrate judge. He talks about the importance of integrity as a judge, shares his concerns regarding the political climate at the time of the interview, and discusses how his work as a prosecutor prepared him for the role of judge. He speaks further about the case regarding disability discrimination in golf, discusses his process for writing opinions, and shares his reasons for occasionally delivering oral opinions. He also tells a story about a memorable case he prosecuted in San Diego. He speaks further about his reasons for moving to the Pacific Northwest in 1980.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 1, 2019, Coffin continues to discuss his service as a magistrate judge, talks about cases he heard, and shares his judicial philosophy. He speaks further about his concerns regarding the U.S. government's treatment of refugees and immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border at the time of the interview. He shares personal anecdotes, talks further about mediating settlements, and discusses his recreational activities. He shares his opinion of President Donald J. Trump and Republican politics at the time of the interview.

Coffin, Thomas M. (Thomas Michael), 1945-

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