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Oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand

This oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from November 5, 1991, to October 27, 1993. In this interview, Hand discusses her family background and early life in Baker and Portland, Oregon, including her early education and social life. She talks about attending Reed College, her marriage to Floyd Orville Hand, and her activities while Floyd was serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, including working in the Portland shipyards. She then talks about her involvement in local transportation issues, which led to her involvement with the Democratic Party. She talks about serving as a precinct committee person for the Democratic Party, and working with Monroe Sweetland. She also talks about serving as State Representative Richard Groener's secretary and about the practical jokes Groener played.

Hand talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1966. She discusses her campaigns, her committee assignments, and her fellow legislators. She talks about some of the legislation she worked on, including regarding public transportation, state parks, public utility districts, and civil defense funding. She talks about her experience contracting tuberculosis at age 30, her treatment, and her opposition to the closure of the Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital in Salem, as well as her opinion of the level of care being provided by Fairview Hospital. She discusses friction with Speaker of the House Monte Montgomery; her opposition to the storage of nerve gas in Oregon; and the changes in the Legislature since the end of her service.

Hand talks about her activities since leaving the Legislature in 1966. She talks about lobbying for the National Association of Retired Federal Employees. She describes her unsuccessful campaigns for the Oregon Senate and Oregon secretary of state. She closes the interview by talking about her experience as a delegate to the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

Hand, Beulah J. (Beulah Joan Caviness), 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan

This oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on June 29, 1993. In this interview, Boe-Duncan discusses her memories of legislative historian Cecil L. Edwards. She talks about the close relationship between Edwards and her late husband, Oregon State Senator Jason Boe; Edwards' political beliefs; Edwards' retirement in 1976; and Boe's creation of the position of legislative historian for him. She shares several anecdotes about Edwards that demonstrate his personality and discusses her own relationship with him. She closes the interview by discussing what was expected of her as a legislator's wife.

Boe-Duncan, Kathryn, 1930-

Oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott

This oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott was conducted by Clark Hansen at Hendershott's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16, 1993, to January 13, 1994. In this interview, Hendershott discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his social life, his memories of Armistice Day in 1918, and his interest in skiing. He also talks about his memories of the 1929 stock market crash and the Depression that followed. He talks about attending the University of Oregon from 1931 to 1936, including a description of the campus and his professors. He then discusses serving as district attorney for Hood River County from 1936 to 1938, and talks about practicing law in Eugene, including judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled. He also talks about other lawyers that he admired. He describes his experience serving in Europe in the U.S. Army during World War II. He speaks briefly about his two marriages and his family life.

Hendershott discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1947 to 1949. He talks about his campaign; the 1947 plane crash that killed the governor, the secretary of state, and the president of the Senate; and juggling his service in the Legislature with his family life and his law practice. He talks about his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and some of his fellow legislators. He discusses some of the issues that were important during his time in the Legislature, including taxes and public utilities.

Hedershott discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about serving as city attorney for Eugene from 1959 to 1971; Martin Luther King Day celebrations and the black community; and hosting foreign exchange students. He speaks about his law practice, including arguing cases and the changes in the court system. He discusses traveling in Europe, in the Middle East, and in Asia. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his family background and legal career.

Hendershott, Herman P. (Herman Phipps), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus

  • SR 9407
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-03

This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman

  • SR 9042
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-17

This oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Eugene, Oregon, on September 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Freeman discusses her early life on a farm in Colton, Oregon; attending Oregon State University; and working as a math teacher in Oregon and California. She then talks about settling in Eugene after her marriage to Neil Freeman, and about teaching mathematics at the University of Oregon from 1943 to 1949. She discusses how her involvement in Lane County politics began with a Democratic speechwriting contest in which she took second place, losing to future U. S. Rep. Edith Green. She talks about serving as precinct committee chair, her involvement with the League of Women Voters, and running for the Oregon Legislature in 1952. She discusses her reasons for joining the Democratic Party and her campaign for Lane County treasurer. She speaks at length about her accomplishments as treasurer. Freeman talks about feeling as if the county commissioners didn't hold the office of treasurer in high esteem and how that pushed her to run for Lane County clerk in 1960. She discusses her accomplishments as county clerk, then describes how the office of county clerk was changed to an appointed position rather than elected, which led to her losing the position. She closes the interview by talking about her activities during retirement, including freelance writing.

Freeman, Olga Samuelson, 1903-1997

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

  • SR 11133
  • Collection
  • 2003-08-18

This oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland was conducted by John Moltman at Sweetland's home in Milwaukie, Oregon. The recording of Moltman's interview with Sweetland is incomplete. According to the audio, the interview was conducted in multiple sessions; this recording includes only one session, which was conducted on August 18, 2003. No other recordings from the interview were among those donated to the Oregon Historical Research Library in 2007.

In this interview, Sweetland discusses his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy during the Depression and his parents' disapproval. He talks about meeting Lil Megrath and their subsequent marriage. He describes organizing Student L.I.D. conferences and establishing chapters across the country. He talks about advocating for civil rights and the opposition he faced, particularly in the South. He also talks about socialism and how it differs from communism, as well as the growing socialist movement among students and labor during the 1930s. He discusses his involvement with the Socialist Party, including his friendship with Socialist Party leader Norman Thomas, and the socialist underpinnings of the New Deal. He gives a brief history of the evolution of the Democratic and Republican parties over the 20th century, and of progressive political movements. He shares anecdotes about his activities with the Student L.I.D., including participating in sit-down strikes and being arrested.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Michael S. Lincicum

This oral history interview with Michael S. Lincicum was conducted by John P. Strassmaier from January 11 to April 6, 2011. In this interview, Lincicum discusses family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early education. He discusses attending Willamette University, particularly his role as president of his fraternity. He talks about attending the University of Wisconsin and his transfer to the University of Oregon. He also talks about student protests against the Vietnam War and his feelings about the prospect of being drafted. He describes how his status as a conscientious objector led to a job working for the Oregon Educational Coordinating Commission. He describes conducting a study on education programs for children with disabilities and speaks at length about the reforms that were underway during Governor Tom McCall's administration. He also discusses his other duties at the commission. He then talks about working as a budget analyst under Robert W. Smith for the Oregon Budget and Management Division. He describes Smith's philosophy of budget analysis; his first assignment as budget analyst for the Mental Health Division; and the process of calculating budgets without computers. He describes the workplace culture in state government and how it changed under different governors. Lincicum discusses working as administrative services director for the Oregon Children Services Department, then in the Oregon Mental Health Services Department. He speaks at length about mismanagement of Mental Health Services, particularly at Fairview Hospital. He also talks about his brief time as acting director of Mental Health Services; the decertification and re-certification of Fairview Hospital; a state employee strike in the late 1980s; and personnel changes at the various state hospitals. He talks about the closure of Damasch Hospital; leaving the Mental Health Services Department; working as an administrator for the Oregon Health Plan; and returning to the Budget and Management Division. He speaks at length about political appointees he's worked with and other state departments he did projects for, particularly the Department of Motor Vehicles. He talks about his job duties leading up to his retirement in 2000. He closes the interview by talking about his retirement activities.

Lincicum, Michael S., 1946-

Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 9065
  • Collection
  • 1982-01-14

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in the Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon, on January 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life, particularly how her family was affected by the Depression. She talks about leaving Nebraska for Oregon due to the Dust Bowl drought, picking hops as seasonal workers, and growing up on an oil rig in Burns, Oregon. She talks about being unable to afford college even with scholarships, working for the Harney County district attorney, and moving to Salem to work as a legal secretary. She also describes having polio at age 19. She then talks about working as a legal secretary for the Oregon Supreme Court, her involvement with the Pentacle Theatre in Salem, and her studies at Willamette University Law School. She discusses working for state Senator Wally Carson. She then talks about running for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1970 and the opposition she faced due to her gender; learning about and embracing feminism; and other women in the Legislature. She closes the interview by talking about her decision to run for Oregon secretary of state in 1976.

Paulus, Norma

Oral history interview with Charles P. Duffy

This oral history interview with Charles P. Duffy was conducted by Sandra Duffy from May 20 to August 3, 1993. In this interview, Duffy discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon; his service in the U.S. Army during World War II; and attending the University of Washington. He then discusses practicing law beginning in 1940. He describes arguing cases before judges James Alger Fee, Claude McColloch, and Gus Solomon. He describes some of the cases he worked on, particularly regarding tax laws. He also talks about arguing cases against U.S. attorneys; his involvement with various civic and social organizations; and his marriage to Patricia Ann McKenna and their children. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his family background and early life and discussing his retirement activities.

Duffy, Charles P. (Charles Patrick), 1915-2001

Oral history interview with Carl Burnham, Jr.

This oral history interview with Carl Burnham, Jr. was conducted by Timothy J. Helfrich at Black Butte Ranch, Oregon, on June 21, 2002. In this interview, Burnham discusses coming to Ontario, Oregon, in 1964 to practice law at Yturri, O'Keefe, and Cox. He describes many of the judges and lawyers in Malheur County, as well as some cases he handled.

Burnham, Carl Von Hoffman, Jr., 1939-

Oral history interview with Robert A. Leedy

This oral history interview with Robert A. Leedy was conducted by Anna J. Brown and Katherine H. O'Neil at Leedy's home in Milwaukie, Oregon, from September 10 to October 1, 1994. In this interview, Leedy discusses his family background and early life in the rural areas around Portland, Oregon, including his education and the family farm. He then discusses studying law at the University of Oregon, including his social life and working in a can factory to pay tuition. He also describes some of the members of his graduating class, including Otto Frohnmayer. He talks about getting started in law practice in Portland, including some of the lawyers he worked with and cases he was involved in. He also speaks at length about his interest in golf and how it led to his becoming a U.S. commissioner for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He briefly discusses forming the law firm of Barzee, Leedy & Keene. He describes the duties and procedures of the U.S. District Court of Oregon commissioner, as well as some of the judges he worked with, particularly Judge James Alger Fee. He speaks at length about the bail process and several of the cases he heard. He then discusses his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, including administering the bar exam in the 1940s, and serving as president in the 1950s. He speaks at length about his children, their families, and their careers. He also describes in great detail several European trips he took, beginning in the 1950s, as well as trips to Hawaii and to Death Valley, California. He discusses his involvement with the Episcopal Church. He goes on to talk about some of the cases he worked on in private law practice, as well as the lawyers he's worked with. He closes the interview by discussing some of the changes in the law profession over the years.

Leedy, Robert A., Sr. (Robert Allan), 1909-2001

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from May 10, 1985, to September 3, 1986. The audio for this interview is incomplete; Tape 22 was discovered to be blank in 2020, but its content is represented in both an incomplete transcript and a completed index.

In this interview, Goodwin discusses his family background and early life in Bellingham, Washington, and Portland and Prineville, Oregon, including his early education, his memories of the Depression, and life on a farm. He talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including his social life. He speaks at length about his Army service in Europe during World War II, including his experiences in combat and freeing prisoners. He also talks about his marriages and family life. He discusses returning to the University of Oregon to study law, and how his background in journalism influenced his decision-making as a judge. He speaks at length about working for the Eugene Register-Guard newspaper, as well as his support for and later disillusionment with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse.

Goodwin discusses practicing law in Eugene. He talks about cases he argued, including as a court-appointed lawyer. He also talks about his involvement in the Republican Party, including serving as a precinct committee member. He discusses serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including his appointment and later re-election, cases he heard, and his decision-making process. He then discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court, including his appointment and later re-election, his fellow justices, and some of the cases they heard. He talks about opinions he wrote, as well as his involvement in the effort to revise the Oregon state constitution in the 1960s. He discusses the changes in laws regarding the criminal code and civil rights, and how that affected the decisions of the Oregon Supreme Court. He also discusses his views on the Vietnam War, the criminalization of drug use, and the civil rights movement of the 1960s. He discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including his appointment and confirmation, his fellow judges, and some of the cases he heard. He discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, including his appointment and confirmation; cases he heard, particularly concerning immigration and anti-trust law; and his opinion on Roe v. Wade. He also discusses the role of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, his fellow judges, and his involvement with the American Bar Association. He talks about continuing education opportunities for members of the judiciary; his children, their careers, and their families; and his involvement with the Presbyterian Church. He closes the interview by discussing his move to California.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from May 25, 1988, to May 2, 1990. In this interview, Frank discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early education and the Meier & Frank department store, his family's business. He talks briefly about attending Stanford University, then discusses his Army service in Europe during World War II and his studies at Cambridge University in England. He talks about returning to Portland to work at Meier & Frank.

Frank speaks at length about Mark Hatfield's family background and early life. He talks about Hatfield's early political career, spirituality, and marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich. He talks about the 1965 sale of Meier & Frank, and his subsequent deeper involvement with Hatfield's political career. He discusses his economic planning work on the Governor's Advisory Committee, working with Glenn Jackson, and the Republican Party in Oregon. He talks about Hatfield's elections; Hatfield's brush with the vice presidential nomination in 1968; and Hatfield's working relationships with Oregon state legislators. He describes Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well of some of Hatfield's other controversial positions. He then talks about going to Washington, D.C., his duties as a member of Hatfield's staff, and other members of Hatfield's staff. He also talks about the conflict between Hatfield's liberal views and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He speaks at length about running Hatfield's office, including managing correspondence and staff, and contracting with the Herman Miller company for furniture. He discusses the ways in which Hatfield remains connected to his constituency; the areas in which he disagrees with Hatfield; and how they handled a real estate scandal during Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign. He discusses his personal activities, including writing an Oregon guidebook and his involvement with various organizations. He closes the interview by talking about how he first became acquainted with Mark Hatfield; Hatfield's political agenda; and issues contemporary to the interview session in 1990, including environmental concerns about logging and the proposed division of the Ninth Circuit Court.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Loren D. Hicks

This oral history interview with Loren D. Hicks was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from April 18 to May 6, 1988. The audio recording of the interview sessions is out of order, with the end of the interview on the last half of Tape 7, Side 1.

In this interview, Hicks discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his early education. He talks about attending Willamette University for both his undergraduate and law degrees, including his social life, his Army service during World War II, and his marriage to Muriel Thomson. He discusses practicing law in Salem and running a farm.

Hicks describes the beginnings of his association with Mark Hatfield. He discusses what he knows about Hatfield's Navy service during World War II. He speaks about serving as assistant attorney general during Hatfield's tenure as Oregon secretary of state, including cases he handled and the occasional conflict of interest that arose. He also talks about Hatfield's 1960 campaign for Oregon governor. He then discusses serving as legal assistant to Hatfield during his governorship. He describes the other members of Hatfield's staff; the difference between his position as legal assistant and as assistant attorney general; and some of the legal issues he handled for Hatfield. He talks about Hatfield's rivalry with U.S. Attorney Robert Y. Thornton; negotiating with the Shell Oil Company; and Hatfield's relationships with Travis Cross and Gerry Frank. He speaks at length about a trip he took with Hatfield to South America, particularly describing Argentina and Brazil, as well as attending governors' conferences. He talks about extraditions, death penalty cases, and the Seaside riots of 1962. He also talks about an explosion in Roseburg, the Columbus Day Storm, and a flood in 1964. He discusses some minor political scandals, many of the appointments Hatfield made as governor, and the lease of property in Boardman to Boeing.

He closes the interview with a discussion of his appointment as a judge on the Circuit Court of Marion County, as well as his continued association with Mark Hatfield.

Hicks, Loren D. (Loren DeGuire), 1919-2014

Oral history interview with Wesley Granberg-Michaelson

This oral history interview with Wesley Granberg-Michaelson was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Parkridge, Illinois, and in San Antonio, Texas, from October 18, 1988, to May 28, 1989. In this interview, Granberg-Michaelson discusses his family background and early life in the Chicago, Illinois, area, including his early education. He tells the story of meeting Oregon Governor Mark Hatfield at the 1960 Republican National Convention when he was a teenager. He speaks at length about his evangelical Christian faith, his involvement in the Young Life movement, and how both permeated his political views. He speaks about his experiences at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, including his views on the Vietnam War at that time. He then discusses his experience at the Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey, including some of the courses he took and how his view of the Vietnam War evolved.

Granberg-Michaelson talks about meeting Mark Hatfield at the National Prayer Breakfast in 1968, and how that led to an internship with Hatfield, who had become a U.S. senator. He describes his duties as an intern, his promotion to full-time staff a year later, and working with other members of Hatfield's staff. He discusses his role as foreign policy advisor, particularly regarding the Vietnam War; Hatfield's relationship with President Richard Nixon; and Hatfield's relationship with his fellow members of Congress. He speaks at length about Hatfield's efforts to end the Vietnam War, including the McGovern-Hatfield amendment of 1970. He also talks about Hatfield's re-election campaign in 1972; Hatfield's spirituality; and Hatfield's opposition to nuclear weapons and power. He discusses his reasons for leaving Hatfield's staff in 1976.

Granberg-Michaelson discusses his personal life during his time as a member of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's relationship with the evangelical community, and how Hatfield balanced his ideals with the need to compromise. He discusses his international travels, his marriage to Karen Granberg, and the protests against the draft and the Vietnam War. He speaks about the differences in management style between Sam Mallicoat and Gerry Frank, Hatfield's stance on Israel and Palestine, and a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign. He discusses Hatfield's legislative efforts toward decentralizing government. He closes the interview by talking about Hatfield's family and personal life, and his own recent activities.

Granberg-Michaelson, Wesley

Oral history interview with Lois D. Siegmund

This oral history interview with Lois D. Siegmund was conducted by Clark Hansen at Siegmund's home in Salem, Oregon, on June 23, 1988. In this interview, Siegmund discusses her early life in Gervais, Oregon, including her memories of life during World War I. She then discusses her early career in state government, her marriage to Jacob Laurence Siegmund, and quitting state government to work in a meat market with her husband. Siegmund then discusses returning to state government in 1951 as a legislative secretary, first for Representative Roy Houck, then for Representative Mark Hatfield. She talks about Hatfield's campaign for the state Senate in 1954 and about working as a secretary for him in the Senate. She also discusses Hatfield's campaign for Oregon secretary of state in 1956. She describes her duties as Hatfield's personal secretary, other members of Hatfield's staff, and Hatfield's marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich.

Siegmund then discusses Hatfield's 1958 campaign for Oregon governor. She talks about the changes in Hatfield's staff after his election. She shares anecdotes about major events that occurred during his governorship, including the 1962 Columbus Day Storm, Hatfield's 1964 keynote speech at the Republican National Convention, and her role in keeping Hatfield on schedule. She also talks about Hatfield's relationship with Tom McCall, his campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1967, and her reasons for not going with him to Washington, D.C. She closes the interview by discussing her continued relationship with Hatfield.

Siegmund, Lois D. (Lois Dejardin), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Bud Clark

  • SR 2084
  • Collection
  • 1995-04-06

This oral history interview with Bud Clark was conducted by Joseph W. Carlisle on April 6, 1995. The equipment used to record this interview was faulty, causing the tape speed to vary widely. Digitized audio files made from the recording have been adjusted for ease of listening.

In this interview, Clark discusses transportation in Portland, including bicycles and the public transportation system, TriMet. He focuses particularly on the construction of the TriMet light-rail system, MAX. He discusses outdoor recreation in Portland. He then talks about his family background and early life in Portland. He also discusses his experiences at Vanport College (now Portland State University) and at Reed College. He talks about the livability and climate of Oregon, particularly the city of Portland.

Clark discusses the impact of urban renewal on Portland. He discusses running the Drop In Tavern, which he renamed the Spoutin' House; the tavern's location near Portland State University; and how urban renewal forced him out of business. He then talks about purchasing Ann's Tavern, which he renamed the Goose Hollow Inn. He speaks at length about his opinion of urban renewal at the time it was happening in the 1950s and 1960s, and his opinion of it in retrospect. Clark closes the interview by briefly discussing the urban renewal policies he put in place as mayor of Portland from 1984 to 1992.

Clark, Bud (J. E. "Bud")

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer

This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006. In this interview, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde, and some of the opinions he wrote. He closes the interview by discussing the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government; changes in the judiciary; and his advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Kimberlee Van Patten, by Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood

Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood, PSU students, interviewed Kimberlee Van Patten on February 12th 2009. Kimberlee Van Patten has been involved with the Imperial Sovereign Rose Court and Peacock in the Park for several years. During the interview we discussed her life in general, from her childhood to the present, as well as her involvement with both the Court and Peacock in the Park. Kimberlee told us a little about Lady Elaine Peacock and the Audria M. Edwards Scholarship Fund and also about many of the members of the Rose Court. We discussed other new projects she is working on and her favorite memories and some sad moments from the projects that she has worked on in the past.

Van Patten, Kimberlee

Oral history interview with Charles F. Hinkle, by Michael Lamore and Michelle Brown

This is the first interview with Charles Hinkle. The second interview will be during Spring term 2009.
This interview was taken for the Gay and Lesbian Pacific Northwest Archive and conducted by, Michael Lamore and Michelle Brown, who are Portland State University students working with the LGBTQ capstone class. They interviewed Charles F. Hinkle who has been an ACLU lawyer in Portland for over 30 years. Hinkle was involved in the Black civil rights movement in the 60’s while working on his degree and took Oregon’s first gay rights case of a teacher being fired for her sexual orientation, Peggy Burton, in 1972. Hinkle has been involved in gay civil rights cases ever since. He has been known as a strong ally and advocate to the gay community for many years. His involvement in gay rights in Oregon has a large legacy, but due to time constraints this interview covered his involvement from 1972-1988.

Hinkle, Charles F.

Oral history interview with George Oberg, by Brian Aune and Heather Burmeister

George Oberg lives in Vancouver, Washington. He was the first president of the Second Foundation, which was a gay rights organization during the 1970s. During the interview, he talks about the early gay rights movement as well as the AIDS crisis of the 1980s. He talks about how his partner died of AIDS.

Oberg, George

Oral history interview with Charles F. Hinkle, by Nichant Mehra, Nathan Guynn and Michael Pratt

This interview is the 2nd of two separate interviews conducted in 2009. Hinkle focuses on the No On 9 campaign and his efforts in defeating Ballot Measure 9. Also discussed is the Oregon Citizens Alliance and its leaders, Lon Mabon and Scott Lively (whom Hinkle debated in a well-known Town Council broadcast.)

Hinkle, Charles F.

Oral history interview with Linda Rae Besant, by Emma Bagley and Emily Kahnert

Besant discusses her involvement in the earliest incarnation of the vocal group The Dyketones; coming out in her early thirties (to herself & to her family); her commitment to Women In the Wilderness (aka Keep Listening); her life with her partner, Marcia; and the community at the Mountain Moving Cafe in the 1980s.

Besant, Linda

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