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Oregon Black History Project records

  • Mss 2854
  • Collection
  • 1844-1981

The Oregon Black History Project was a grant-funded project that conducted research on the history of African-Americans in Oregon up to the beginning of World War II. The project was directed by Elizabeth McLagan and culminated in her book "A Peculiar Paradise: A History of Blacks in Oregon, 1788-1940," which was published by the Georgian Press of Portland, Oregon, in 1980.

The collection consists of administrative records, research files, and photographs gathered or created by the Oregon Black History Project. Most of the research files consist of notes and quotes, photocopies, or excerpts from primary and secondary resources concerning the history of African-Americans in Oregon from the late 18th century to the mid-20th century. Most of these source excerpts were assembled between 1976 and 1979. Topics include early African-American emigrants to Oregon; the slavery debate in Oregon; exclusion laws and other forms of discrimination or violence against African-Americans; African-American business, social, and activist organizations; and early 20th-century African-American newspapers such as The Advocate, the New Age, and the Portland Times.

Photographs include portraits of African-American Oregonians; African-American social groups and activities; residences; and businesses operated by African-Americans in Portland, Oregon. Some of the photographs are copies of images originally published in newspapers such as Portland Times and The Advocate.

McLagan, Elizabeth, 1947-

Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series

  • SR Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series
  • Collection
  • 1981?

A series of lectures given by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on the importance of preserving the Columbia River Gorge.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-1986

Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 9065
  • Collection
  • 1982-01-14

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in the Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon, on January 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life, particularly how her family was affected by the Depression. She talks about leaving Nebraska for Oregon due to the Dust Bowl drought, picking hops as seasonal workers, and growing up on an oil rig in Burns, Oregon. She talks about being unable to afford college even with scholarships, working for the Harney County district attorney, and moving to Salem to work as a legal secretary. She also describes having polio at age 19. She then talks about working as a legal secretary for the Oregon Supreme Court, her involvement with the Pentacle Theatre in Salem, and her studies at Willamette University Law School. She discusses working for state Senator Wally Carson. She then talks about running for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1970 and the opposition she faced due to her gender; learning about and embracing feminism; and other women in the Legislature. She closes the interview by talking about her decision to run for Oregon secretary of state in 1976.

Paulus, Norma

Oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk

  • SR 9467
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-18 - 1982-01-20

This oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Maryville Nursing Home in Beaverton, Oregon, from December 18, 1981, to January 20, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. Sister Peter Kump was also present for the entire interview, and Catherine Emmons Lusk was present for the interview session on January 20, 1982.

In this interview, Lusk discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from the East Coast in 1909 and his impressions of Oregon. He talks about practicing law in Portland and his marriage to Catherine Emmons. He discusses handling the case of the 1922 Oregon Compulsory School Bill and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court. He briefly speaks about serving as a judge on the Oregon Circuit Court and as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court, as well as serving in the U.S. Senate for a few months in 1960, including working with Senator Wayne Morse.

Lusk, Hall Stoner, 1883-1993

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Potter, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9313
  • Collection
  • 1982-01-25

Potter discusses her education in art and architecture history at University of Oregon and Penn State, her involvement in the passage of the 1966 National Historic Preservation Act, and her work with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Register of Historic Places.

Potter, Elisabeth Walton, 1939-

Oral history interview with Red Dunning, by Kathy Walsh

  • SR 9345
  • Collection
  • 1982-03-01

Dunning discusses his career as a musician and music director at KOIN and the shows he had on KOIN-TV. He also discusses his interest in nature photography.

Dunning, Owen C., 1904-1982

Oral history interview with Margaret G. Fritsch

  • SR 9318
  • Collection
  • 1982-03-29

This oral history interview with Margaret G. Fritsch was conducted by Linda S. Dodds on March 29, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Fritsch discusses her family background and early life in Salem, Oregon. She talks about studying architecture at the University of Oregon, including the discrimination she faced as a woman. She then discusses her career as an architect, including the process of obtaining a license and some of the buildings she designed early in her career. She also talks about serving as secretary of the Oregon State Board of Architect Examiners. Fritsch discusses some of the architects she worked with, including Jamieson Parker and A.E. Doyle. She also talks about the architecture career of her husband, Frederick Fritsch. She briefly talks about adopting a child after Frederick Fritsch's death in 1934. She describes the effect the Depression had on their careers. She talks about working as a city planner for Juneau, Alaska, and her retirement in 1974. She closes the interview by talking about working with craftspeople; designing plinths for public art; and changes in the field of architecture.

Fritsch, Margaret G., 1899-1993

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 9431
  • Collection
  • 1982-05-14

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on May 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Edwards discusses his duties regarding the selection of horses as a civilian agent for the Remount Service during World War II. He talks about the history of the American Remount Service and how the horses were used during both war and peacetime. He also discusses his duties selecting dogs for military use. He then talks about serving on the Oregon Racing Commission under Governor Douglas O. McKay after the war. He briefly describes lobbying for the Oregon State Cattlemen's Association and working as chief clerk of the Oregon House of Representatives. He then speaks at length about his experiences as secretary of the Senate. He talks about the changes in the Legislature during the 20th century, including salaries, staff sizes, and session length. He tells the story of discovering that the federal government owed a debt to Oregon dating back to the Civil War. Edwards talks about the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935, the places where the Legislature convened afterwards, and the construction of the new Capitol. He closes the interview by talking a little about some of the governors he served under.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Carl Hillmer Francis

  • SR 9437
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-02

This oral history interview with Carl Hillmer Francis was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Dayton, Oregon, on June 2, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Francis discusses his family background and early life in Woodburn, Oregon, including his early education and childhood activities. He then talks about studying law at Willamette University and Northwestern College of Law, practicing law in Dayton, and serving as Dayton's mayor from 1941 to 1942. He also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and Young Republicans.

Francis speaks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1943 to 1954, and in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1962. He describes some of his fellow legislators, working with lobbyists, and his decision to retire from the Legislature. He speaks about his interest in history and shares tales of some of his favorite historical figures. He closes the interview by talking about Dr. Lewis Alderman.

Francis, Carl Hillmer, 1915-1995

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28 - 1982-07-02

This oral history interview with Howard Hobson was conducted by Linda S. Dodds from June 28 to July 2, 1982, at Hobson's home in Portland, Oregon. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hobson discusses his early life in Portland, including his interest in athletics. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, particularly his involvement in college sports. He discusses studying at Columbia University in New York, New York, including his social life, playing local sports, and returning to Portland. He speaks at length about his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at the University of Oregon. He also briefly talks about his reasons for leaving Oregon to coach at Yale University, his work on the Olympic committee, and working for Ronald Press Publishing Company in New York. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the game of basketball, his writing projects, and awards he has received.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Oral history interview with Richard Sundeleaf, by Linda Dodds and Al Staehli

  • SR 9311
  • Collection
  • 1982-11-02 - 1982-11-23

Sundeleaf discusses family background and early life in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, his experiences studying architecture at the University of Oregon, and his career as an architect. He also discusses some of the buildings he designed, contemporary architects and his involvement in the Historic American Buildings Survey.

Sundeleaf, Richard, 1900-1987

Oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer

  • SR 70
  • Collection
  • 1982-12-06

This oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer was conducted by Terence O'Donnell on December 6, 1982. The interview was conducted as research for O'Donnell's book "An Arrow in the Earth: General Joel Palmer and the Indians of Oregon."

In this interview, Palmer discusses his ancestor Joel Palmer, who served as superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Oregon Territory from 1853 to 1856. He reads from family documents, letters, and newspaper articles regarding Joel Palmer's life and career and talks about treaties with Native Americans that Joel Palmer helped to negotiate. He discusses the Native American reservation system, and Joel Palmer's role in its formation. He talks about Palmer family history, particularly the overland journey of Joel Palmer to Oregon on the Barlow Road in 1847. He also briefly discusses his own early life in eastern Washington and southern Idaho.

Palmer, Omar C. (Omar Clyde), 1908-2003

Joel Palmer Papers, 1783-1982

  • Mss 114
  • Collection
  • 1783-1982

The papers consist of four groups of materials acquired by the Oregon Historical Society at various times. The first group, designated Mss 114, consists of correspondence (1848-1869) concerning the conduct of Indian affairs in Oregon, enlistment of a state militia, and efforts to establish a Union League Council. Correspondents include Benjamin Alvord, Jesse Applegate, Benjamin Bonneville, Samuel Culver, Addison C. Gibbs, and Joseph Lane. Also included is a diary (1857) kept by Palmer while on a voyage from Oregon City to Washington, D.C. via Panama; typescript copies of diaries (1854, 1856, 1860-1861) recording his travels throughout the Pacific Northwest; hand written copy of an agreement (1854) between the United States, represented by superintendent of Indian Affairs, Joel Palmer, and the Calipooia Indian tribe; and articles of incorporation (1862) of the Columbia River Railroad Company.

The second group of materials, designated Mss 114-1, consists of letters sent to Sarah Ann Palmer from various relatives, and receipts and other ephemera of Joel Palmer. Among these are hand written copies of poems dated 1783, possibly from one of Palmer's ancestors.

The third group within the collection, designated Mss 114-2, contains mostly biographical information about Palmer, along with letters written by his descendants and letters relating to the dedication of a statue of Palmer in 1971.

A fourth group of papers, designated Mss 114-3, consists of general correspondence, primarily political and military in nature, legal papers, and a survey of an unidentified Indian reservation.

The final group of materials, designated Mss 114-4, includes a manuscript poem, Bristol, England, 1784; letters from Palmer to General Joseph Lane and others; manuscript copy of report to the U.S. Secretary of War or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from General Joseph Lane, ca. 1849; a letter from W. B. Bonney to Joel Palmer, 1850 Jan. 17; letter to Joel Palmer from Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Bonneville, 1855 Mar. 27; printed copy of the treaty between the United States and the Rogue River Indians, 1855; manuscript extracts from "Articles of treatry made at Port Orford," 1857 Sept. 20; hand drawn map of the Columbia River and its tributaries, undated; and a pamphlet titled "History of the Grand Ronde Military Block House," 1911.

Palmer, Joel, 1810-1881

Oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon

  • SR 1
  • Collection
  • 1983-03-16

This oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon was conducted by Elizabeth Buehler at the Harmon home in Beavercreek, Oregon, on March 16, 1983. In this interview, the Harmons discuss their experience of graduating from Iowa State College, now Iowa State University, in the midst of the Depression with no job prospects in Iowa. Wendell H. Harmon describes choosing to leave Iowa for a homestead near Elk City, Oregon, in 1933. He talks about farming the land on the homestead, and Florence E. Harmon talks about their neighbors. She also talks about her experience being fired from her teaching job as a result of her marriage to Wendell H. Harmon. They discuss their experience setting up their homestead, including building and furnishing a house, preparing the land, and raising livestock. They talk about maintaining the homestead after Wendell H. Harmon accepted a forestry job in 1935 that involved work primarily outside Oregon, and about the process of acquiring the deed to the land. They close the interview by discussing tree farming, as well as the sale of their homestead.

Harmon, Wendell H. (Wendell Harold), 1910-1999

Pittock Mansion remembered

  • SR 9319
  • Collection
  • 1983-08-15 - 1984-03-26

A series of interviews conducted by Linda Brody regarding Pittock Mansions.

Tape 1: Marjorie Wright discusses her time living in the gatehouse of Pittock Mansion with her parents from 1920 to 1945, including the work her father did as head gardener.

Tape 2: Betty L. Meier discusses her childhood as a granddaughter of Henry L. Pittock and her memories of visiting Pittock Mansion.

Tape 3 and 4: Louise Barry discusses her relationship to the Pittock family and her memories of Pittock Mansion.

Tape 5: Robert "Peter" Gantenbein discusses the Pittock family and living in the Pittock Mansion. Eric Ladd is also present.

Tape 6: Allyn Staley discusses the restoration of the Pittock Mansion in the 1960s.

Tape 7: Alexander Bolton Pierce discusses the political process involved in the purchase of the Pittock Mansion by the City of Portland and its restoration in the 1960s.

Wright, Marjorie, 1920-2012

Oral history interview with Connie McCready

  • SR 9046
  • Collection
  • 1981-04-01 - 1984-06-17

This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Portland, Oregon, from April 1 to June 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Pendleton and Portland, Oregon. She focuses particularly on her father, Edgar Averill, and his career as a reporter for the East Oregonian and later as state game warden. She talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including working on the student newspaper, the Daily Emerald. She also discusses other newspapers she worked for after college, including the Coos Bay Times, now The World, and the Oregonian. She talks about meeting Albert McCready, a reporter for the Oregonian, and their subsequent marriage. She also describes some of her other colleagues at the Oregonian; the Oregonian strike of 1959 to 1965; and the merger of the Oregonian and Oregon Journal.

McCready discusses her entry into Portland politics as a result of her father's failing health. She talks about serving on the Citizens School Committee for Portland Public Schools, which was a body that sought to recruit candidates for the school board; serving as precinct committeewoman for the Oregon Republican Party; and her involvement with the League of Women Voters. She describes her successful 1966 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and some of the legislation she worked on during her single term in the Legislature, including on fish conservation, littering, and the creation of Tri-Met. She also talks about working with Representative Betty Roberts on legislation concerning fair employment practices and abortion. She discusses her experiences as one of only four women in the Legislature. She then discusses her appointment to the Portland City Council, and subsequent resignation from the Legislature, in 1970, as well as her re-election campaign later that year. She discusses working with Portland mayors Terry Schrunk and Neil Goldschmidt; her committee assignments; and her fellow city commissioners. McCready talks about serving as Portland mayor from 1979 to 1980, including her accomplishments, as well as her support for controversial issues such as fluoridation, women's rights and gay rights. She speaks at length about her unsuccessful re-election campaign in 1980. She closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of balancing political and personal life.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher, by Susan Gaughan

  • SR 1038
  • Collection
  • 1984-08-16

Luscher discusses his family background and dairy farming in Clackamas County, Oregon, and the changes in milking technology and the dairy business over the 20th century. Bill Tegart was also present.

Luscher, Rudolph

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce

  • SR 1571
  • Collection
  • 1984-09-07 - 1984-11-20

This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project.

Between the two sessions is an incomplete segment from a panel discussion regarding the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada. The discussion, held circa 1990, is moderated by Gordon Gulp, with an introductory speech by Charles F. Luce.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 1984, Luce discusses the Columbia River Treaty, including his own role as a negotiator, the terms of the treaty, and other members of the negotiating team. He talks about attempts to sell surplus power to California and Idaho, opposition to the Columbia River Treaty, and the long term benefits of the treaty. He closes the interview by talking about the early plans for Bonneville that he helped put together when he first began working at BPA in 1944.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Conversations with Waverley Country Club golf caddies

  • SR 89
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-07

These conversations with golf caddies at the Waverley Country Club in Portland, Oregon, were conducted by C. Edwin Francis on August 7, 1985, for his book "Waverley Country Club, 1896-1987." The caddies who were interviewed included Tony Roberts, Neil Peer, Charles Reimer, Bob McKendrick, Warren Munro, Greg Millett, and Iver Unis. In these conversations, they share stories about their experiences as golf caddies at Waverley Country Club.

Francis, C. Edwin

J.H. Horner Papers, 1889-1985

  • Mss 6031
  • Collection
  • 1889 - 1985

The collection consists principally of the typescript (with corrections in hand) of Horner's work, Wallowa River and Valley, dealing with regional history, as well as the Nez Percé Indians. Other papers include correspondence (ca. 1889-1985); legal documents (1898-1931); patents for window construction (1921-1922); and manuscript materials (undated). Horner's main correspondent is Otis Halfmoon, a Catholic Nez Percé who assisted with the author's manuscript. The collection also includes a list of other contributors that assisted Horner in his research

Horner, J. H., 1870-1953

Oral history interview with Constance Beaty

  • SR 4003
  • Collection
  • 1986-02-07 - 1986-02-07

This oral history interview with Constance Beaty was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, on February 7, 1986. In this interview, Beaty discusses her family background, her early life in Portland, and her childhood vacations in Seaview, Washington. She talks about the Golden West Hotel, which the first hotel in Portland to accommodate black people and was owned by her father, William Duncan Allen. She describes the interior furnishing of the hotel and talks about the clientele the hotel catered to. She discusses playing piano and organ; talks about her recreational and social activities as part of Portland's black community; and discusses her education in Portland. She closes the interview by talking about racial discrimination she experienced, and the impact her mother's death in 1924 had on her family.

Beaty, Constance (Nellie Constance), 1910-1996

Oral history interview with Stafford Hansell

  • SR 88
  • Collection
  • 1983 October 17 - 1986 June

This oral history interview with Stafford Hansell was conducted by Barbara Reynolds from October 17 to November 15, 1983, and in June 1986. In the interview, Hansell discusses his family history and early life on a farm in Umatilla County, Oregon, including having diphtheria and polio as a child and the long-term effects on his health. He also talks about his education at the University of Montana and Whitman College, including his involvement in athletics and drama. Hansell talks about the early years of his marriage to Mary Elizabeth Ennis; making ends meet during the Depression; farming with his father; hog farming with his brother, Bill; and adopting his son, John. He also discusses serving on his local school board from 1953 to 1957, including implementing kindergarten and increasing school funding. Hansell then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and representing Umatilla County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation on land-use planning, taxation, labor, reapportionment, education, agriculture, and marijuana. He also discusses his failed bid to become Speaker of the House in the 1967 session, as well as many of the representatives he served with. Hansell also discusses his role on the Ways and Means Committee; the Boeing Space Age Park and Boardman; salary increases for legislators; and the Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall administrations. He speaks briefly on his feelings regarding the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. He also talks about working for the administrations of Governors Bob Straub and Norma Paulus after leaving the Legislature, including serving on the Oregon Liquor Commission, the State Board of Education, and the Governor's Taskforce on Land Use Planning. He also discusses the Rajneeshees. Hansell closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family, as well as his involvement with the Oregon Historical Society and his interest in Native American cultures and art.

Hansell, Stafford (Marion Stafford), 1913-1995

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Russell Peyton

  • SR 473
  • Collection
  • 1987-07-28 - 1987-08-12

This interview with Russell Peyton was conducted by Dan Malone at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from July 28 to August 12, 1987. In the interview, Peyton discusses his family history and early life in Virginia. He also discusses his early jobs, including working as an assistant to a Chinese diplomat. He then talks about going to California and working in service stations, where he got involved in a lawsuit against the Shell Oil company. Peyton then discusses attending the University of Oklahoma and confronting his own racism. In talking about the lead-up to World War II, he discusses coming to Oregon and working for the Kaiser shipyards and his impressions of Portland. He then talks about a trip he took to Europe shortly after the end of the war. Peyton discusses his involvement with the Urban League and his work toward integration, particularly on housing discrimination. He also discusses the different forms that racism took in the North and South. He then talks about his work as an investigator for the Civil Rights Division of the Oregon State Bureau of Labor, detailing many of his cases. Peyton discusses his work with the Joint Council on Social Welfare and the legislation they lobbied for. He also discusses the achievements of the Oregon Prison Association; working with Portland General Electric to cease cutting off power to people who couldn't pay their bills in winter; and school busing. Peyton discusses his time as executive director of the Metropolitan Human Relations Commission, including affirmative action policies, working to improve the Portland police, food security, pay equality, and employment discrimination. He also discusses working with the Portland City Council and the Metro government. In addition, he talks briefly about Vietnam War protests in Portland. Peyton talks often about Edwin "Bill" C. Berry of the Urban League, as well as other leaders in Portland's black community. He then briefly describes each winner of the Russell Peyton Award from its inception to 1987. Peyton also talks about the numerous humanitarian organizations whose boards he served on after retirement. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments in civil rights.

Peyton, Russell A. (Russell Ackerman), 1903-1996

Oral history interview with Chester E. McCarty

  • SR 1222
  • Collection
  • 1985-11-12 - 1987-09-01

This interview with Chester E. McCarty was conducted by Bill Koen in Portland, Oregon, on November 12, 1985, and by Jim Strassmaier at McCarty's office in Portland from August 4 to September 1, 1987. In this interview, McCarty discusses his family background and early life in Stage Gulch and Portland, Oregon, including working on the family farm during summers, his memories of World War I, and his education in Portland. He talks about selling advertisement space for the Oregonian newspaper while attending the Northwestern College of Law, and about his marriage to Julia Caroline Gromoff. He speaks at length about serving in the National Guard, beginning at age 15, and in the U.S. Army field artillery branch.

He discusses serving as assistant attorney general of Oregon from 1930 to 1936, including representing the Game Commission and the state police. He also discusses working as a lawyer in private practice, where he focused on aviation law. He talks about being a commercial pilot on the side, and relates several anecdotes about emergency landings. He also discusses serving in the state Senate in 1942, including his friendship with Dorothy McCullough Lee, as well as resigning shortly after his election to serve in World War II.

He speaks at length about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps training pilots, and later commanding troops in the Middle East. He also talks about the activities of his wife, Julia Caroline Gromoff, during World War II. He then talks about returning to civilian life after the war and continuing his law practice in Portland, where he acted as defense counsel in numerous courts-martial. He talks about some of the judges he argued before, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee. He also discusses continuing to fly planes, as well as his service on the Port of Portland Commission. He discusses accepting the command of the Oregon Army Reserves, getting activated for the Korean War, and his continued service in the Air Force until his retirement in 1966. He closes the interview by discussing serving with Glenn Jackson in North Africa during World War II.

McCarty, Chester E. (Chester Earl), 1905-1999

Oral history interview with Harold L. Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

This oral history interview with Harold Pubols was conducted by his niece, Louise Pubols, from January 10-22, 1988. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 10, 1988, Pubols discusses his family background and talks about how his family came to the United States, as well as his parents' marriage. He talks about his early life on a farm in Hillsboro, Oregon, including his education, daily life, and leaving home. He discusses his brother, John R. Pubols, including John R. Pubols' experience in the U.S. Army, his education, and his career. He then talks about his own education and playing sports. He discusses attending Columbia University, now known as the University of Portland, and then Oregon State University on football scholarships. He also talks about dating Frances Audrey Jones.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 22, 1988, Pubols returns to the topic of his family background and early life on a farm in Hillsboro, including raising livestock and suffering abuse at the hands of his father.

Pubols, Harold L. (Harold Louis), 1903-1993

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