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Hatfield, Mark O., 1922-2011
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Oral history interview with David S. Barrows

This oral history interview with David S. Barrows was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from January 31 to March 13, 2000. In this interview, Barrows discusses his family history and childhood in the San Francisco Bay Area of California and in Washington, D.C., as well as his high school education in California. He then talks about attending Willamette University, including having Mark Hatfield as a professor and mentor. Barrows discusses working as a page in the Oregon Legislature and his interest in a career as a lobbyist. He talks briefly about going to law school and practicing law. Barrows then talks about lobbying for the Fairview Home in the 1959 and 1961 legislative sessions, as well as his later lobbying work for tobacco wholesalers and the Oregon Savings and Loan League. His lobbying work included topics such sterilization, taxation, and financial regulations. He also talks about the history of Oregon and California Railroad Revested Lands and his lobbying for the Association of O & C Counties. He also speaks in great detail about legislative procedure, the rules regulating lobbyists, and the relationship between lobbyists and legislators. Barrows closes the interview with a discussion of his lobbying work on behalf of the Oregon Historical Society.

Barrows, David S. (David Stow), 1935-2014

Oral history interview with Douglas E. Coe

This oral history interview with Douglas E. Coe was conducted by Clark Hansen in Arlington, Virginia, on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Coe briefly discusses his family background and early life, focusing on his high school years in Salem, Oregon, and his memories of the Hatfield family. He talks about the evolution of his Christian faith, and how that led to his friendship with Mark Hatfield. He discusses how Hatfield's faith influenced his political career. He also talks about Hatfield's marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich; Hatfield's political role models; and Hatfield's relationships with other politicians. He closes the interview with a discussion of Hatfield's public and private lives.

Coe, Douglas E. (Douglas Evans), 1928-2017

Oral history interview with Frank C. Cook

This oral history interview with Frank C. Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Irish Inn in Ashland, Oregon, from November 29-30, 1989. Access to a portion of Tape 1, Side 1, is currently restricted.

In this interview, Cook discusses his family background and early life in Southern California, including his family's involvement with conservative Republican politics and his father's suicide. He discusses attending Occidental College in Los Angeles, California; his involvement with the Quaker movement and Buddhism; and the evolution of his political beliefs. He talks about serving in the National Guard from 1967 to 1968, during the Vietnam War.

Cook discusses working as an aide to U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1969 to 1973. He talks about Hatfield's political career, including Hatfield's role in coaching California Governor Ronald Reagan and how Hatfield's views on the Vietnam War affected his political career and his family. He talks about writing speeches for Hatfield, his work on anti-draft legislation, and other members of Hatfield's staff, particularly Gerry Frank. He also talks about other legislation he worked on for Hatfield, particularly the Neighborhood Government Act; Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign; and his work on Middle East issues. He closes the interview by discussing the possibilities for Hatfield's future career.

Cook, Frank C. (Franklin Charles), 1944-

Oral history interview with Freeman Holmer

This oral history interview with Freeman Holmer was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from May 17-24, 1988. In this interview, Holmer discusses his family background and early life in the Midwest. He then talks briefly about his college experience, his World War II service, and his early political beliefs. He discusses teaching political science at Willamette University from 1949 to 1959, including meeting fellow faculty member Mark Hatfield. He talks about Hatfield's friendship with Travis Cross, Hatfield's spirituality, and his own involvement with the Republican Party.

Holmer discusses Hatfield's campaign for Oregon secretary of state; talks about serving as director of elections from 1957 to 1959; and describes other members of Hatfield's staff. He then talks about Hatfield's campaign for Oregon governor; serving as director of the Department of Finance and Administration from 1959 to 1966; and Hatfield's staff. He also talks about Hatfield's marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich. He talks about Hatfield's agenda as governor, including government reorganization; Hatfield's emergency response to a flood in 1964; and Hatfield's relationship with other prominent Oregon politicians, including Tom McCall, as well as members of the business community. He discusses Hatfield's position on some controversial issues, particularly the Vietnam War. He then describes his own efforts toward Oregon's economic development; Hatfield's keynote address at the 1964 Republican National Convention; and attending governors' conferences.

Holmer then discusses his activities since leaving Hatfield's staff when Hatfield was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1966. He talks about serving as director of environmental protection for the state of Wisconsin from 1966 to 1968. He closes the interview by discussing his continued relationship with Hatfield.

Holmer, Freeman

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from May 25, 1988, to May 2, 1990. In this interview, Frank discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early education and the Meier & Frank department store, his family's business. He talks briefly about attending Stanford University, then discusses his Army service in Europe during World War II and his studies at Cambridge University in England. He talks about returning to Portland to work at Meier & Frank.

Frank speaks at length about Mark Hatfield's family background and early life. He talks about Hatfield's early political career, spirituality, and marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich. He talks about the 1965 sale of Meier & Frank, and his subsequent deeper involvement with Hatfield's political career. He discusses his economic planning work on the Governor's Advisory Committee, working with Glenn Jackson, and the Republican Party in Oregon. He talks about Hatfield's elections; Hatfield's brush with the vice presidential nomination in 1968; and Hatfield's working relationships with Oregon state legislators. He describes Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well of some of Hatfield's other controversial positions. He then talks about going to Washington, D.C., his duties as a member of Hatfield's staff, and other members of Hatfield's staff. He also talks about the conflict between Hatfield's liberal views and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He speaks at length about running Hatfield's office, including managing correspondence and staff, and contracting with the Herman Miller company for furniture. He discusses the ways in which Hatfield remains connected to his constituency; the areas in which he disagrees with Hatfield; and how they handled a real estate scandal during Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign. He discusses his personal activities, including writing an Oregon guidebook and his involvement with various organizations. He closes the interview by talking about how he first became acquainted with Mark Hatfield; Hatfield's political agenda; and issues contemporary to the interview session in 1990, including environmental concerns about logging and the proposed division of the Ninth Circuit Court.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy

This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy's office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield's feelings about President Richard Nixon's impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield's legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield's relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson

This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson's office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield's campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield's staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield's early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield's legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield's personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figures; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield's personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield's views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield's foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield's and his staff's reactions to Watergate; Hatfield's visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield's efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield's stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield's staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Janet L. Lamos

This oral history interview with Janet L. Lamos was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Lamos discusses her family background and early life in upstate New York. She briefly describes her work history, then talks about working as a typist for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield. She discusses her disagreement with Hatfield's stance on several issues, including the Vietnam War. Lamos describes her promotion to Hatfield's executive assistant in 1980 and the duties of that position, including managing Hatfield's schedule. She also describes some of the other members of Hatfield's staff, including Wes Michaelson and Gerry Frank, as well as how Hatfield interacted with his staff. She speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and work-life balance; the real estate scandal that plagued Hatfield in 1984; and Hatfield's family and personal life. She also discusses Hatfield's relationship with the evangelical voting bloc, the President Ronald Reagan administration, and President Richard Nixon.

Lamos, Janet L., 1949-

Oral history interview with Jenna L. Dorn

This oral history interview with Jenna L. Dorn was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Union Pacific Building in Washington, D.C., from June 13-15, 1988. In this interview, Dorn discusses her family background and early life in La Grande, Oregon. She discusses moving to New Haven, Connecticut, and her involvement in the women's movement. She talks about how she joined the staff of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1977; her work as a legislative assistant; and other members of Hatfield's staff, particularly Gerry Frank. She discusses legislation that she worked on for Hatfield, particularly regarding women's rights and the environment. She discusses how Hatfield communicated with his constituency, and Hatfield's efforts against budget cuts by the Reagan administration while he was serving on the Appropriations Committee. She talks about Hatfield's working relationship with U.S. Senator Bob Packwood and other members of the Oregon congressional delegation. She relates some anecdotes to demonstrate Hatfield's personality and spirituality. She also talks about leaving Hatfield's staff to work with Elizabeth Dole. She closes the interview by discussing the interpersonal relationships of Hatfield's staff.

Dorn, Jennifer Lynn, 1950-

Oral history interview with Jim Towey

This oral history interview with Jim Towey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on June 2, 1988. In this interview, Towey discusses his family background and early life in Jacksonville, Florida, including his Catholic upbringing. He talks about studying law at Florida State University, including working summer jobs and playing basketball. He then discusses his decision to forgo the practice of law and instead follow a spiritual calling to Washington, D.C. He describes how he came to be part of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff in 1982; his duties as a legislative assistant and later legislative director; and some of the other members of the senator's staff. Towey relates a few anecdotes regarding Hatfield's personality and spirituality. Using abortion legislation as an example, he describes the way the staff would engage with Hatfield on specific legislation and how the senator made decisions. He also describes working on improving conditions for refugees and the abuses he witnessed, as well as his feelings on President Ronald Reagan's agenda in general. Towey speaks at length about a real estate scandal during Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign and how they dealt with it. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's spiritual life.

Towey, Jim

Oral history interview with Loren D. Hicks

This oral history interview with Loren D. Hicks was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from April 18 to May 6, 1988. The audio recording of the interview sessions is out of order, with the end of the interview on the last half of Tape 7, Side 1.

In this interview, Hicks discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his early education. He talks about attending Willamette University for both his undergraduate and law degrees, including his social life, his Army service during World War II, and his marriage to Muriel Thomson. He discusses practicing law in Salem and running a farm.

Hicks describes the beginnings of his association with Mark Hatfield. He discusses what he knows about Hatfield's Navy service during World War II. He speaks about serving as assistant attorney general during Hatfield's tenure as Oregon secretary of state, including cases he handled and the occasional conflict of interest that arose. He also talks about Hatfield's 1960 campaign for Oregon governor. He then discusses serving as legal assistant to Hatfield during his governorship. He describes the other members of Hatfield's staff; the difference between his position as legal assistant and as assistant attorney general; and some of the legal issues he handled for Hatfield. He talks about Hatfield's rivalry with U.S. Attorney Robert Y. Thornton; negotiating with the Shell Oil Company; and Hatfield's relationships with Travis Cross and Gerry Frank. He speaks at length about a trip he took with Hatfield to South America, particularly describing Argentina and Brazil, as well as attending governors' conferences. He talks about extraditions, death penalty cases, and the Seaside riots of 1962. He also talks about an explosion in Roseburg, the Columbus Day Storm, and a flood in 1964. He discusses some minor political scandals, many of the appointments Hatfield made as governor, and the lease of property in Boardman to Boeing.

He closes the interview with a discussion of his appointment as a judge on the Circuit Court of Marion County, as well as his continued association with Mark Hatfield.

Hicks, Loren D. (Loren DeGuire), 1919-2014

Oral history interview with Marian J. Bruner

This oral history interview with Marian J. Bruner was conducted by Clark Hansen at Bruner's home in Bowie, Maryland, on June 18, 1988. In this interview, Bruner discusses her family background and early life in Iowa. She talks about her schooling and her interest in Christian education; working for the Reform Church in New York City; and how she got a job on the staff of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield. She talks about the other members of Hatfield's staff, and discusses some of her duties as caseworker early in Hatfield's senatorial career, including correspondence and some of the cases she handled. She then discusses Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War and the related cases she dealt with, including conscientious objectors. She then speaks about her promotion to executive assistant and the change in her duties, including making travel arrangements and managing Hatfield's schedule. Bruner discusses the types of engagements she arranged and Hatfield's work-life balance, as well as his hobbies and personal life. She also talks often about Hatfield's Christian faith and his political philosophy. She discusses Hatfield's relationship with his staff, his role in designing a few commemorative medals, and his committee assignments, particularly the appropriations committee. She closes the interview by discussing her decision to leave Hatfield's staff at the end of 1980.

Bruner, Marian J. (Marian Jeanette), 1915-2018

Oral history interview with Marty B. Gold

This oral history interview with Marty B. Gold was conducted by Clark Hansen at Gold's office in Washington, D.C., from June 13-16, 1988. In this interview, Gold discusses his family background and early life in New York City and Miami Beach, Florida, including his early political beliefs. He discusses attending American University in Washington, D.C., including his involvement in Republican politics. He talks about how he came to be aware of Mark Hatfield; Republican party politics in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly the 1968 presidential election; and Hatfield's stance on controversial issues such as abortion and the Vietnam War. He then briefly describes his service in Vietnam.

Gold discusses his work as a legal assistant to Hatfield from 1972 to 1979, while Hatfield was a U.S. senator. He talks about his duties, including applying for grants, sitting in on committee meetings, and legislation he was involved with. He also discusses other members of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's personality, and Hatfield's re-election campaigns. He talks about being named Outstanding Young Man in America in 1977, Hatfield's filibuster on legislation about the draft, and leaving Hatfield's staff to work for U.S. Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the U.S. Senate during his time there and his political philosophy.

Gold, Martin B., 1947-

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

This oral history interview with Monroe Mark Sweetland was conducted by Richard Harmon from November 16, 1984, to October 26, 1987, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In this interview, Sweetland discusses his family background and early life, including his childhood in rural Michigan; his early involvement in Democratic politics; and his experiences at Wittenberg University and Cornell University. He discusses his political activism during college, including his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy and his political activism on behalf of Socialist candidates. Sweetland also discusses his political activities after his return to Oregon in 1935, including his work with the Oregon Commonwealth Federation and his decision to leave the Socialist Party and join the Democratic Party. Also discussed is his work with labor unions; the New Deal programs; and his work with the Oregon Democratic Party. He briefly talks about World War II and its effect on Oregon politics, particularly the effect the Hitler-Stalin pact had on American communists and the Oregon Commonwealth Federation; internment of Japanese-Americans; and his own pacifism. Sweetland goes on to talk about his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon after the war as national committeeman; the factions within the party; and mobilizing women and black voters. He also discusses his ownership of several Oregon newspapers (the Molalla Pioneer, the Newport News, and the Milwaukie Review) and about running them with the help of his wife, Lillie Sweetland. In addition, he describes his experiences as a legislator in the Oregon House of Representatives and Senate during the 1950s and early 1960s. Topics include: education; attempts to pass a sales tax; campaign finance; and Wayne Morse's switch to the Democratic Party. He also discusses working closely with Howard Morgan, the national chairman of the Democratic Party; U.S. Senator Dick Neuberger; and U.S. Representative Edith Green. Sweetland talks about his relationship with Mark Hatfield and running for secretary of state against him in 1956; the 1962 presidential election and his support of John F. Kennedy; and his campaign for secretary of state in 1964. Finally, he discusses his activities after leaving the Legislature, including his interest in Indonesia and continued advocacy for education as a lobbyist for the National Education Association.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Otto Skopil

This oral history interview with Otto Skopil was conducted by Rick Harmon and Jim Strassmaier in Skopil's chambers at the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from August 19, 1985, to November 27, 1989. The audio for this interview is incomplete; Tape 26 was discovered to be blank in 2020, but its contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript and in an index.

In the interview, Skopil discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his time at Salem High School and the effect of the Depression and the New Deal on the Salem area. Skopil talks about attending Willamette University in great detail. He discusses his World War II experience in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, between earning his bachelor's degree in economics and returning to Willamette earn his bachelor of laws. Skopil describes practicing law in Salem for 26 years, from 1946 to 1972, including partnering with his uncle, Ralph Skopil, and later with Bruce Williams. He discusses some of the cases he argued, particularly his only U.S. Supreme Court case, which involved State Farm Insurance. He then briefly discusses his personal life, including his two marriages, first to June Johnson, then to Jan Lundy, and his involvement in various religious and civic organizations, including the Board of Governors for the Oregon Bar. He also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his opposition to both the Korean and Vietnam wars, as well as how the draft affected his son, Ric Skopil. He talks about serving as a judge for the U.S. Circuit Court of Oregon, including his confirmation; the procedures of the court; sentencing; and the development of the magistrate system. He also discusses some of the cases he presided over on topics including the environment, white-collar crime, and securities. He talks at length about the case of Chuck Armsbury. He also discusses working with his fellow judges, particularly Gus Solomon and Robert Belloni, as well as his relationships with Mark Hatfield and Griffin Bell. Skopil then describes his time as a judge for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, including the relationship between that court and Congress; the increase of litigation during the 1980s; and the public perception of the court. He discusses some of the cases that came before the court on topics including mental health, capital punishment, timber, and drugs. He also talks about some of his fellow judges, particularly Ted Goodwin and James Browning. Skopil closes the interview by describing the importance of law clerks; discussing sentencing guidelines; and talking about his family life.

Skopil, Otto R. (Otto Richard), 1919-

Oral history interview with Richard H. Jones

This oral history interview with Richard H. Jones was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from December 11, 1987, to January 13, 1988. In this interview, Jones discusses his family background and early life in Colorado, including his early education. He then discusses his memories of the Depression and coming to the West Coast to accept a teaching job at Stanford University in 1938. He then talks about teaching history at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and becoming acquainted with Mark Hatfield and Gerry Frank. He discusses his involvement in Hatfield's 1958 campaign for Oregon governor. He discusses appointments Hatfield made as governor, and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He also talks about the differences and similarities between Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall. He describes Hatfield's accomplishments as governor, including on education; Hatfield's relationship with the state Legislature; and the attempt to revise the Oregon constitution in the early 1960s. He discusses Hatfield's involvement with national Republican politics in the 1960s, particularly his involvement in the Goldwater and Nixon presidential campaigns. He also talks about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and how his own views aligned with Hatfield's; his involvement with Hatfield's senatorial campaigns; and Hatfield's relationship with U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's support for the National Rifle Association.

Jones, Richard H. (Richard Hutton), 1914-1998

Oral history interview with Rick Rolf

This oral history interview with Rick Rolf was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Washington, D.C., and at the Benson Hotel in Portland, Oregon, from June 3 to September 24, 1988. In this interview, Rolf very briefly discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about how he first came into contact with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1972 and how he got involved in politics as a result of the war in Vietnam. He discusses working for Hatfield as an intern after college and working toward an embargo on Ugandan coffee. He talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Gerry Frank. Rolf discusses how Hatfield interacted with other senators; Hatfield's opinion of the Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan administrations; and Hatfield's work as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rolf speaks at length about Hatfield's opposition to much of the Reagan administration's agenda, both foreign and domestic. He discusses his foreign policy work of the 1980s, including two trips he took to El Salvador, the peace process in Nicaragua, and observing elections in Guatemala. He also discusses the geopolitics of the Middle East. He talks about Hatfield's feelings on the War Powers Act; Hatfield's filibuster against Selective Service; and Hatfield's opposition to nuclear weapons and nerve gas. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's real estate scandal and how it was resolved.

Rolf, Rick (S. Richard), 1955-

Oral history interview with Riki P. Sheehan

This oral history interview with Riki P. Sheehan was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from June 2-11, 1988. In this interview, Sheehan discusses coming to Washington, D.C., after graduating from Cornell University in 1973. She describes the atmosphere of the city during the Watergate scandal and beginning to work with U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield, particularly her job interview. She discusses the issues on which she disagreed with Hatfield, including on U.S.-Israeli relations and abortion. She describes her duties as a legislative assistant and working with other members of Hatfield's staff. She discusses Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as how Hatfield's position on many issues differed from that of other Republicans. She talks about cases she worked on when she first joined Hatfield's staff and describes how Hatfield would take a personal interest in some of them. Sheehan discusses Hatfield's relationship with other senators, including John Stennis, as well as Hatfield's personal and family life. She speaks at length about Hatfield's chairmanship of the Senate Appropriations Committee and her work on that committee's staff. She also describes Hatfield's relationship with the administrations of presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. Sheehan discusses Hatfield's interest in and support for Oregon Health Sciences University (now Oregon Health & Science University), as well as funding for AIDS research. She closes the interview by discussing a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984, Hatfield's family life, and his legacy.

Sheehan, Riki P. (Fredrica Poster), 1951-

Oral history interview with Sam H. Mallicoat

This oral history interview with Sam H. Mallicoat was conducted by Clark Hansen at Mallicoat's home in Tigard, Oregon, from May 23-27, 1988. In this interview, Mallicoat discusses his family background and early life in rural Oregon. He talks about his early career as an educator in Oregon, his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, and starting a family. He then talks about meeting Mark Hatfield while in law school and about returning to the U.S. Navy in order to teach at the naval training center in Portland, Oregon, in 1948. He talks about beginning to work in Oregon politics after leaving the Navy in 1955 to become a lobbyist for the Oregon Railroad Association. He also discusses Mark Hatfield's political career during this time. He then discusses serving as the director of planning and development for the state of Oregon from 1961 to 1967, while Hatfield was governor of Oregon. He focuses particularly on his interactions with Hatfield's staff, and on working with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse to bring Boeing to Boardman, Oregon. He also talks about Hatfield's relationship to his constituents and industries while governor, as well as Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War.

Mallicoat talks about Hatfield's election to the U.S. Senate in 1966 and how he subsequently became Hatfield's chief of staff. He talks about the other members of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's committee assignments, and his continued opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield's role in the 1968 Republican convention, as well as Hatfield's relationship to the Republican Party, particularly with Tom McCall. He also discusses hate mail and death threats that Hatfield received, legislation Hatfield was involved with, and Hatfield's relationship with other senators. He talks about Hatfield's financial situation; leaving Hatfield's staff in 1973 to return to Oregon; and the changes made in Hatfield's staff by his successor, Gerry Frank. He closes the interview by talking about fundraising, Hatfield's closest advisors, particularly Frank, and his own continued relationship with Hatfield.

Mallicoat, S. H., 1915-2010

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Travis Cross

This oral history interview with Travis Cross was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Cross' office at St. Vincent's Hospital and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 8 to November 23, 1987. In this interview, Cross discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including growing up in the same neighborhood as Mark Hatfield. He then talks about attending Willamette University at the same time as Hatfield, and how they became more closely acquainted. He talks about Hatfield's early life, military service during World War II, and college experiences at Stanford University and Willamette University. He talks about Hatfield's admiration for Herbert Hoover and Dwight D. Eisenhower; and about working at Willamette University at the same time as Hatfield.

Cross then discusses acting as an aide throughout Hatfield's Oregon political career, from 1957 to 1967. He discusses Hatfield as Oregon secretary of state, including helping with campaigns, and the make-up of Hatfield's staff. He describes the duties of the secretary of state, including running the elections division and serving on the board of control; some of their accomplishments during that time; and working with Governor Bob Holmes.

Cross talks about Hatfield as Oregon governor from 1959 to 1967. He discusses the appointment of Howard Appling as secretary of state, Hatfield's relationship with the Oregon Republican Party, and Hatfield's attempts to reorganize state government. He discusses working with the Oregon Legislature, appointments Hatfield made, and dealing with the press. Cross talks about Hatfield's political opponents, including Howard Morgan and Robert Y. Thornton. He also discusses Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and his support for Barry Goldwater during the 1964 Republican presidential primary. He talks about Hatfield's 1966 campaign for the U.S. Senate, and his decision to leave Hatfield's staff. He discusses Hatfield's Washington, D.C., staff, including Gerry Frank. He also describes Glenn Jackson and Monte Montgomery. Cross closes the interview by discussing his activities after leaving Hatfield's staff and their continued friendship.

Cross, Travis (William Travis), 1927-2004

Oral history interview with Vern Cook

This oral history interview with Robert Vernon "Vern" Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at Cook's law office in Gresham, Oregon, and Cook's home in Troutdale, Oregon, from December 15, 1994, to October 15, 1995. In the interview, Cook discusses his family background and early life during the Depression in Las Animas, Colorado, and in Gresham. He also describes being a young man during World War II; being denied enlistment in the Navy due to polio; and his rehabilitation from polio. Cook discusses studying political science at Reed College and law at the University of Oregon, all while working concessions at various businesses in California with his brother. He talks about practicing law in Gresham; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and his first campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1956. Cook discusses the legislation he worked on while serving in the House, including taxation, education, and worker's compensation. He also talks about serving on the judicial committee and related issues. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with, including Pat Dooley and Monroe Sweetland, as well as Governor Mark Hatfield.

Cook then describes his experience in the Oregon Senate, including serving on the judiciary committee and legislation on taxation, particularly sales taxes, as well as health insurance, education, land use, agriculture, domestic violence, and labor. He also talks about working with senators Tom Mahoney, Edith Green, Walter Pearson, Debbs Potts, Monte Montgomery, Alice Corbett, Ted Hallock, Jason Boe, and Vic Atiyeh. Cook also discusses party politics and its influence on the effectiveness of the Legislature during his tenure; the 1968 Democratic National Convention; and working with Governor Tom McCall and Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt. He also talks about his unsuccessful campaigns for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate; his involvement in Frank Church's campaign in the Democratic presidential primary in 1976; and the financial difficulties he faced as a legislator. He closes the interview by discussing his career as a lawyer since leaving the Legislature in 1980.

Cook, Vern (Robert Vernon), 1925-2008

Oral history interview with Wallace P. Carson, Jr.

This oral history interview with Wallace P. Carson, Jr. was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Oregon Supreme Court in Salem from June 12 to October 24, 1996. In the interview, Carson discusses his early life and childhood in Salem, including his memories of World War II. He also discusses his education, from elementary school to attending Stanford University and Willamette University Law School. He also discusses meeting his wife, Gloria Stolk, and his involvement with the Republican Party. Carson describes his 34-year military career in the Air Force and the Oregon National Guard, as both a pilot and a lawyer. He also talks about practicing law in Salem.

Carson then talks about his political career, beginning with his election to the Oregon House of Representatives in 1966. He discusses legislation on topics including taxes, particularly a sales tax; land use; education; and women's rights. Carson describes his time in the Oregon Senate, from 1970 to 1977, including his campaign, the Vietnam War, taxes, his relationship with the media, the criminal code, labor, utilities, and health care. He also discusses working with Oregon legislators and governors, including Tony Yturri, Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, Senate Secretary Cecil Edwards, Vic Atiyeh, Bob Straub, and Jason Boe.

Carson then discusses his experience on the Marion County Circuit Court from 1977 to 1982, including cases on medical malpractice. Carson next turns to his service on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1982 to 2006. He discusses cases he presided over on topics including capital punishment, mental illness, privacy, search and seizure, and elections. He also discusses the role of the chief justice, court procedure, and his interactions with attorneys. Carson discusses his fellow justices, including Betty Roberts, Jacob Tanzer, Arno Denecke, Hans Linde, and Mitch Gillette. He also discusses the history of penal systems, his re-election campaigns, and his home life.

Carson, Wallace P., Jr., 1934-

Oral history interview with Walter H. Evans, III

This oral history interview with Walter H. Evans, III, was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Washington, D.C., from June 6-9, 1988. The audio is incomplete; Tape 3 was discovered to be blank in 2020. That portion of the interview is reflected in an incomplete transcript.

In this interview, Evans discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early political beliefs. He speaks briefly about attending the University of Oregon and the Willamette University College of Law, then talks about working as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice William Perry, as well as his role in the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also talks about his friendship with Gerry Frank and becoming part of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff. He describes his duties as a legislative aide, then a press aide, and as legal counsel to Hatfield. He talks about other members of Hatfield's staff; Hatfield's relationship with other senators; and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War. He discusses legislation that Hatfield worked on, Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign, and Hatfield's relationship with Oregon Governor Tom McCall and U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. He discusses appointments to federal offices in Oregon made during Hatfield's tenure and talks about communicating with the press. He also speaks further about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and talks about Hatfield's handling of the Watergate scandal. Evans closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's home and family life.

Evans, Walter H., III (Walter Howard), 1941-2017

Oral history interview with Warne H. Nunn

This oral history interview with Warne H. Nunn was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 20 to November 3, 1987. In this interview, Nunn discusses his family background and early life on a farm outside Salem, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending Willamette University, including his professors. He talks about his career in civil service for the state of Oregon, beginning with a job at the Civil Service Commission in 1945, on the Public Utilities Commission in 1952, and as director of the Department of Motor Vehicles in 1956. He speaks about working with Mark Hatfield as assistant secretary of state from 1957 to 1959, and describes the make-up of Hatfield's staff, including Travis Cross. He also talks about Hatfield's relationship with the Oregon Republican Party; Hatfield's campaigns for Oregon governor; and his own friendship with Hatfield.

Nunn discusses serving as chief of staff for Hatfield from 1959 to 1967, including Hatfield's efforts to reorganize the state government, and Hatfield's working relationship with the Legislature, as well as with lobbyists. He also describes Hatfield's views on the Vietnam War; efforts toward Oregon's economic development; and the 1968 Republican Convention when Hatfield was being considered as Richard Nixon's running mate. He also discusses Hatfield's involvement with Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential campaign. Nunn then discusses serving as chief of staff for Hatfield for three months in 1967 after Hatfield was elected as a U.S. senator. He talks about setting up an office in Washington, D.C., and some of the people who made up Hatfield's new staff, including Sam Mallicoat and Gerry Frank. He closes the interview by discussing his departure from Hatfield's staff and his return to Oregon.

Nunn, Warne H. (Warne Henry), 1920-2007

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt

This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Clark Hansen from May 17-19, 1988. In this interview, Wyatt briefly discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon, particularly the development of his political beliefs. He talks about his early career, including working as a special agent for the FBI, serving in the Marines during World War II, and practicing law in Astoria, Oregon. He then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his legislative career. He shares his memories of Mark Hatfield, including Hatfield's relationship with Oregon's political parties, Hatfield's primary political opponents, and Hatfield's involvement with the 1964 Barry Goldwater presidential campaign.

Wyatt then discusses serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, including his campaigns. He talks about working with Hatfield, then governor of Oregon, on Oregon-focused legislation, as well as working with Hatfield's staff. He also talks about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War and his 1966 campaign for U.S. Senate. Wyatt also describes U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. He goes on to speak further about Hatfield, including his staff in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield's pacifism and political alignment. He speaks at length about the 1968 Republican Convention when Hatfield was being considered as Richard Nixon's running mate, as well as Hatfield's continued opposition to the Vietnam War and legislation he worked on related to it. Wyatt talks about the Oregon Republican Party's structure, Walter Huss as its chair, and the party's increasing conservatism. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's effectiveness as a U.S. senator, as well as Wyatt's social relationship with Hatfield.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009