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Oral history interview with John C. Beatty

  • SR 3716
  • Collection
  • 1999-03

This oral history interview with John C. Beatty was conducted by two unidentified Riverdale High School students as part of series of interviews with Riverdale High School alumni in March 1999. In this interview, Beatty discusses his family background and early life and education at Riverdale High School in the Dunthorpe neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, in the 1920s and 1930s. He also briefly discusses his memories of the Depression and World War II, as well as the changes in the Dunthorpe neighborhood over the 20th century. He closes the interview by talking about his legal career and his experience being drafted during World War II.

Beatty, John Cabeen, 1919-

Oral history interview with Jeanne M. Radow, by Robert Watts

  • SR 9029
  • Collection
  • 1978-03-15

Radow discusses her involvement with Planned Parenthood, birth control, abortion, sex education, her early life in New York, serving in the Army Nurse Corps during World War II.

Radow, Jeanne M., 1921-2013

Oral history interview with Jean L. Lewis

  • SR 9064
  • Collection
  • 1981-03-05

This oral history interview with Jean L. Lewis was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Portland, Oregon, on March 5, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Lewis discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She briefly talks about studying at Northwestern College of Law, practicing law in Portland, and working on the staff of the U.S. Treasury General Counsel in Washington, D.C., during World War II.

She discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1954 to 1956, and in the Oregon Senate from 1957 to 1961. She talks about legislation she worked on, including on capital punishment, education, government transparency, and carnival safety. She also talks about her experiences as a woman in the Legislature, and as the first woman to serve on the Ways and Means Committee and the Emergency Board.

Lewis talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1961 to 1978. She describes her experiences as the first woman to serve on a circuit court in Oregon. She talks about specializing in domestic cases and about some of the cases she presided over, including cases on allowing single fathers to adopt children. She briefly lists some of the organizations she's been involved with. She closes the interview by talking about her reasons for retiring in 1978.

Lewis, Jean Lagerquist, 1914-1991

Oral history interview with Jean Black, by Karen Wingo

  • SR 9096
  • Collection
  • 1980-052-07

Black discusses his early life and education, studying in Rome, working in various research and academic libraries across the country, teaching library science, coming to Vanport, Oregon in 1946 to be a librarian at Vanport College, dealing with the aftermath of the 1948 flood, and the early history of the Portland State University library.

Black, Jean P.

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28

Hobson discusses his early interest in athletics, playing sports at University of Oregon, and his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at University of Oregon.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

  • SR 1249
  • Collection
  • 1981-03-19 - 1981-03-19

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Linda Dodds in Frye's chambers in Portland, Oregon, on March 19, 1981. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Klamath County, Oregon. She talks about the difficult experience of a huge change in her family situation as a child, when she was reunited with her mother and brother after having been raised entirely by her grandparents. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including influential professors, and meeting and marrying William Frye. She talks about raising a family and how postpartum depression drove her to start her teaching career. She also discusses her involvement in politics, including William Frye's political campaigns. She then talks about attending the University of Oregon law school in 1963, including other women in her class, balancing family life, and starting to practice law.

She describes becoming a judge for the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall and her later campaign. She talks about how her gender affected the way defendants perceived her. She also discusses how this new position affected her marriage and her divorce in 1975. She talks briefly about serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She closes the interview by discussing her current family life in 1981 and her plans for the future.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Harold Pubols, by Louise Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

Pubols discusses his family background, parents, siblings, Russian heritage, immigration to United States, early life working on a farm in Eastern Oregon, educational history etc.

Pubols, Harold

Oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk

  • SR 9467
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-18 - 1982-01-20

This oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Maryville Nursing Home in Beaverton, Oregon, from December 18, 1981, to January 20, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. Sister Peter Kump was also present for the entire interview, and Catherine Emmons Lusk was present for the interview session on January 20, 1982.

In this interview, Lusk discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from the East Coast in 1909 and his impressions of Oregon. He talks about practicing law in Portland and his marriage to Catherine Emmons. He discusses handling the case of the 1922 Oregon Compulsory School Bill and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court. He briefly speaks about serving as a judge on the Oregon Circuit Court and as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court, as well as serving in the U.S. Senate for a few months in 1960, including working with Senator Wayne Morse.

Lusk, Hall Stoner, 1883-1993

Oral history interview with Gladys Sims McCoy

  • SR 9045
  • Collection
  • 1981-02-20 - 1981-06-22

This oral history interview was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from February 20 to June 22, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, McCoy discusses her early life on a farm during the Depression in Chattanooga, Tennessee, including the impact that segregation had on her childhood, her education, and her early jobs. She then discusses attending Talladega University in Alabama, including the experience of having an international faculty and thereby an integrated community in the heart of the segregated South. She also talks about studying sociology. She describes seeking employment in the field of social work and accepting a job in Portland, Oregon, as assistant teenage program director at the YWCA. She discusses differences in the ways the black population was treated in Portland compared to her experiences in the South. She describes meeting Bill McCoy and their subsequent marriage, giving up her career to stay at home, and later pursuing a career again after raising seven children over the course of 17 years. She talks about attending Portland State University as an older student and the difficulty of finding child care. She then describes her work with Project Head Start in Vancouver, Washington; teaching sociology and counseling students at Clark College; and teaching sociology at Pacific University in Forest Grove.

McCoy discusses her involvement in local politics. She talks about serving on the board of Portland Public Schools, including her campaign and programs to improve schools. She speaks at length about the board's efforts to implement middle schools, and the opposition the idea faced. She talks about her involvement with Bob Straub's successful 1975 campaign for Oregon governor and serving as an ombudsman for the governor, as well as some of the cases she investigated. She talks about her 1978 campaign for Multnomah County commissioner. She describes some of her work as commissioner, the types of complaints she received, and her support for city-county consolidation. She closes the interview by discussing her philosophy of life.

McCoy, Gladys Sims, 1928-1993

Oral history interview with Floyd H. Hart, Jr.

  • SR 1176
  • Collection
  • circa 1969

This oral history interview with Floyd H. Hart, Jr. was conducted by Bob Reese circa 1969 at the Capitol studio in Salem, Oregon. In this interview, Hart discusses his efforts for property tax relief legislation. He also discusses the need for a sales tax to help fund public schools. He goes on to talk about pending legislation regarding air and water pollution.

After about 10 minutes of dead air, this tape also includes the swearing-in ceremony of Lee Johnson to the office of Oregon attorney general in 1969, including a short speech Johnson made to the Oregon Legislature.

Hart, Floyd H., Jr. (Floyd Henry), 1931-2014

Oral history interview with Emery Neale, by Jim Strassmaier

  • SR 339
  • Collection
  • 1988-02-10 - 1988-02-17

Neale discusses his family history and childhood, playing tennis at the Irvington Club, the history of indoor tennis in Portland, Oregon, discrimination at tennis clubs in the area, playing in tennis tournaments, his tennis career, being in the Army during WWII, and the People to People Tours.

Neale, Emery

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Potter, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9313
  • Collection
  • 1982-01-25

Potter discusses her education in art and architecture history at University of Oregon and Penn State, her involvement in the passage of the 1966 National Historic Preservation Act, and her work with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Register of Historic Places.

Potter, Elisabeth Walton, 1939-

Oral history interview with Edith Green

  • SR 9036
  • Collection
  • 1978-12-18

This oral history interview with Edith Green was conducted by Cynthia Harrison in Portland, Oregon, on December 18, 1978. In this interview, Green discusses her legislative record on women's rights, including the equal pay act of 1963, Title IX, and the Equal Rights Amendment. She speaks about the opposition such legislation faced and how public opinion regarding women's rights has changed over time. She also discusses serving on the Commission on the Status of Women and the report that commission produced. She talks about her impression of the respect for women held by presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. She discusses her efforts toward greater access to loans for higher education and the way that has helped foster the progress of women's rights. She closes the interview by discussing her effort to open the Job Corps program to women.

Green, Edith, 1910-1987

Oral history interview with Dr. Wilbert Todd, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9134
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-29

Dr. Todd discusses his early life and education in Wisconsin, his interest in science, funding research, and his career at the University of Oregon Medical School.

Todd, Wilbert R. (Wilbert Remington)

Oral history interview with Dr. Jessie Laird Brodie, by Roberta Watts

  • SR 9027
  • Collection
  • 1978-02-14 - 1978-03-30

Dr. Brodie discusses this history of laws regarding birth control, women's rights, practicing medicine, her involvement with the United Nations, Pan-American Women's Medical Association, Planned Parenthood, and other organizations, family planning in Latin America, particularly in Haiti, her involvement with the White House Council on Aging, Sickle-Cell Anemia, working in Cambodia, and her own family.

Brodie, Jessie Laird, 1898-1990

Oral history interview with Dorothy Thornton, by Nancy Hawver

  • SR 1076
  • Collection
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

Thornton discusses her family background, her father's involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association, her childhood and education, her art and art collecting, her husband, Robert Y. Thornton, a trip to Europe in the 1930s, the Depression, high school sports, Bob's political career, her involvement in the creation of the Tillamook County Library, raising a family, their activities during World War II, and her involvement in various art organizations.

Thornton, Dorothy, 1913-2005

Oral history interview with Donald McInnis, by Mary Gorsline

  • SR 1087
  • Collection
  • 1992-08-25 - 1992-11-10

McInnis discusses growing up in the Portland Metropolitan Area in the early part of the 20th century, his parents life moving around the Washington and Oregon States, and homesteading near Reedville, Oregon.

McInnis, Donald

Oral history interview with Don Clark

  • SR 1166
  • Collection
  • 1994 August 30 - 1998 March 27

Clark discusses family heritage, education, and career beginnings in the criminal justice system; experiences as Multnomah County sheriff; campaign for the Multnomah County Commission; modernization of county government in Oregon; Mt. Hood freeway and regional transportation planning, Burnside Consortium, Columbia Villa, single-payer health care, and numerous other subjects of policy and politics of city and county in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s.

Clark, Donald Edward, 1933-

Oral history interview with Constance Beatty, by Rick Harmon

  • SR 4003
  • Collection
  • 1986-02-07

Beatty discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon and Seaview, Washington, her father owning the Golden West Hotel, playing music, and race relations at school in Portland.

Beatty, Constance Allen

Oral history interview with Connie McCready

  • SR 9046
  • Collection
  • 1981-04-01 - 1984-06-17

This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Portland, Oregon, from April 1 to June 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Pendleton and Portland, Oregon. She focuses particularly on her father, Edgar Averill, and his career as a reporter for the East Oregonian and later as state game warden. She talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including working on the student newspaper, the Daily Emerald. She also discusses other newspapers she worked for after college, including the Coos Bay Times, now The World, and the Oregonian. She talks about meeting Albert McCready, a reporter for the Oregonian, and their subsequent marriage. She also describes some of her other colleagues at the Oregonian; the Oregonian strike of 1959 to 1965; and the merger of the Oregonian and Oregon Journal.

McCready discusses her entry into Portland politics as a result of her father's failing health. She talks about serving on the Citizens School Committee for Portland Public Schools, which was a body that sought to recruit candidates for the school board; serving as precinct committeewoman for the Oregon Republican Party; and her involvement with the League of Women Voters. She describes her successful 1966 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and some of the legislation she worked on during her single term in the Legislature, including on fish conservation, littering, and the creation of Tri-Met. She also talks about working with Representative Betty Roberts on legislation concerning fair employment practices and abortion. She discusses her experiences as one of only four women in the Legislature. She then discusses her appointment to the Portland City Council, and subsequent resignation from the Legislature, in 1970, as well as her re-election campaign later that year. She discusses working with Portland mayors Terry Schrunk and Neil Goldschmidt; her committee assignments; and her fellow city commissioners. McCready talks about serving as Portland mayor from 1979 to 1980, including her accomplishments, as well as her support for controversial issues such as fluoridation, women's rights and gay rights. She speaks at length about her unsuccessful re-election campaign in 1980. She closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of balancing political and personal life.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Claire Argow, by Roberta Watts

  • SR 9090
  • Collection
  • 1977-11-28 - 1977-12-02

Argow discusses her education and career in social work and criminology in New England, particularly Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut, and in Oregon. She also discusses prison conditions, capital punishment, advances in corrections in Oregon, her work with the Oregon Prison Association, teaching at Pacific University, her work with the Oregon Women’s Correctional Institution, women and crime, and moving to Oregon in 1945.

Argow, Claire

Oral history interview with Chester E. McCarty

  • SR 1222
  • Collection
  • 1985-11-12 - 1987-09-01

This interview with Chester E. McCarty was conducted by Bill Koen in Portland, Oregon, on November 12, 1985, and by Jim Strassmaier at McCarty's office in Portland from August 4 to September 1, 1987. In this interview, McCarty discusses his family background and early life in Stage Gulch and Portland, Oregon, including working on the family farm during summers, his memories of World War I, and his education in Portland. He talks about selling advertisement space for the Oregonian newspaper while attending the Northwestern College of Law, and about his marriage to Julia Caroline Gromoff. He speaks at length about serving in the National Guard, beginning at age 15, and in the U.S. Army field artillery branch.

He discusses serving as assistant attorney general of Oregon from 1930 to 1936, including representing the Game Commission and the state police. He also discusses working as a lawyer in private practice, where he focused on aviation law. He talks about being a commercial pilot on the side, and relates several anecdotes about emergency landings. He also discusses serving in the state Senate in 1942, including his friendship with Dorothy McCullough Lee, as well as resigning shortly after his election to serve in World War II.

He speaks at length about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps training pilots, and later commanding troops in the Middle East. He also talks about the activities of his wife, Julia Caroline Gromoff, during World War II. He then talks about returning to civilian life after the war and continuing his law practice in Portland, where he acted as defense counsel in numerous courts-martial. He talks about some of the judges he argued before, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee. He also discusses continuing to fly planes, as well as his service on the Port of Portland Commission. He discusses accepting the command of the Oregon Army Reserves, getting activated for the Korean War, and his continued service in the Air Force until his retirement in 1966. He closes the interview by discussing serving with Glenn Jackson in North Africa during World War II.

McCarty, Chester E. (Chester Earl), 1905-1999

Oral history interview with Cherie Hiser, by Jim Morris

  • SR 3125
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-06

Hiser discusses The Center of the Eye in Colorado, photographers she has worked with, photography techniques, portrait photography, her recent photography projects, including portraits of gay men and tattooed people, photography as therapy, studying photography with Minor White, and teaching photography.

Hiser, Cherie

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