Showing 466 results

Collections
Print preview View:

Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series

  • SR Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series
  • Collection
  • 1981?

A series of lectures given by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on the importance of preserving the Columbia River Gorge.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-1986

Conversations with Waverley Country Club golf caddies

  • SR 89
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-07

These conversations with golf caddies at the Waverley Country Club in Portland, Oregon, were conducted by C. Edwin Francis on August 7, 1985, for his book "Waverley Country Club, 1896-1987." The caddies who were interviewed included Tony Roberts, Neil Peer, Charles Reimer, Bob McKendrick, Warren Munro, Greg Millett, and Iver Unis. In these conversations, they share stories about their experiences as golf caddies at Waverley Country Club.

Francis, C. Edwin

Drive-in Restaurants of Portland Oral History Project

  • SR Drive-ins
  • Collection
  • 1980-09-10 - 1980-11-21

A series of oral history interviews conducted by Curtis Johnson about the history of Drive-in restaurants in Portland, Oregon with a particular emphasis on Tik-Tok and Yaw's Top Notch.

Johnson, Curtis

Fred Meyer Oral History Project

  • SR FM
  • Collection
  • 1970-1990 (bulk 1988-1990)

The Fred Meyer Oral History Series discusses the business operations and the man behind the Fred Meyer stores, one of the first self-service grocery stores in the nation. They were innovators in the concept of one-stop shopping, paving the way for the modern superstore.

Academy of Science of St. Louis

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Collection
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

Interview with Aaron Brown

This interview with Aaron Brown was conducted by an unidentified woman around 1975 for Grassroot News Northwest. In the interview, Brown discusses his early college education and career as a teacher and railroad worker. He then discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, and attending Northwestern College of Law while working as a caseworker for the Oregon Welfare Department. He talks about being appointed as a judge to the Portland Municipal Court in 1969 and to the U.S. District Court of Oregon in 1971, as well as his re-election campaign in 1972. Brown talks about his experience as a black man in the legal profession, including his relationship with the press. He goes on to speak about the black experience in America and how it related to his decision to become a lawyer. He describes his belief in the judicial system, his reasoning behind some his judgements, and his thoughts on why black people are a disproportionate part of the number of people in prison. He closes the interview by discussing his views on drug use among young black people of the 1970s.

Brown, Aaron, Jr., 1926-2016

Interview with Eva Rickles

This interview with Eva Rickles was conducted by Paul Fardig and Judith Fardig in 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. This interview was conducted informally during a photo shoot. In this interview, Rickles discusses her childhood dog, Wippi, whom she had to leave behind when her family fled Nazi Germany in 1937. She also talks about some of the items her family brought with them to the United States, particularly family photographs and a grandfather clock. She speaks about the family background of her husband, Norman H. Rickles; the Enlightenment as it applied to the European Jewish community (known as Haskalah); and several of the artworks in her home. She and the interviewers make small talk away from the recording device for several minutes. Rickles closes the interview by reading from her father's diary; discussing her early education at a synagogue in Berlin, Germany; and describing the differences in English dialects. She and the interviewers make small talk for the remainder of the audio recording.

Rickles, Eva S. (Eva Simons), 1927-

Interview with Thomas H. Mercer

  • SR 3974
  • Collection
  • 1976

This interview with Thomas Mercer was conducted circa 1976. In the interview, Mercer, who was running against Al Ullman, discusses his current campaign for a seat in the Oregon House of Representatives. He also discusses his heart issues and how they have affected his career; gun control; and health care. In addition to the interview, there is a recording of a question-and-answer session with Mercer and voters during his campaign. In the session, Mercer addresses questions regarding abortion and taxation.

Also on the audiocassettes with the Mercer interview is a speech delivered by an unidentified man circa 1977, regarding his experience in the Oregon Legislature, and a discussion held in Salem, Oregon, also circa 1977. The speakers in the discussion include Robert Marx, Anthony Meeker, Margaret Dereli, Mae Yih, Bill Rutherford, Wally Carson, Ken Jernstedt, Tony Van Vliet, and other unidentified legislators. Topics include municipal-, county-, and state-level taxation; revenue sharing; correctional institutions; SB 100 and land use planning; and energy conservation. It is unknown what, if any, relationship these recordings have to the Mercer interview.

Mercer, Thomas H.

Interviews with Wayne Morse campaign staff

These audio recordings consist of interviews with staffers of Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign for the U.S. Senate. The interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman. The interviewees include Ron Abell, Helen Johnson, and Phillip George. In these interviews, the staffers discuss Morse's accomplishments and the reasons why they believe he should be re-elected, including his senior position in the Senate, his stance on war and social issues, and his political acumen. They talk about Morse's plans to pursue legislation on health care, jobs, and poverty.

The recordings also include variations of political ads for Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign, produced by Oregon legislator Ted Hallock's advertising and public relations company.

Abell, Ron, 1932-

Japanese American Oral History Project

  • Japanese American Oral History Project
  • Collection
  • 1992-1998

A series of oral history interviews conducted between 1992 and 1998 with Japanese Americans in Oregon. Loen Dozono of the Japanese American Citizen's League (JACL) collaborated with OHS on this project. The interviews were conducted by JACL and OHS staff and volunteers. They aimed to interview Issei (first generation Japanese Americans), and ultimately also interviewed several Nisei (second generation Japanese Americans).

KPTV interview with Jackie Kennedy and John F. Kennedy

  • SR 3904
  • Collection
  • 1958

This interview with John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy was conducted by John A. Salisbury for broadcast on the Portland, Oregon, channel KPTV in 1958. In this interview, Jackie Kennedy discusses their family life and recreational activities. John F. Kennedy talks about Jimmy Hoffa and labor unions. He addresses the controversy surrounding his Catholicism and youth. He discusses his experience meeting Oregonians.

Salisbury closes the interview with thanks to the Kennedys for appearing on his program, a commercial for Ovaltine, and an explanation of the changes in Oregon laws regarding primaries. A commercial for SafeCo Insurance plays, followed by a message regarding Oregon election laws from Oregon Secretary of State Howell Appling and Governor Mark Hatfield. The recording ends with a commercial for an allergy nasal spray.

Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963

Oral history interview with Abel F. Getachew

This oral history interview with Abel F. Getachew was conducted by Sankar Raman and Gina Ruggeri on June 11, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Getachew discusses his family background and early life in Ethiopia, including his education, social life, and playing soccer. He talks about his mother's disappearance in 2007; learning later that she had immigrated to the United States; and his life in Ethiopia until he was able to join her in 2012. He describes the process of immigrating to the U.S. and adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his education in Portland, including learning English as a second language, playing soccer, and participating in various academic extracurricular activities. He also talks about his experience at Roosevelt High School and transferring to De La Salle North Catholic High School. He discusses his plans to pursue a career in the medical field and interning at Oregon Health & Science University. He talks about applying for colleges and scholarships. He speaks at length about creating an organization, Hope for Bright Future, to support other immigrant students. He closes the interview by discussing his plan to attend Georgetown University, then medical school, and to become a cardiovascular surgeon.

Getachew, Abel F., 2000-

Oral history interview with Abood Aldabea

This oral history interview with Abood Aldabea was conducted by Sankar Raman on May 18, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Aldabea's family was present, and they occasionally contributed in Arabic. An unidentified neighbor was also present.

In this interview, Aldabea discusses his early life in Damascus, Syria, including his education, family, and neighborhood. He also describes some of his favorite Syrian foods. He shares his memories of the civil war in Syria, including being gassed by the Syrian military while heading home from his mosque and bombings in his neighborhood. He talks about fleeing to Jordan, and about life in Jordan as a Syrian refugee. He describes the process of being resettled in the United States in 2014. The unidentified neighbor talks about helping Aldabea's family get established in Portland, Oregon. Aldabea talks about adjusting to life in Portland, his education, and his involvement in sports. He closes the interview by discussing learning English as a second language, his friends, and his plans for the future.

Aldabea, Abood (Abdulelah), 2002-

Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus

  • SR 9407
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-03

This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Al Monner

  • SR 1068
  • Collection
  • 1993-02-25 - 1993-03-04

This oral history interview with Al Monner was conducted by Donald J. Sterling at Monner's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to March 4, 1993. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1993, Monner discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Kaskela, Oregon, including his education, his sister, and his recreational activities. He then talks about moving to Portland in 1923, his high school education, and his early interest in photography. He speaks about working for a public library, attending Linfield College, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He discusses working for Photo Art Studio, his friendship with Ray Atkeson, and his involvement with the Wy'east Climbers.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1993, Monner revisits the topics of his family background, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He speaks about his early career as a photographer for the Oregonian newspaper and describes his photography equipment. He then discusses his career as a photographer for the Oregon Journal newspaper, his photography equipment, and some of his assignments. He also talks about his freelance work, as well as photography he did for himself; photographers he worked with, including Minor White; and his involvement with the Mazamas and mountain climbing. He speaks about his marriage to Catherine Elizabeth Gnadinger, and about his children, their careers, and their families. He speaks at length about photographing Portland's Romani community and Native Americans. He then talks about Catherine Elizabeth Monner's death in 1961 and his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing famous people and events that he photographed.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Oral history interview with Alan Green

  • SR 2824
  • Collection
  • 1999-04-20 - 1999-07-21

This oral history interview with Alan Green was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Green's office and home in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to July 21, 1999. Tape 16 of the recording is missing, but the contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript of the interview.

In this interview, Green discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of the Depression, his family history of alcoholism, and his early education, including his involvement in student body government during high school. He then discusses his experiences as a theodylite observer in the Army during World War II, including spending time in an Army hospital after a truck accident in New Guinea. He talks about attending Stanford University, including living in the Phi Delta fraternity house, and meeting his wife, Joan Irwin. He describes working an insurance salesman, his marriage, and starting a battery company. He also briefly discusses serving as president of the University Club in 1967 and his efforts to open membership to Jewish people. He talks about a DUI infraction in 1962, his struggle with alcoholism, and his path to sobriety, as well as his later work helping others get sober. He speaks at length about his management of various business enterprises.

Green discusses his involvement in moderate conservative politics and the Republican Party. He talks about his chairmanship of the Multnomah County Central Committee, the 1964 presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater, and Mark Hatfield's brush with the vice presidency in 1968. He also talks about Wayne Morse's defection to the Democratic Party. He speaks at length about his service on the Port of Portland, including competition with Seattle, labor issues, and other members of the commission, particularly Ed Westerdahl. He shares his memories of the Richard Nixon administration, particularly his feelings regarding the Watergate scandal and the rise of the far right. He also talks about serving on the Federal Maritime Commission from 1982 to 1988, including the confirmation process, the Shipping Act of 1985, and his social life while living in Washington, D.C. He talks about how his work on that commission was facilitated by both Mark Hatfield and Bob Packwood. Green then describes serving as chairman for George H.W. Bush's 1988 presidential campaign in Oregon and his subsequent appointment as ambassador to Romania in 1989.

Green speaks at length about serving as ambassador to Romania from 1989 to 1992. He talks about his confirmation, his training, and the fall of Nicolae Ceaușescu. He talks about the members of his staff, living behind the Iron Curtain, and helping Romanian political dissidents become American citizens. He then talks about the new Romanian president, Ion Iliescu, Romanian political parties, and Romanian society and economy after the revolution. He also talks about traveling through Europe while an ambassador, Romania's role in the Gulf War, and international adoption of Romanian children. He then discusses his activities during retirement, including sitting on various boards, and his involvement with the political campaigns of Gordon Smith and George W. Bush. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren.

Green, Alan, 1925-

Oral history interview with Alejandro Vilches

This an oral history interview with Alejandro Vilches was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 3, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vilches discusses his family background and early life in Bryan, Texas, including his father's education there. He then discusses his life in Honduras from ages 4 to 28, including being bilingual, his education, and his siblings. He also talks about his father's career as a pilot and death in an airplane accident, as well as his mother raising their family as a single parent. He describes the Honduran people and culture. He discusses studying computer science at the Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and the pressure he felt to succeed as the oldest child. He also talks about holding dual citizenship and his cultural and ethnic identity. He talks about coming to the United States to study computer science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, including the differences in American and Honduran cultural norms, the diverse student body, and his social life. He discusses interning for Intel during the summers while at Purdue, and then beginning work as a software engineer for the company in Hillsboro, Oregon, shortly after he graduated. He also talks about his robotics-related volunteer work. He closes the interview by discussing how his views have changed regarding immigration and the value of diversity.

Vilches, Alejandro, 1980-

Oral history interview with Alfred H. Corbett

This oral history interview with Alfred H. Corbett was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from November 29, 1991, to April 24, 1992. In this interview, Corbett discusses his family background and early life in the Dunthorpe neighborhood of Portland and in eastern Oregon. He also discusses the political career of his father, Henry Ladd Corbett, and life during the Depression. He then talks about his education, including studying business at Harvard and law at Yale. He discusses meeting his wife, Nancy deCanizares, and her family background and early life. He briefly discusses his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, where he fought in Italy from 1943 to 1945. Corbett talks about practicing law in Portland and about some of his clients, including the Southern Pacific Railroad. He also talks about his brief service on the Portland Housing Authority at the time of the Vanport Flood; his year in the Defense Electric Power Administration; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and returning to Oregon to run for the state Legislature.

Corbett discusses his legislative career in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1953 to 1956. He talks about his campaigns, partisan politics, and his committee appointments. He discusses legislation he worked on, including on child care funding, education, civil rights, and budgeting. He also speaks at length about serving on the Ways and Means Committee. He then discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1957 to 1964, particularly his continued work on the Ways and Means Committee. He discusses some of the legislation he worked on, including on health care.

Corbett then discusses working on the 1956 presidential campaign of Adlai Stevenson and his own 1964 campaign for Oregon secretary of state. He discusses his work in the federal Office of Economic Opportunity in Washington, D.C., from 1965 to 1972, and then in the Legal Services Corporation until his retirement in 1978. He talks about some of the programs he was affiliated with in those positions, including educational, legal aid, and health care programs. Additionally, he discusses his dealings with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse and U.S. Rep. Edith Green. He also talks about clashing with the Nixon administration. He closes the interview by talking about his activities in retirement and his family life.

Corbett, Alfred H. (Alfred Hoyt), 1915-2000

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from May 10, 1985, to September 3, 1986. The audio for this interview is incomplete; Tape 22 was discovered to be blank in 2020, but its content is represented in both an incomplete transcript and a completed index.

In this interview, Goodwin discusses his family background and early life in Bellingham, Washington, and Portland and Prineville, Oregon, including his early education, his memories of the Depression, and life on a farm. He talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including his social life. He speaks at length about his Army service in Europe during World War II, including his experiences in combat and freeing prisoners. He also talks about his marriages and family life. He discusses returning to the University of Oregon to study law, and how his background in journalism influenced his decision-making as a judge. He speaks at length about working for the Eugene Register-Guard newspaper, as well as his support for and later disillusionment with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse.

Goodwin discusses practicing law in Eugene. He talks about cases he argued, including as a court-appointed lawyer. He also talks about his involvement in the Republican Party, including serving as a precinct committee member. He discusses serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including his appointment and later re-election, cases he heard, and his decision-making process. He then discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court, including his appointment and later re-election, his fellow justices, and some of the cases they heard. He talks about opinions he wrote, as well as his involvement in the effort to revise the Oregon state constitution in the 1960s. He discusses the changes in laws regarding the criminal code and civil rights, and how that affected the decisions of the Oregon Supreme Court. He also discusses his views on the Vietnam War, the criminalization of drug use, and the civil rights movement of the 1960s. He discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including his appointment and confirmation, his fellow judges, and some of the cases he heard. He discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, including his appointment and confirmation; cases he heard, particularly concerning immigration and anti-trust law; and his opinion on Roe v. Wade. He also discusses the role of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, his fellow judges, and his involvement with the American Bar Association. He talks about continuing education opportunities for members of the judiciary; his children, their careers, and their families; and his involvement with the Presbyterian Church. He closes the interview by discussing his move to California.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Alice Tomkins Fee

This oral history interview with Alice Tomkins Fee was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, from February 8 to March 8, 1985. In this interview, Fee discusses her family background and early life in Portland and Cascade Locks, Oregon, including her education, her memories of World War I, and the lack of career options available to women. She discusses attending the Oregon Normal School in Monmouth, including her teachers and social life, and studying music at the University of Oregon. She then talks about her career as a teacher and principal at schools in Malin, Pine Grove, and Hood River, Oregon. She also discusses the numerous health issues she's had over the years. She speaks about working as a typist in the clerk's office for the U.S. District Court of Oregon, then as a stenographer for naturalization and bankruptcy cases, and then as a law clerk. She discusses the judges she worked with, the Pioneer Courthouse, and the procedures of the court. She speaks at length about her husband, Judge James Alger Fee, including his family background, early life, and judicial career, as well as cases he presided over and her work as his secretary. She discusses the circumstances surrounding Judge Fee's heart attack in 1959 and his funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. She closes the interview by talking about her activities since her husband's death, including traveling, cooking and reading.

Fee, Alice Tomkins (Alice Emma Tomkins), 1897-1995

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Alma I. Bingham

This oral history interview with Alma I. Bingham was conducted by David Havens Newhall on March 3, 1989, at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. The interview was conducted as part of the Portland State University Series, which was a series of oral history interviews with Portland State University faculty that were conducted by other PSU faculty.

In this interview, Bingham discusses her family background and early life in Portland. She then talks about her education at both the University of California at Los Angeles and at Columbia University. She speaks at length about her work at Portland State University during its early years, including Willard Spalding's role at the PSU Department of Education, the campus facilities, and committee work. She also talks about student activities. She discusses the university's relationship with the state Legislature and other universities, teaching summer courses at the University of Maine, and the development of PSU's School of Education. She closes the interview by discussing her retirement activities.

Bingham, Alma I. (Alma Irene), 1920-2016

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman

  • SR 11275
  • Collection
  • 2005-04-05 - 2005-04-25

In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father. He discusses his mother's remarriage and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014

Oral history interview with Amo DeBernardis, by Corbett Gottfried

  • SR 2079
  • Collection
  • 1993-04-09 - 1993-11-05

De Bernardis discusses his family background and early life as the son of Italian immigrants in Northeast Portland, his education and teachers that influenced him, changes in higher education after World War II, the creation of Portland Community College and his time as president.

De Bernardis, Amo

Oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty

This oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty was conducted by Clark Hansen in Haggerty's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, in four sessions from December 9, 2005, to February 23, 2006. Interview sessions in December 2005, part of a session in January 2006, and the session in February 2006 were recorded on audiocassette. The other part of the session in January 2006 was recorded on videocassette.

In the December 2005 and January 2006 sessions recorded on audiocassette, Haggerty discusses his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, including his involvement in high school football. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, his views on the Vietnam War, and joining the Marine Corps. He discusses his military training, being wounded in Vietnam in 1968, and his rehabilitation. He also discusses some of the politics contemporary to the interview session in 2005. He talks about attending the U.C. Hastings College of the Law and taking the Oregon bar exam in 1973.

Haggerty speaks about his legal career, beginning with a brief discussion of his work as a public defender for the Metropolitan Public Defender in Portland from 1973 to 1977. He then talks about working as a lawyer with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt from 1977 to 1989. He discusses his marriage to Judith Ann Blair in 1983, and their children. He talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1990 to 1993, including his appointment by Governor Neil Goldschmidt, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election campaign. He then talks about serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1993 to the time of the interview in 2006. He talks about his nomination by President Bill Clinton.

In the January 2006 video recording, Haggerty revisits the topic of his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, his interest in playing football, and his service in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. He then speaks in more detail about his college experience at U.C. Hastings College of the Law; his work as a public defender in Portland; and practicing law at Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt. He also talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and describes his experience as a judge on the Tom Metzger case, as well as other cases he heard. He then discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including his fellow judges, writing opinions, and serving as chief judge. He closes the video session by discussing his judicial philosophy.

In the final, audio-only interview session in February 2006, Haggerty discusses his early years as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, his relationship with his fellow District Court judges and other court employees, and the role of the court. He talks about some of the cases he heard, his staff, and serving as chief judge from 2002 until the time of the interview in 2006. He also discusses writing opinions, funding for the courts, and the make-up of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2006. He talks about the public opinion of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, jury trials, and sentencing. He talks about national politics between 2000 and 2006. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments.

Haggerty, Ancer Lee, 1944-

Oral history interview with Anisha Ginshing

This oral history interview with Anisha Ginshing was conducted by Sankar Raman on April 4, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Ginshing discusses her early life in a camp for Bhutanese refugees in Nepal. She then talks about immigrating to the United States with her family at the age of 9, and settling in Idaho. She talks about her elementary school education in Idaho and about learning English as a second language; the reasons for her family's move to Portland, Oregon; and her high school education in Portland, including taking Advanced Placement classes and her extracurricular activities. She talks about her interest in Nepali culture; applying for college; and her plans to become a nurse. She closes the interview by discussing her cultural and ethnic identity; the dangerous conditions for women and girls in Nepal; and her most challenging high school classes.

Ginshing, Anisha, 1999-

Results 1 to 28 of 466